WMM Playlist from June 10, 2020

Wednesday MidDay Medley
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Music Of The Movement
+ Marion Merritt + Betse Ellis +
Sterling Witt

As Pete Seeger wrote: “Songs gave them the courage to believe they would not fail.” WMM features music of and inspired by The Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter Movement.

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Orig. Motion Picture Soundtrack All That Jazz / Casablanca / Dec. 20, 1979
[WMM’s Adopted Theme Song]

2. Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell & Spirit of Praise – “Ella’s Song”
from: Soundtrack to Boycott / HBO / February 13, 2001
[Song written by Bernice Johnson Reagon, one of the founders of Sweet Honey in The Rock. Boycott is a critically acclaimed 2001 film staring Jeffrey Wright as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Terrence Howard as Ralph Abernathy, and CCH Pounder as Jo Ann Robinson.]

10:06 – 2020 Spring Fund Drive Edition Pledge Break #1

Guest Fund Drive Co-Hosts: Betse Ellis and Marion Merritt

Betse Ellis

Betse Ellis is originally from Fayetteville, Arkansas. She received her Bachelors of Arts in Music and a Bachelors of Arts in English, from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. She has been playing the Violin for over 40 years, with over 20 years playing fiddle and also working as a teacher of music. Betse was one of the founding members of the critically acclaimed and internationally known band, The Wilders. Betse has released two solo records, and for the last several years is recording and performing with her partner, multi-instrumentalist Clarke Wyatt, as Betse & Clarke. Betse Ellis is also part of the Short Round Stringband, the 5-piece band that last year released a 14-track album called, Ain’t No Part of Nothin’ that is a musical tribute to Bill Monroe.

Betse Ellis, Thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Marion Merritt

Marion Merritt is our most frequent contributor to WMM, She grew up in Los Angeles, and St. Louis. She went to college in Columbia, Missouri. She studied art and musical engineering, and is a avid lover of classic films and punk rock music. She saw Talking Heads on their first U.S. tour when they played One Block West in 1978. For 16 years she has been sharing her musical discoveries and information from her musically-encyclopedic brain on Wednesday MidDay Medley. Marion has joined us for every on-air fund drive to help raise funds for the MidCoast Radio Project. With her partner Ann Stewart, Marion is the proprietor of Records With Merritt, at 1614 Westport Rd. in Kansas City, Missouri. Records With Merritt features new vinyl releases, in-store performances from young and upcoming bands, holds meetings for a vinyl listening club, and was once the location for a wedding, and a 30th birthday party. More information at: http://www.recordwithmerritt.com

Marion Merritt, Thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Non-Commercial, Community Radio, means that three times a year, we interrupt our regularly scheduled programming, to ask YOU our beautiful-listeners, to help us continue 90.1 FM’s unique mission an, 24-7 programming. 90.1 FM KKFI is celebrating our 32nd year on the airwaves. While the spirit of this station is kept alive by hundreds of volunteers who passionately donate their time and abilities to keep the transmission of our 100,000-watt-signal alive. We are a operated by a not-for-profit organization, incorporated over 40 years ago, called The MidCoast Radio Project. We’re non-profit, but we still have to pay the electric bill, the rent on our fully accessible production studios and offices, insurance, staff, royalties, production expenses. Even though we have hundreds of committed volunteers, who donate thousands of hours every year, producing radio shows, answering phones, creating websites, producing benefits, rewiring the board, setting up our computer system, we still need YOU, our listener.

YOU are the reason we are able to stay alive. Volunteers are waiting to hear from YOU right now. It only takes a few minutes. Call 888-931-0901. You can also visit us at http://www.kkfi.org, or call 888-931-0901 to support Kansas City Community Radio 90.1 FM.

Last year on WMM conducted 127 interviews, with 209 special guests.

10:14 – Music Of The Movement

3. Solomon Burke – “None Of Us Are Free”
from: Don’t Give Up On Me / Fat Possum / 2002
[Back up singers: The Blind Boys of Alabama. Born James Solomon McDonald, March 21, 1940, Solomon Burke died October 10, 2010. He was an American preacher & singer, who shaped the sound of rhythm & blues as one of the founding fathers of soul music in the 1960s and a “key transitional figure in the development of soul music from rhythm & blues. During the 55 years that he performed professionally, Burke released 38 studio albums on at least 17 record labels and had 35 singles that charted in the US, including 26 singles that made the Billboard R&B charts. In 2001, Burke was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a performer. His album Don’t Give Up on Me won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003. By 2005 Burke was credited with selling 17 million albums.]

4. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – “This Land is Your Land”
from: Naturally / Daptone / 2005 [written by Woody Guthrie.]
[In November 2016, Sharon Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 United States presidential election results and another the following day. Jones remained alert and lucid during the initial period of her hospital stay, jokingly claiming that the news of Donald Trump’s victory was responsible for her stroke. She died on November 18, 2016, in Cooperstown, New York, aged 60. Sharon Lafaye Jones was born May 4, 1956 and died this year on November 18, 2016. She was an American soul and funk singer. Although she collaborated with Lou Reed, David Byrne and others, she is best known as lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old. In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy, in the category Best R&B Album, for Give the People What They Want. Jones was born in Augusta, Georgia, the daughter of Ella Mae Price Jones and Charlie Jones, living in adjacent North Augusta, South Carolina. Jones was the youngest of six children; her siblings are Dora, Charles, Ike, Willa and Henry. Jones’s mother raised her deceased sister’s four children as well as her own. She moved the family to New York City when Sharon was a young child. As children, she and her brothers would often imitate the singing and dancing of James Brown. Her mother happened to know Brown, who was also from Augusta.Jones grew up in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, she graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. She attended Brooklyn College. A regular gospel singer in church, Jones often entered talent shows backed by local funk bands in the early 1970s. Session work then continued with backing vocals, often credited to Lafaye Jones, but in the absence of any recording contract as a solo singer, she spent many years working as a corrections officer at Rikers Island and as an armored car guard for Wells Fargo, until receiving a mid-life career break in 1996 after she appeared on a session backing the soul and deep funk legend Lee Fields. Sharon Jones was part of the very beginning of Daptone Records Daptone Records’ first release was a full-length album by Sharon Jones. A new band, the Dap-Kings, was formed from the former members of the Soul Providers and the Mighty Imperials. Some of the musicians went on to record for Lehman’s Soul Fire label, while some formed the Budos Band, an Afro-beat band. From the original Soul Providers, Roth (also known as Bosco Mann) on bass, guitarist and emcee Binky Griptite, percussionist Fernando Velez, trumpet player Anda Szilagyi and organist Earl Maxton were joined by original Mighty Imperials saxophonist Leon Michels and drummer Homer Steinweiss, plus Neal Sugarman from Sugarman 3, to form The Dap-Kings. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, the released the album Dap Dippin’ with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in May of 2002, , for which they received immediate attention and acclaim from enthusiasts, DJs and collectors. Next they released, Naturally (2005), 100 Days, 100 Nights (2007) and I Learned the Hard Way (2010). They are seen by many as the spearhead of a revival of soul and funk.]

10:24 – Pledge Break #2

Our WMM Spring Fund Drive Team: Marion Merritt and Betse Ellis

10:32 – Underwriting

10:34 – Music Of The Movement

5. Bobby Watson & The I Have a Dream Project–”Check Cashing Day” [feat. Glenn North]
from: Check Cashing Day / Lafiya Music / Aug. 28, 2013
[From wikipedia.org: “Bobby Watson was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1953. he is an American post-bop jazz alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. Watson now has 27 recordings as a leader. He appears on nearly 100 other recordings as either co-leader or in a supporting role. Watson has recorded more than 100 original compositions. Watson grew up in Bonner Springs and Kansas City, Kansas.]

6. Krystle Warren – “Move!”
from: Three The Hard Way / Parlour Door Music / August 18, 2017
[Produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones. Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections.]

10:44 – Pledge Break #3

Our WMM Spring Fund Drive Team: Marion Merritt and Betse Ellis

Thank you to: Elizabeth Mayer, K.C. Compton, John Long, Garth Matthes, Matt Kesler, Kathi Callahan Welch, Jack Phillips, Joel Nanos

10:52 – Music Of The Movement

7. Radkey – “Ain’t No Sunshine”
from: “Ain’t No Sunshine” – Single / Radkey / April 7, 2020
[Written by Bill Withers. Isaiah, Dee, and Solomon Radke of the critically acclaimed rock trio Radkey joined us live in our 90.1 FM studios on September 5, 2018. Radkey was formed in 2010 in St. Joseph, where the brothers were raised. The family moved to Kansas City. The band has released two full-length recordings — “Dark Black Makeup” in 2015 and “Delicious Rock Noise” in 2016 — plus multiple EPs and singles, and were part of a MasterCard advertising campaign on digital billboards in NYC along with a national television commercial that aired during the 2018 Grammy Awards that brought the band to the attention of Jack White who asked the band to tour with him. In 2018 the band went back on the road with The Damned throughout the United States. In December they went back into the studio to record with producer Bill Stevenson of the California punk rock group Descendents. In early 2019 they played shows in Amsterdam and Stockholm. In 2018 the band released “Basement,” “St. Elwood,” “Rock & Roll Homeschool,” as well as several other singles. On February 22, 2019, Radkey released “No Strange Cats…P.A.W.” a 7-song EP is essentially a collection of the band’s most recent singles. It comes after the January 11, 2019 release of No Strange cats…Spiders – EP a 6 song EP of several new songs mixed with several singles from late 2018.]

[Radkey plays RADKEY LIVE AND LOUD – LIVE STREAMING FROM RECORDBAR’S STAGE, Friday, June 12, 2020 at 8 PM – 10 PM, recordBar, 1520 Grand Boulevard, KCMO. The stream will be free on Facebook Live, IG Live and youtube. We are requesting donations through this page. We’ll be back open in late July. Stay safe, stay healthy.]

8. Hi-Lux – “Revolution”
from: Revolution / Get What You Give – Single / The Record Machine / March 6, 2020
[This KC based band is lead by singer Julia Haile, with Tim Braun on guitar, Nick Howell on keys, Dan Loftus on bass and Kian Bryne on drums. Hi-Lux is a Modern-Soul band that blends and bends the boundaries between soul, rock n roll, reggae, and funk. This group aims to create music that pays tribute to their myriad of influences (Amy Winehouse, The Meters, Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings) but also claims a spotlight of its own in the musical world. After a string os single releases, including one on 7” vinyl through Sunflower Soul Records, followed by the release of their self-titled EP, Hi-Lux has introduced an eclectic and impressive collection of songs to give the world a small taste of what’s to come. Hi-Lux is on a journey of musical discovery, mixing old and new to create something unique.]

9. Sterling Witt – “Werewolf”
from: Something’s Awry / Grand River Records Records / April 10, 2020
[All songs written by Sterling Witt. Copyright 2020 Disheartened Music (ASCAP). Produced by Sterling Witt. Recorded by Joel Nanos at Element Recording Studios, Kansas City Missouri. Sterling Witt on vocals & guitar, Kitten A. Boggs on bass & vocals, Evan Verploegh on drums. Grand River Records PO BOX 193 , Freeman MO 64746. http://www.SterlingWitt.com http://www.GrandRiverRecords.com ]

11:00 – Station ID

11:00 – Interview with Sterling Witt

KC based artist & musician Sterling Witt who joins us to share music and information about his new recording, “Something’s Awry” – twelve terrifying songs about monsters, cryptids, demons, parasites and the most unfortunate situations. The 12 songs are based on characters Sterling is writing and editing into a new book that relates to the album. ”Something’s Awry: Ting Tong and Other Terrifying Tales,” features art work by Witt. More info at: http://www.sterlingwitt.com

Sterling Witt Thank you for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Sterling Witt is an artist and musician. He lives in Missouri at the Art Farm near Freeman, MO (about 45 min south of KC).

Something’s Awry – Produced by Sterling Witt – Recorded by Joel Nanos at Element Recording Studios, Kansas City Missouri.

Sterling Witt – vocals, guitar, Kitten A. Boggs – bass, vocals , Evan Verploegh – drums

Grand River Records, PO BOX 193, Freeman MO 64746

http://www.SterlingWitt.com http://www.GrandRiverRecords.com

“Originality is a hard thing to come by these days; and not a word we use lightly, but it has to be said – Sterling Witt is IT.” -Indie Music Magazine

Since 2004 Sterling Witt has released five full-length albums and one 8-song EP, along with several singles. Witt’s latest album, “Satyagraha” was produced by Steve Albini at Electrical Audio Studios in Chicago, Illinois. Sterling is currently preparing for his first museum show at the Albrecht-Kemper Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri.

Sterling Witt Discography

April 2020 – Something’s Awry
Oct 2015 – Satyagraha
Oct 2012 – Sterling Loves U
Aug 2009 – Shadows & Secrets
Aug 2006 – Sea Things
Oct 2004 – Self Portrait
Jan 2009 – Skeleton

Sterling told Nick Spack of The Pitch KC, “I’m in the final stages of writing and editing a book right now that relates to my album,” Witt says. “The album has 12 songs and the book has 24 stories and poems. Half of those stories I turned into songs to make the album Something’s Awry. – I was still writing the stories—half of which turned out to be poems that rhyme,” Witt continues. “All those poems sounded like they could be songs to me and my first thought was to keep the words to the songs in the same order as the poems, so that the story could be understood from listening to the song.”

Witt says that Something’s Awry, the album, can be thought of as being like an amped up audio book, with all the musical arrangements dictated by the words: “There are many oddities in the music and vocal melodies that happen just once. Maintaining the stories was the only rule I gave myself while turning them into songs: The words made me do it.”

The Art Farm is an isolated oasis in the country designed for making art and music. Sterling does not have Internet or TV.

Since 2004 Sterling Witt has released six full-length albums and one 8-song EP, along with several singles. Witt’s last album, “Satyagraha” was produced by Steve Albini at Electrical Audio Studios in Chicago, Illinois

Sterling Witt Thanks for being with us on WMM

Sterling Witt’s Something’s Awry is available now at sterlingwitt.bandcamp.com, with vinyl and compact disc versions coming later this year.

11:12

10. Sterling Witt – “Kelpie”
from: Something’s Awry / Grand River Records Records / April 10, 2020
[All songs written by Sterling Witt. Copyright 2020 Disheartened Music (ASCAP). Produced by Sterling Witt. Recorded by Joel Nanos at Element Recording Studios, Kansas City Missouri. Sterling Witt on vocals & guitar, Kitten A. Boggs on bass & vocals, Evan Verploegh on drums. Grand River Records PO BOX 193 , Freeman MO 64746. http://www.SterlingWitt.com http://www.GrandRiverRecords.com ]

11:15 – Pledge Break #4

This is WMM’s Spring Fund Drive Show with Marion Merritt & Betse Ellis.

Thank you to: Jennifer C. Owen, Joyce Downing, Bob Walkenhorst, Katherine Torbett, Matt Richey, Jon Cupit, Joelle St. Pierre, Kieth Clark, Jan Kohl

Earlier in the show we heard Krystle Warren. We were the first to play her music on the radio. Mark interviewed Krystle on KKFI in early 2002. During a winter snow storm, at a huge party where Krystle played with longtime friend Solomon Dorsey on bass, in a packed, smoke filled apartment, near Community Christian Church, Mark waited hours for a 2 song demo, that contained a song called “Chanel #5.” Krystle has since gone on to tour all over the world, but maintains contact with her hometown of KC. Krystle’s critically acclaimed album, Three The Hard Way was #1 on WMM’s 117 Best Recordings of 2017. WMM was the first to play tracks from Krystle’s album.

KKFI’s Mission Statement: KKFI is the Kansas City area’s independent, noncommercial community radio station. We seek to stimulate, educate and entertain our audience, to reflect the diversity of the local and world community, and to provide a channel for individuals and groups, issues and music that have been overlooked, suppressed or under-represented by other media.

KKFI’s Philosophy Statement: KKFI is committed to diversity in programming and discourse and seeks to create a climate of mutual respect and collaboration among volunteers and staff.

11:23 – Music Of The Movement

11. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: Single / Stax (Fantasy / Ace) / 1967
[The Staple Singers were an American gospel, soul and R&B singing group. Roebuck “Pops” Staples (December 28, 1914 – December 19, 2000), the patriarch of the family, formed the group with his children Cleotha (April 11, 1934 – February 21, 2013),[Pervis (b. 1935), and Mavis (b. 1939). Yvonne (October 23, 1937 – April 10, 2018) replaced her brother when he was drafted into the U.S. Army, and again in 1970. They are best known for their 1970s hits “Respect Yourself”, “I’ll Take You There”, “If You’re Ready (Come Go with Me)”, and “Let’s Do It Again”. While the family name is Staples, the group used “Staple” commercially. // First child to Roebuck “Pops” Staples and his wife Oceola Staples, Cleotha was born in Drew, Mississippi in 1934. Two years later, Roebuck moved his family from Mississippi to Chicago. Roebuck and Oceola’s children, son Pervis and daughters, Mavis and Yvonne, were born in Chicago. Roebuck worked in steel mills and meat packing plants while his family of four children grew up. The family began appearing in Chicago-area churches in 1948. Their first public singing appearance was at the Mount Zion Church, Chicago, where Roebuck’s brother, the Rev. Chester Staples, was pastor.[6] They signed their first professional contract in 1952. During their early career, they recorded in an acoustic gospel-folk style with various labels: United Records, Vee-Jay Records (their “Uncloudy Day” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” were best sellers), Checker Records, Riverside Records, and then Epic Records in 1965. “Uncloudy Day” was an early influence on Bob Dylan, who said of it in 2015, “It was the most mysterious thing I’d ever heard… I’d think about them even at my school desk…Mavis looked to be about the same age as me in her picture (on the cover of “Uncloudy Day”)…Her singing just knocked me out…And Mavis was a great singer—deep and mysterious. And even at the young age, I felt that life itself was a mystery.” // The Staples move to Epic saw a run of albums, including the live in-church Freedom Highway album produced by Billy Sherrill; the title track of which was a civil rights movement protest song penned by Pops Staples. It was on Epic that the Staple Singers developed a style more accessible to mainstream audiences, with “Why (Am I Treated So Bad)” and “For What It’s Worth” (Stephen Stills) in 1967. In 1968, the Staple Singers signed to Stax Records and released two albums with Steve Cropper—Soul Folk in Action and We’ll Get Over, Pervis returning for them. After Cropper left Stax, Al Bell produced their recordings, conducting the rhythm sessions at the famed Muscle Shoals Sound Studio and cutting the overdubs himself with engineer/musician Terry Manning at Memphis’s Ardent Studios, moving in a more funk and soul direction. // “For most of this decade, Roebuck Staples—born December 12, 1915, about two weeks after Frank Sinatra—has been the oldest performer with direct access to the hit parade by some twenty-five years, so here’s your chance to mind your elders. It’s Mavis’s lowdown, occasionally undefined growl that dominates, of course; you should hear how secular she gets with an O.V. Wright blues that got buried on The Staple Swingers. But Pops’s unassuming moralism sets the tone and his guitar assures the flow.” —The Best of the Staples Singers review in Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981) // The Staple Singers’ first Stax hit was “Heavy Makes You Happy (Sha-Na-Boom-Boom)” in early 1971. Their late 1971 recording of “Respect Yourself”, written by Luther Ingram and Mack Rice, peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard R&B chart and No. 12 on the Billboard Hot 100. Both hits sold over one million copies and were each awarded a gold disc by the RIAA. The song’s theme of self-empowerment had universal appeal, released in the period immediately following the intense American civil rights movement of the 1960s. In 1972, “I’ll Take You There” topped both Billboard charts. In 1973, “If You’re Ready (Come Go With Me)” reached No. 9 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on the R&B chart. // After Stax’s 1975 bankruptcy, The Staple Singers signed to Curtis Mayfield’s label, Curtom Records, and released “Let’s Do It Again”, produced by Mayfield; the song became their second No. 1 pop hit in the U.S., and the album was also successful. In 1976, they collaborated with The Band for their film The Last Waltz, performing on the song “The Weight” (which The Staple Singers had previously covered on their first Stax album). However, they were not able to regain their momentum, releasing only occasional minor hits. The 1984 album Turning Point featured a cover of the Talking Heads’ “Slippery People” (it reached the Top 5 on the Dance chart). In 1994, they again performed the song “The Weight” with country music artist Marty Stuart for MCA Nashville’s Rhythm, Country and Blues compilation, somewhat re-establishing an audience. The song “Respect Yourself” was used by Spike Lee in the soundtrack to his movie Crooklyn, made in 1994. // In 1999, The Staple Singers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Pops Staples died of complications from a concussion suffered in December 2000. In 2005, the group was awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Cleotha Staples died in Chicago on February 21, 2013, at the age of 78, after suffering from Alzheimer’s disease for over a decade. Mavis Staples has continued to carry on the family tradition and continues to add her vocal talents to both the projects of other artists and her own solo ventures. She appeared at Glastonbury in 2015, and her 2016 album Livin’ on a High Note includes a simple acoustic version of a Martin Luther King sermon in the track “MLK Song”. Yvonne Staples died on April 10, 2018 at the age of 80.]

12. Mavis Staples – “Eyes On The Prize”
from: We’ll Never Turn Back / Anti / April 24, 2007
[Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Mavis Staples, of The Staple Singers, is a celebrated equal rights activist. She’s performed at inaugural parties for Presidents Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Recordedin the run up to the Presidential election of Barrack Obama. Mavis Staples, marched, sang & protested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. We’ll Never Turn Back is the seventh studio album by American gospel and soul singer Mavis Staples. Recorded in 2007 and produced by roots rock and blues musician Ry Cooder, it is a concept album with lyrical themes relating to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Upon its release, We’ll Never Turn Back received positive reviews from most music critics. It was also named one of the best albums of 2007 by several music writers and publications. “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize” is a folk song that became influential during the American Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It is based on the traditional song, “Gospel Plow,” also known as “Hold On,” “Keep Your Hand on the Plow,” and various permutations thereof. An early reference to the older song, “Gospel Plow,” is in Alan Lomax’s 1949 book “Our Singing Country.” The book references a 1937 recording by Elihu Trusty of Paintsville, Kentucky, which is in the Library of Congress (Ref No .1397 A1). Lomax’s references for Gospel Plow cite two earlier works. The first is from English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians published in 1917, indicating that Gospel Plow dates from at least the early twentieth century. The second reference is to a 1928 book, American Negro Folk-Songs, which shows an African-American heritage for the original song. The lyrics to the modern Civil Rights version of the song, “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize” are often attributed to Alice Wine from Johns Island, South Carolina. Mrs. Wine was a member of the Moving Star Hall and The Progressive Club on Johns Island. The book Ain’t You Got the Right to the Tree of Life by Guy and Candie Carawan. documents songs of the Moving Star Hall and the lives of African Americans on Johns Island in the early sixties. It is doubtful that Mrs. Wine actually composed the lyrics herself. More likely she had heard the revised refrain and variations on the verses of the older song from the congregation at the praise hall. The leading “Paul and Silas” stanzas in the modern “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize” lyrics were already present in some versions of the older “Keep Your Hand on the Plow.” Our Singing Country[1] shows these lyrics were already in use in 1949 and before. Odetta used them in her 1960 Carnegie Hall appearance and recording. Mrs Wine is credited by Candie Carawan only with having passed onto Guy Carawan the revision of the title from “Keep Your Hand on the Plow” to “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize.” Lyrics for traditional American folk songs and African-American spirituals are often changed, improvised and traded between songs by different artists and at different performances. This was and is especially true in the call and response of African American religious music. For example, Mahalia Jackson, in her 1958 performance of “Keep Your Hand on the Plow”, begins with the couplet “Mary had three links of chain, Every link bearin’ Jesus name.” Bob Dylan also sings these lyrics in his upbeat version of “Gospel Plow.” Carl Sandburg, in his 1927 book The American Songbag,[7] attributes these lyrics to yet another song entirely, “Mary Wore Three Links of Chain.” Modern choral arrangements of this song sound entirely different from either the Eyes-Prize or Hand-Plow songs.[8] Both Sandberg in the preface to his book and folk singer Pete Seeger in the opening remarks to his Carnegie Hall performance of “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize” note the malleability of American and African-American folk music. No one artist can be historically credited with “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize.]

11:30 – Underwriting

11:32 – Pledge Break #5

This is WMM’s Spring Fund Drive Show with Marion Merritt, & Betse Ellis.

Thank you to: Joy Baker, Marcia Pomeroy, Pat Abts, Charlie Colborne, Rhonda Lyne, Deloris Jankovich, Nancy Nicolay, Natasha Derakhshanian, Elaine Meizlich, Necia Gamby, Kimberly DeVries, Leo Wetherill, Mike McCoy, Jon D. Barnhart, Claire McDaniels, William Smith, Mike Walker, Fran Stanton

WMM offers loads and loads of information about what is going on in the community. Not only do we interview nearly 200 guest each year, not only do we play nearly 1000 different songs with nearly half of those being locally produced, but we also shine a light on area not-for-profit theatre companies, art museums & galleries, area festivals, service organizations, area record labels and record stores, the area music scene, arts scene, theatre scene, literary arts scene, political action scene.

In just this past year, we’ve featured segments shining a light on: The Black Archives of Mid America, Olathe Public Library’s Music Series, InterUrban ArtHouse Queer Story Telling, Middle of The Map Fest, Outer Reaches Fest, Troost Fest, North KC Music Fest, Porch Fest KC, Crossroads Music Fest, Manor Fest, Lawrence Field Day Fest, KC PrideFest, Midwest Music Foundation, MidCoast Takeover, Playlist Play, Kansas City Public Library, GLAMA, MOCSA, Topeka Women’s Correctional Facility, The Midwest Innocence Project, Record Store Day, Folk Alliance International Conference, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., George Washington Carver, Kansas City Art Institute, Bach Aria Soloist, KC Gamelan Genta Kasturi, Owen Cox Dance Group, American Jazz Museum, Never Records, KC Fringe Theatre Fest, Late Night Theatre, Girls Rock! and the Annual Girls Rock! Camp, The Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Apocalypse Meow, Union Station, Plaza Art Fair, Center Cut Records, Black Site Records, Haymaker Records, The Record Machine, Datura Records, Too Much Rock, Revolution Records, Sister Anne’s Records, Mills Record Company, Josey Records, Recoprds With Merritt, Squeezebox Theatre, Crossroads KC, The Midland Theatre, Johnson County Performing Arts Series, Shelf Life, The Lesbian & Gay Film Festival, The Band That Fell To Earth A Tribute To David Bowie, The Kauffman Center for The Performing Arts, UMKC Conservatory of Music.

11:39 – Music Of The Movement

13. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

14. Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter & Chorus -“Rocka My Soul”
from: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre “Revelations” / V2 / 1998
[Revelations is the signature choreographic work of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. It was first produced by Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City, New York on January 31, 1960. Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom through a suite of dances set to spirituals and blues music. It’s been performed in over 70 countries in the half century since then and has been described as “the most widely seen modern dance work in the world.” The finale song of the three part “Revelations” is “Rocka My Soul In The Bosom Of Abraham” and it has been described by writer Juliana Lewis-Ferguson as a, “spiritually powerful conclusion to the suite and a purely physical release of emotion.”]

11:46 – Pledge Break #6

This is WMM’s Spring Fund Drive Show with Marion Merritt, & Betse Ellis.

Thank you to all who donated. Over 63 people donated and we raised, $3723.00.

11:53 – Music Of The Movement

15. The Freedom Affair – “Imagine”
from: “Imagine” – Single / Sunflower Soul Records / March 20, 2020
[Music & Lyrics by John Lennon. The Freedom Affair is a project of Chris Hazelton of Sunflower Soul Records and Chris Hazelton’s Boogaloo 7. The Freedom Affair is: Misha Roberts on vocals, Seyko Groves on vocals, Paula Saunders on vocals, Cole Bales on guitar, Branden Moser on guitar, Chris Hazelton on bass, Dave Brick on drums, Pete Carroll on trumpet, and Brett Jackson on saxophone. Additional musicians include: Matt Bennett on violin, and Alyssa Bell in viola. Arranged, Produced, Recorded, & Mixed by Chris Hazelton. Mastered by Adam Boose at Cauliflower Audio. The Freedom Affair and their track “Rise Up” were selected to be part of Colemine Records 3xLP box set, “Soul Slabs Vol. 2” a Record Store Day Exclusive, released April 13, 2019. Colemine Records writes: “The Freedom Affair is a freight train of Kansas City soul! Dirty, funky drums, gritty horns, and the combined vocals of Misha Roberts, Seyko Groves, and Paula Saunders to put this band over the top. Politically charged soul music for the dancefloor!”]

16. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

11:58 – Arts Calendar

Next week on Wednesday, June 17 we’ll play from 25 area bands & artists as we feature: Our Favorite MidCoastal Releases of 2020 …So far! We’ll hear from Una Walkenhorst, Blackstarkids, The Republic Tigers, Ivory Blue, Ebony Tusks, Fritz Hutchison, Katy Guillen & The Drive, Hermon Mehari, Betse & Clarke, Fullbloods, Sam Wells, Pedaljets, Miki P & The Swallowtails, Radkey, Saint Sé, David Burchfield, The Freedom Affair, Sterling Witt, Quiet Takes, Miss Boating, Hi-Lux, Brandon Phillips & The Condition, MGDs, Nan + The One Nite Stands, Plus, we’ll talk with members of the band Oh Dear Oh My.

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #841

WMM presents: Music Of The Movement

Wednesday MidDay Medley
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Music Of The Movement
+ Marion Merritt + Betse Ellis +
Sterling Wit
t

Mark features “Music Of The Movement.” We’ll spin tracks of and inspired by The Civil Rights & Black Lives Matter Movement. Mark plays songs from: Krystle Warren, Hi-Lux, The Freedom Affair, Radkey, Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project featuring Glenn North, Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Sweet Honey In The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell And Spirit Of Praise, Billy Porter, Tramine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Pete Seeger, and Solomon Burke.

One of WMM’s longtime (14-years) contributors, Marion Merritt of Records With Merritt, a minority owned business in KCMO, joins us as our special guest co-host. We also welcome Betse Ellis, critically acclaimed fiddler, singer, songwriter, and one half of Betse & Clarke who joins us as special guest co-host. Betse & Marion will encourage our listeners to call 888-931-0901, or visit http://www.kkfi.org to support 90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio during our Spring Fund Drive Show.

At 11:00 AM, KC based artist & musician Sterling Witt joins us to share music and information about his new recording, “Something’s Awry” twelve terrifying songs about monsters, cryptids, demons, parasites and the most unfortunate situations. The 12 songs are based on characters Sterling is writing in a new book called, ”Something’s Awry: Ting Tong and Other Terrifying Tales,” featuring art work by Witt. More info at: http://www.sterlingwitt.com

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #841

WMM Playlist from Jan. 15, 2020

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

WMM Celebrates MLK

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / Universal / Dec. 20, 1979
[WMM’s theme]

2. Soweto Gospel Choir – “Pride (In The Name of Love)”
from: In the Name of Love – Africa Celebrates U2 / Shout! Factory Records / 2008
[Formed in Soweto, South Africa, by David Mulovhedzi & Beverly Bryer, two choir directors. The 30-member ensemble blends African gospel, Negro spirituals, reggae and American popular music. The group performed at the first of the 46664 concerts for Nelson Mandela and has toured internationally. Their albums Blessed and African Spirit won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2007 and 2008.]

3. International Noise Conspiracy / MLK Jr. – “The First Conspiracy / Let Freedom Ring”
from: Adbusters – Live Without Dead Time / Adbusters / 2003
[The (International) Noise Conspiracy (abbreviated T(I)NC) were a Swedish rock band formed in Sweden in the late months of 1998. The line-up consists of Dennis Lyxzén (vocals), Inge Johansson (bass), Lars Strömberg (guitar), and Ludwig Dahlberg (drums). The band is known for its punk and garage rock musical influences, and its impassioned left-wing political stance. Influenced by a quote from 1960’s folk singer Phil Ochs, according to lead singer Lyxzén, the band wanted to achieve an ideal blend of music and politics that was, “a cross between Elvis Presley and Che Guevara.”]

4. Labelle – “Something in The Air / The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” (CD #4) (5:55)
from: Something Silver / Warner Archives / 1997 [orig. Pressure Cookin’ / 1973, 3rd album from the funk/soul trio of: Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx and Sarah Dash who each shared a rap on “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. It was the B-side to Scott-Heron’s first single, “Home Is Where the Hatred Is”, from his album Pieces of a Man (1971). “Something in the Air” is a song orig. recorded by Thunderclap Newman, a band created by Pete Townshend for The Who’s former roadie John ‘Speedy’ Keen who wrote and sang the song. It was a UK #1 single for three weeks in July 1969.]

10:10

Wednesday MidDay Medley celebrates the life of human rights icon, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born Jan. 15, 1929.

MLK led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, was a cofounder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, and served as it’s first president. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his, “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination thru civil disobedience and non-violent means.

By the time of his death in 1968, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War. King was assassinated, April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I.

As Pete Seeger wrote: “Songs gave them the courage to believe they would not fail.” Today we feature music of and inspired by the civil rights movement from: Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project (featuring Glenn North), Kelly Hunt, Krystle Warren, Laura Love, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, Pops Staples, Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, The Holmes Brothers, The Chambers Brothers, The Isley Brothers, Pete Seeger, Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion. We started w/: Soweto Gospel Choir, The Intl. Noise Conspiracy, and Labelle.

10:14 – Soul Brother…

MLK said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

MLK said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

5. Curtis Mayfield – “Beautiful Brother of Mine”
from: Roots / Curtom-Buddah / October, 1971 [2nd solo release from Curtis Mayfield, born in Chicago, June 3, 1942. One of the most influential musicians behind soul & politically conscious African-American music. Mayfield started his musical career in a gospel choir. Moving to the North Side of Chicago he met Jerry Butler in 1956 at the age of 14, and joined vocal group The Impressions. As a songwriter, Mayfield became noted as one of the first musicians to bring more prevalent themes of social awareness into soul music. In 1965, he wrote “People Get Ready” for The Impressions, which displayed his more politically charged songwriting. After leaving The Impressions in 1970, Mayfield released several albums, including the soundtrack for the blaxploitation film Super Fly in 1972. The soundtrack was noted for its socially conscious themes, mostly addressing problems surrounding inner city minorities such as crime, poverty and drug abuse. Mayfield was paralyzed from the neck down after lighting equipment fell on him during a live performance at Wingate Field in Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York, on August 13, 1990. Despite this, he continued his career as a recording artist, releasing his final album, New World Order, in 1996. Mayfield won a Grammy Legend Award in 1994 and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995, and was a double inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a member of the Impressions in 1991, and again in 1999 as a solo artist. He was also a 2-time Grammy Hall of Fame inductee. He died from complications of type 2 diabetes, Dec 26, 1999, at 57.]

6. Maceo & The Macks – “Soul Power ’74”
from: James Brown’s Funky People, Pt. 2 / People Records / 1988
[This record is sampled more than crackers and cheese at Costco, it contains samples itself in the form of tape overlays of civil rights rallies, a Dr. King speech, and an announcement of King’s assassination. Maceo Parker played saxophone with James Brown, Parliment, Funkadelic, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and Prince.]

7. Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell & Spirit of Praise – “Ella’s Song”
from: Soundtrack to Boycott / HBO / 2001
[Critically acclaimed 2001 film staring Jeffrey Wright as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Terrence Howard as Ralph Abernathy, and CCH Pounder as Jo Ann Robinson.]

10:28 – Underwriting

10:30 – King’s Life, Death, and Spirit.

MLK said, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

8. Mahalia Jackson – “How I Got Over”
from: The Original Apollo Sessions / Couch & Madison Partners / May 25, 2013
[Gospel hymn composed & published in 1951 by Clara Ward (1924-1973). It was performed by Mahalia Jackson at the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 before 250,000 people. Mahalia Jackson (Oct. 26, 1911 – Jan. 27, 1972) was referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”. She became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world, heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist. She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”. She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers. “I sing God’s music because it makes me feel free,” Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, “It gives me hope. With the blues, when you finish, you still have the blues.”]

9. Martin Luther King Jr. – “MLK – I Have A Dream 1963 (excerpt)”
from: Inspirational Speeches, Vo. 3 / Orange Leisure / May 16, 2011
[American civil rights leader/activist and Baptist minister, born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King’s speeches have been issued on numerous releases – his most well-known and influential address being “I Have a Dream”, which was held during “The March on Washington” in 1963. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.]

10. Marian Anderson – “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
from: He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands / BMG / Orig. 1961 [Reissued 1991]
[Marian Anderson (Feb 27, 1897 – Apr. 8, 1993) was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century. In 1939, the (DAR) refused to let Anderson sing in Constitution Hall. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson became the first black person, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC on Jan. 7, 1955. Anderson worked as a delegate to the UN Human Rights Committee and “goodwill ambassadress” for the U.S. Dept. of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.]

11.Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter & Chorus – “Rocka My Soul”
from: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre “Revelations” / V2 / 1998
[Revelations is the signature choreographic work of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. It was first produced by Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City, New York on January 31, 1960. Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom through a suite of dances set to spirituals and blues music. It’s been performed in over 70 countries in the half century since then and has been described as “the most widely seen modern dance work in the world.” The finale song of the three part “Revelations” is “Rocka My Soul In The Bosom Of Abraham” and it has been described by writer Juliana Lewis-Ferguson as a, “spiritually powerful conclusion to the suite and a purely physical release of emotion.”]

11:42 – Negro Spirituals and Red Clay of Greenwood

12. The Swan Silvertones – “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep”
from: Platinum Gospel: The Swan Silvertones / Sonorous Entertainment / 2012 (1959)
[“Mary Don’t You Weep” (alternately titled “O Mary Don’t You Weep”, “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep, Don’t You Mourn”, or variations thereof) is a Negro spiritual that originates from before the American Civil War – thus it is what scholars call a “slave song,” “a label that describes their origins among the enslaved,” and it contains “coded messages of hope and resistance.” It is one of the most important of Negro spirituals. The song tells the Biblical story of Mary of Bethany and her distraught pleas to Jesus to raise her brother Lazarus from the dead. Other narratives relate to The Exodus and the Passage of the Red Sea, with the chorus proclaiming Pharaoh’s army got drown-ded!, and to God’s rainbow covenant to Noah after the Great Flood. With liberation thus one of its themes, the song again become popular during the Civil Rights Movement. Additionally, a song that explicitly chronicles the victories of the Civil Rights Movement, “If You Miss Me from the Back of the Bus”, written by Charles Neblett of The Freedom Singers, was sung to this tune and became one of the most well-known songs of that movement. In 2015 it was announced that The Swan Silvertones’s version of the song will be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”. The first recording of the song was by the Fisk Jubilee Singers in 1915. The best known recordings were made by the vocal gospel group The Caravans in 1958, with Inez Andrews as the lead singer, and The Swan Silvertones in 1959. “Mary Don’t You Weep” became The Swan Silvertones’ greatest hit, and lead singer Claude Jeter’s interpolation “I’ll be a bridge over deep water if you trust in my name” served as Paul Simon’s inspiration to write his 1970 song “Bridge over Troubled Water”.The spiritual’s lyric God gave Noah the rainbow sign, no more water the fire next time inspired the title for The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s 1963 account of race relations in America.]

13. Krystle Warren – “Red Clay”
from: Three The Hard Way / Parlour Door Music / August 18, 2017
[Produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones. Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections.]

[Krystle Warren & The Faculty play The Hotel Cafe, 1623 N Cahuenga Blvd, Los Angeles, California on Friday, January 17, 2020 at 10:30 PM featuring Krystle Warren, Solomon Dorsey, Cassorla, Jonathan Anderson, and Mike Riddleberger.]

[Krystle Warren & The Faculty play at Rough Trade NYC 64 N 9th St, New York, New York, Friday, January 10, 2020 at 8 PM with Krystle Warren, Solomon Dorsey, Mike Riddleberger, Zach Djanikian, and Jacob Snider will play Faculty melodies new and old. With special guest, Calvin Arsenia.]

10:48 – Freedom.

MLK said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

14. Nina Simone -“I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”
from: Silk and Soul / RCA / 1967
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21, 1933. She died on April 21, 2003. Nina Simone was a singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist who worked in a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born in North Carolina, the sixth child of a preacher, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of the few supporters in her hometown of Tryon, North Carolina, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in NYC. Simone recorded more than 40 albums. “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free” is a gospel/jazz song written by Billy Taylor & “Dick Dallas.”]

15. Solomon Burke – “None Of Us Are Free”
from: Don’t Give Up On Me / Fat Possum / 2002
[Back up singers: The Blind Boys of Alabama. Born James Solomon McDonald, March 21, 1940, Solomon Burke died October 10, 2010. He was an American preacher & singer, who shaped the sound of rhythm & blues as one of the founding fathers of soul music in the 1960s and a “key transitional figure in the development of soul music from rhythm & blues. During the 55 years that he performed professionally, Burke released 38 studio albums on at least 17 record labels and had 35 singles that charted in the US, including 26 singles that made the Billboard R&B charts. In 2001, Burke was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a performer. His album Don’t Give Up on Me won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003. By 2005 Burke was credited with selling 17 million albums.]

16. Nina Simone – “I Shall Be Released”
from: To Love Somebody / RCA / 1967
[1 of 3 Bob Dylan songs Nina Simone performed for this album. Written by Dylan in 1967. The Band recorded the first officially-released version of the song for their 1968 debut album, Music from Big Pink, with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko & Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus. The song was also performed near the end of the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, The Last Waltz, in which all the night’s performers (except of Muddy Waters) plus Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood appeared on the same stage.]

11:02 – Station I.D.

11:02 – The Staple Singers & Bobby Watson and “Unpaid Bills”

MLK said, “In our glorious fight for civil rights, we must guard against being fooled by false slogans, as ‘right-to-work.’ It provides no ‘rights’ and no ‘works.’ Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining… We demand this fraud be stopped.”

17. Pops Staples – “You Gotta Serve Somebody”
from: e-town live volume 3 / e-town / December 18, 2002
[Recorded Sept. 16, 1994, Live in Boulder]
[Originally written by Bob Dylan. Roebuck “Pops” Staples was born on a cotton plantation near Winona, Mississippi, on Dec. 28, 1914, the youngest of 14 children. When growing up he heard, and began to play with, local blues guitarists such as Charlie Patton, who lived on the nearby Dockery Plantation, Robert Johnson, and Son House. He dropped out of school after the eighth grade, and sang with a gospel group before marrying and moving to Chicago in 1935. A “pivotal figure in gospel in the 1960s and 70s,” and an accomplished songwriter, guitarist and singer. Patriarch of The Staple Singers, which included his son Pervis and daughters Mavis, Yvonne, and Cleotha.]

18. Mavis Staples – “Down in Mississippi”
from: Live – Hope At The Hideout / Anti / 2008
[Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Mavis Staples, of The Staple Singers, is a celebrated equal rights activist. She’s performed at inaugural parties for Presidents Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Recorded in June, 2008, in the run up to the Presidential election of Barrack Obama. Recorded live in the intimate bar The Hideout, in her hometown of Chicago. Mavis Staples, marched, sang & protested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.]

19. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: Single / Stax (Fantasy / Ace) / 1967

20. Bobby Watson & The I Have a Dream Project–”Check Cashing Day” [feat. Glenn North]
from: Check Cashing Day / Lafiya Music / Aug. 28, 2013
[From wikipedia.org: “Bobby Watson was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1953. he is an American post-bop jazz alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. Watson now has 27 recordings as a leader. He appears on nearly 100 other recordings as either co-leader or in a supporting role. Watson has recorded more than 100 original compositions. Watson grew up in Bonner Springs and Kansas City, Kansas.]

[Bobby Watson plays The Lied Center in Lawrence, KS, on Friday, March 6, at 7:30 PM.]

[Congratulations to Glenn North for being the newly appointed Executive Director of Bruce R. Watkins Cultural Heritage Center.]

11:20 – Hard Times

21. Kelly Hunt – “Sunshine Long Overdue”
from: Even The Sparrow / Kelly Hunt / 2019
[The daughter of an opera singer and a saxophonist, Kelly Hunt was raised in Memphis, TN, and grew up performing other people’s works through piano lessons, singing in choirs, and performing theater. “It was a very creative, artistic household,” says Hunt. During her teenage years, influenced by musical inspirations as diverse as Norah Jones, Rachmaninov, and John Denver, she began writing her own songs on the piano as a creative outlet. After being introduced to the banjo in college while studying French and visual arts, Hunt began to develop her own improvised style of playing, combining old-time picking styles with the percussive origins of the instrument. “I’m self-taught, I just started letting the songs dictate what needed to be there,” she says. “I heard a rhythm in a song that I wanted to execute, so I figured out how to do it on the drum head while still being able to articulate certain notes in one motion.” After college, Hunt followed a rambling path that took her through careers in acting, graphic design, traditional French bread making, and medicine, all the while making music as a private endeavor. “I wanted to get serious about a responsible career choice, but music kept bubbling up. I was writing a lot and playing a lot and started to not be satisfied just playing to my walls of my room.” After moving to Kansas City and discovering her mysterious Depression-era tenor banjo, Hunt began recording Even The Sparrow in Kansas City alongside collaborator Stas’ Heaney and engineer Kelly Werts. “It took almost two years to record,” she says, “learning how to let the songs dictate the production.” Having finally come to light, the album displays Hunt’s penchant for masterful storytelling and intriguing arrangement, as researched and complex as they are memorable, punctuated by her articulate melodies and a well-enunciated and creative command of lyrical delivery infused with deft emotional communication. While reminiscent of modern traditionalists such as Gillian Welch–a number of her songs even borrow titles and phrasing from traditional American music (“Back to Dixie,” “Gloryland”)–Even The Sparrow reveals an ineffable quality that hovers beyond the constraints of genre, à la Anais Mitchell and Patty Griffin. In “The Men of Blue & Grey,” what begins as a Reconstruction-era ballad about the repurposing of Civil War glass plate negatives in a greenhouse roof soon becomes a meditation on the hope that growth and life may one day be able to emerge from the ruins of suffering and haunting of violence. “Across The Great Divide” turns an otherwise traditional accounting of spurned love into a philosophical epic of the ethics of forgiveness and freedom, evoking the ideas of Søren Kierkegaard and Walt Whitman.]

[Kelly Hunt plays Jayhawk Theatre, 720 SW Jackson St, Topeka, KS, Saturday, January 18 at 7:OO PM.]

[Kelly Hunt has been nominated for 2019 Album of the Year by Folk Alliance International International Folk Music Awards. Even The Sparrow was in the Top Ten of WMM’s 119 Best Recordings of 2019.]

22. Laura Love – “Hard Times”
from: You Ain’t Got No Easter Clothes / Koch / 2004
[Laura Love is an American singer-songwriter and bass guitar player. Her style has been described as “Afro-Celtic” and has also been influenced by bluegrass. Love was born Laura Jones in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1960. She is African American, Native American, and Caucasian. Love had a difficult childhood, raised by a mother with schizophrenia and in foster homes. Her father, who had little involvement in her life, was the jazz musician Preston Love who played the saxophone with Count Basie, Lucky Millinder and Johnny Otis and formed his own band in the 1950s. Love’s mother, Wini, had been a singer in Preston’s jazz band. Love began her performing career at age 16, singing for the prisoners at the Nebraska State Penitentiary. Love relocated to Seattle, Washington, where she was a member of the 1980s rock group Boom Boom G.I. She was also a member of an all-female band, Venus Envy. After Love released three albums on her own label, Octoroon Biography, Putumayo released a collection of her songs in 1995. Her 2003 album Welcome to Pagan Place included the controversial song “I Want You Gone”, about George W. Bush. In 2004 she published an autobiography, You Ain’t Got No Easter Clothes, with an accompanying album of the same name.][“Hard Times Come Again No More” (sometimes, “Hard Times”) is an American parlor song written by Stephen Foster. It was published in New York by Firth, Pond & Co. in 1854 as Foster’s Melodies No. 28. Well-known and popular in its day, both in America and Europe, the song asks the fortunate to consider the plight of the less fortunate and ends with one of Foster’s favorite images: “a pale drooping maiden”. The first audio recording was a wax cylinder by the Edison Manufacturing Company (Edison Gold Moulded 9120) in 1905. It has been recorded and performed numerous times since. The song is Roud Folk Song Index #2659.]

11:28 – Underwriting

11:30 – Brothers

23. Isley Brothers – “Brother, Brother, Brother”
from: Brotherhood / Hear Music / 2006
[The Isley Brothers are an American musical group originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, that started as a vocal trio consisting of brothers O’Kelly Isley Jr., Rudolph Isley and Ronald Isley. The group has been cited as having enjoyed one of the “longest, most influential, and most diverse careers in the pantheon of popular music”. Together with a fourth brother, Vernon, the group performed gospel music until Vernon’s death a few years after its formation. After moving to the New York City area in the late 1950s, the group had modest chart successes during their early years, first coming to prominence in 1959 with their fourth single, “Shout”, written by the three brothers. Initially a modest charted single, the song eventually sold over a million copies. Afterwards the group recorded for a variety of labels, including the top 20 single, “Twist and Shout” and the Motown single “This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak for You)”, before recording and issuing the Grammy Award-winning hit “It’s Your Thing” on their own label, T-Neck Records. Influenced by gospel and doo-wop music, the group began experimenting with different musical styles incorporating elements of rock and funk as well as pop balladry. The inclusion of younger brothers Ernie Isley (lead guitar, drums) and Marvin Isley (bass guitar), and Rudolph’s brother-in-law Chris Jasper (keyboards, synthesizers), in 1973 turned the original vocal trio into a complete band. For the next full decade, they recorded top-selling albums including The Heat Is On and Between the Sheets. The six-member band splintered in 1983, with Ernie, Marvin, and Chris Jasper forming the short-lived spinoff group Isley-Jasper-Isley. The oldest member, O’Kelly, died in 1986 and Rudolph and Ronald released a pair of albums as a duo before Rudolph retired to a life in the Christian ministry in 1989. Ronald reconvened the group two years later in 1991 with Ernie and Marvin; five years later, in 1996, Marvin Isley left the group due to complications of diabetes. The remaining duo of Ronald and Ernie achieved mainstream success with the albums Mission to Please (1996), Eternal (2001) and Body Kiss (2003). Eternal spawned the top twenty hit “Contagious”. As of 2019, the Isley Brothers continue to perform under the lineup of Ronald & Ernie. The Isley Brothers have had four Top 10 singles on the U.S. Billboard chart. Sixteen of their albums charted in the Top 40. 13 of those albums have been certified gold, platinum or multi-platinum by the RIAA. The brothers have been honored by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which inducted them in 1992. 5 years later, they were added to Hollywood’s Rockwalk, and in 2003 they were inducted to the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. They received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014.]

24. The Holmes Brothers – “Promised Land”
from: Promised Land / Rounder / 1997
[The Holmes Brothers were an American musical trio originally from Christchurch, Virginia. Mixing sounds from blues, soul, gospel, country, and rhythm & blues, they have released twelve studio albums, with three reaching the top 5 on the Billboard Blues Albums Chart. They have gained a following by playing regularly at summer folk, blues, gospel, and jazz festivals. They have recorded with Van Morrison, Peter Gabriel, Odetta, Phoebe Snow, Willie Nelson, Freddie Roulette, Rosanne Cash, Levon Helm and Joan Osborne, and have gigged all over the world—including performing for President Bill Clinton. They won the Blues Music Award from the Memphis-based Blues Foundation for Band of the Year in 2005 and for the Soul Blues Album of the Year in 2008. USA Today calls The Holmes Brothers’ music “Rootsy R&B, gospel and country. They are glorious, full of soul and surprises.” The New Yorker says, “The Holmes Brothers are capable of awesome achievements.”NPR adds, “Their voices are rough enough for a juke joint and smooth enough for church.]

25. The Chambers Brothers – “People Get Ready”
from: The Time Has Come / Columbia / 1967 [written by Curtis Mayfield]
[American psychedelic soul band, known for their 11-minute 1968 hit “Time Has Come Today”. The group was part of the wave of new music that integrated American blues and gospel traditions with modern psychedelic and rock elements. Their music has been kept alive through heavy use in film soundtracks. Originally from Carthage, Mississippi, the Chambers Brothers first honed their skills as members of the choir in their Baptist church. This set up ended in 1952 when the eldest brother George was drafted into the Army. George relocated to Los Angeles after his discharge, and his brothers soon settled there as well. As a foursome, they began performing gospel and folk throughout the Southern California region in 1954, but they more or less remained unknown until appearing in NYC in 1965. Consisting of George (September 26, 1931 – October 12, 2019) on washtub bass (later on Danelectro bass guitar), Lester (b. April 13, 1940) on harmonica, and Willie (b. March 3, 1938) and Joe (b. August 22, 1942) on guitar, the group started to venture outside the gospel circuit, playing at coffeehouses that booked folk acts. They played at places like The Ash Grove, a very popular Los Angeles folk club. It became one of their favorite haunts and brought them into contact with Hoyt Axton, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Reverend Gary Davis, and Barbara Dane. Dane became a great supporter, performing and recording with the brothers. With the addition of Brian Keenan (January 28, 1943 – October 5, 1985) on drums, Dane took them on tour with her and introduced them to Pete Seeger, who helped put the Chambers Brothers on the bill of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. One of the songs they performed, “I Got It”, appeared on the Newport Folk Festival 1965 compilation LP, which was issued on the Vanguard label. They were becoming more accepted in the folk community, but, like many on the folk circuit, were looking to electrify their music and develop a more rock & roll sound. Joe Chambers recalled in a May 1994 Goldmine article that people at the Newport Folk Festival were breaking down fences and rushing to the stage. “Newport had never seen or heard anything like that.” After the group finished and the crowd finally settled down, the MC came up and said “Whether you know it or not, that was rock ‘n’ roll.” That night they played at a post-concert party for festival performers and went to a recording session of the newly electrified Bob Dylan. Shortly after appearing at Newport, the group released its debut album, People Get Ready.]

11:45:43 – Gospel & Folk Music Carried the Message.

The closing set starts with the late Pete Seeger singing a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley he adapted and made famous, followed by Sarah Lee Guthrie, the granddaughter of Woody Guthrie, with Johnny Irion, singing a song called “Dr. King” written by Pete Seeger. We end with a song written by Woody Guthrie performed by the great Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings. Call it from Folk to Funky.

Keep The Dream Alive! We Shall Overcome!

26. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

27. Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion – “Dr. King”
from: exploration / New West / 2005 [written by Pete Seeger]
[Sarah Lee Guthrie was born February 17, 1979 and Johnny Irion was born February 3, 1969. They are a musical duo. Guthrie and Irion were married on October 16, 1999 and began performing together as an acoustic duo in the fall of 2000. Their music combined Irion’s love of rock and blues with Guthrie’s roots of folk and country. Guthrie is the youngest daughter of folksinger Arlo Guthrie and the granddaughter of Woody Guthrie. As a third generation singer/songwriter Guthrie released her first self-titled album on the family owned and operated Rising Son Records in 2002. As a child she was involved in theater and dance. Her interest in music was sparked when she worked as her father’s road manager on the 1997 Further Festival tour and saw other members of the tour group having fun at late-night hootenannies. She picked up an acoustic guitar and started playing as a way to join in on the fun. “I always wrote poems, so it wasn’t that far off for me to turn that into songs.” “My dad was absolutely thrilled, of course, and would teach me stuff every day when we were on the road together. That was a really cool way to get to know my dad, because I’d never known him that way. And that’s another thing that made it easy: my dad was so supportive.” Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion performing live for Valentine’s Day 2008 at Tales From The Tavern at The Maverick Saloon in Santa Ynez, CA. Irion originates from a family of artists. His uncle is author Thomas Steinbeck, his great uncle is author John Steinbeck, and his grandmother, Rubilee Knight, is a classical violinist. His late grandfather, Fred Knight, sang tenor in numerous venues. Irion and Guthrie met through a mutual friend (Chris Robinson of the Black Crowes) while the two were working together in Los Angeles. In 1999 Guthrie and Irion joined guitarist Tao Rodríguez-Seeger, grandson of Pete Seeger, and performed as a trio under the name RIG.]

28. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – “This Land is Your Land”
from: Naturally / Daptone / 2005
[written by Woody Guthrie, Sarah Lee’s Grandfather.]
[In November 2016, Sharon Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 United States presidential election results and another the following day. Jones remained alert and lucid during the initial period of her hospital stay, jokingly claiming that the news of Donald Trump’s victory was responsible for her stroke. She died on November 18, 2016, in Cooperstown, New York, aged 60. Sharon Lafaye Jones was born May 4, 1956 and died this year on November 18, 2016. She was an American soul and funk singer. Although she collaborated with Lou Reed, David Byrne and others, she is best known as lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old. In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy, in the category Best R&B Album, for Give the People What They Want. Jones was born in Augusta, Georgia, the daughter of Ella Mae Price Jones and Charlie Jones, living in adjacent North Augusta, South Carolina. Jones was the youngest of six children; her siblings are Dora, Charles, Ike, Willa and Henry. Jones’s mother raised her deceased sister’s four children as well as her own. She moved the family to New York City when Sharon was a young child. As children, she and her brothers would often imitate the singing and dancing of James Brown. Her mother happened to know Brown, who was also from Augusta.Jones grew up in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, she graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. She attended Brooklyn College. A regular gospel singer in church, Jones often entered talent shows backed by local funk bands in the early 1970s. Session work then continued with backing vocals, often credited to Lafaye Jones, but in the absence of any recording contract as a solo singer, she spent many years working as a corrections officer at Rikers Island and as an armored car guard for Wells Fargo, until receiving a mid-life career break in 1996 after she appeared on a session backing the soul and deep funk legend Lee Fields. Sharon Jones was part of the very beginning of Daptone Records Daptone Records’ first release was a full-length album by Sharon Jones. A new band, the Dap-Kings, was formed from the former members of the Soul Providers and the Mighty Imperials. Some of the musicians went on to record for Lehman’s Soul Fire label, while some formed the Budos Band, an Afro-beat band. From the original Soul Providers, Roth (also known as Bosco Mann) on bass, guitarist and emcee Binky Griptite, percussionist Fernando Velez, trumpet player Anda Szilagyi and organist Earl Maxton were joined by original Mighty Imperials saxophonist Leon Michels and drummer Homer Steinweiss, plus Neal Sugarman from Sugarman 3, to form The Dap-Kings. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, the released the album Dap Dippin’ with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in May of 2002, , for which they received immediate attention and acclaim from enthusiasts, DJs and collectors. Next they released, Naturally (2005), 100 Days, 100 Nights (2007) and I Learned the Hard Way (2010). They are seen by many as the spearhead of a revival of soul and funk.]

29. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

Next week, on January 22 we talk with Hadiza., Les Ismore, and Scott Hobart, plus we have a whole lot of NeW & MidCoastal Releases from Pedaljets, Una Walkenhorst, and more!

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #820

WMM Celebrates MLK

Wednesday MidDay Medley
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

“Remembering MLK”

WMM celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born January 15, 1929. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King’s efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. By the time of his death, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War, both from a religious perspective. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 1981.

Mark plays music of the movement from: Mavis Staples, Pops Staples, The Staple Singers, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project featuring Glenn North, Krystle Warren, Kelly Hunt, Laura Love, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Labelle, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Soweto Gospel Choir, International Noise Conspiracy, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, The Holmes Brothers, The Chambers Brothers, The Isley Brothers, Pete Seeger, and Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion.

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #820

WMM Playlist from Jan. 16, 2019

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

“Remembering MLK”

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / Universal / Dec. 20, 1979
[WMM’s theme]

2. Soweto Gospel Choir – “Pride (In The Name of Love)”
from: In the Name of Love – Africa Celebrates U2 / Shout! Factory Records / 2008
[Formed in Soweto, South Africa, by David Mulovhedzi & Beverly Bryer, two choir directors. The 30-member ensemble blends African gospel, Negro spirituals, reggae and American popular music. The group performed at the first of the 46664 concerts for Nelson Mandela and has toured internationally. Their albums Blessed and African Spirit won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2007 and 2008.]

3. International Noise Conspiracy / MLK Jr. – “The First Conspiracy / Let Freedom Ring”
from: Adbusters – Live Without Dead Time / Adbusters / 2003
[The (International) Noise Conspiracy (abbreviated T(I)NC) were a Swedish rock band formed in Sweden in the late months of 1998. The line-up consists of Dennis Lyxzén (vocals), Inge Johansson (bass), Lars Strömberg (guitar), and Ludwig Dahlberg (drums). The band is known for its punk and garage rock musical influences, and its impassioned left-wing political stance. Influenced by a quote from 1960’s folk singer Phil Ochs, according to lead singer Lyxzén, the band wanted to achieve an ideal blend of music and politics that was, “a cross between Elvis Presley and Che Guevara.”]

4. Labelle – “Something in The Air / The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”
from: Something Silver / Warner Archives / 1997 [orig. Pressure Cookin’ / 1973, 3rd album from the funk/soul trio of: Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx and Sarah Dash who each shared a rap on “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. It was the B-side to Scott-Heron’s first single, “Home Is Where the Hatred Is”, from his album Pieces of a Man (1971). “Something in the Air” is a song orig. recorded by Thunderclap Newman, a band created by Pete Townshend for The Who’s former roadie John ‘Speedy’ Keen who wrote and sang the song. It was a UK #1 single for three weeks in July 1969.]

10:10

Thanks for tuning into Wednesday MidDay Medley, today we celebrate the life of human rights icon, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born Jan. 15, 1929.

MLK led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, was a cofounder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, and served as it’s first president. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his, “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination thru civil disobedience and non-violent means.

By the time of his death in 1968, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War. King was assassinated, April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I. [B-day – Mon 15] [MLK Day – Mon. Jan. 15.]

As Pete Seeger wrote: “Songs gave them the courage to believe they would not fail.” Today we feature music of and inspired by the civil rights movement from: Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project (featuring Glenn North), Krystle Warren, Bob & Una Walkenhorst, Kelly Hunt, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, Pops Staples, Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, Pete Seeger, Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion. We started w/: Soweto Gospel Choir, The Intl. Noise Conspiracy, and Labelle.

And at 11:15, Kansas City based musicians Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst join us to share details about Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wednesday, January 16th, from 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand.

10:14 – Soul Brother…

MLK said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

MLK said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

5. Curtis Mayfield – “Beautiful Brother of Mine”
from: Roots / Curtom-Buddah / October, 1971 [2nd solo release from Curtis Mayfield, born in Chicago, June 3, 1942. One of the most influential musicians behind soul & politically conscious African-American music. Mayfield started his musical career in a gospel choir. Moving to the North Side of Chicago he met Jerry Butler in 1956 at the age of 14, and joined vocal group The Impressions. As a songwriter, Mayfield became noted as one of the first musicians to bring more prevalent themes of social awareness into soul music. In 1965, he wrote “People Get Ready” for The Impressions, which displayed his more politically charged songwriting. After leaving The Impressions in 1970, Mayfield released several albums, including the soundtrack for the blaxploitation film Super Fly in 1972. The soundtrack was noted for its socially conscious themes, mostly addressing problems surrounding inner city minorities such as crime, poverty and drug abuse. Mayfield was paralyzed from the neck down after lighting equipment fell on him during a live performance at Wingate Field in Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York, on August 13, 1990. Despite this, he continued his career as a recording artist, releasing his final album, New World Order, in 1996. Mayfield won a Grammy Legend Award in 1994 and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995, and was a double inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a member of the Impressions in 1991, and again in 1999 as a solo artist. He was also a 2-time Grammy Hall of Fame inductee. He died from complications of type 2 diabetes, Dec 26, 1999, at 57.]

6. Maceo & The Macks – “Soul Power ’74”
from: James Brown’s Funky People, Pt. 2 / People Records / 1988
[This record is sampled more than crackers and chees at Costco, it contains samples itself in the form of tape overlays of civil rights rallies, a Dr. King speech, and an announcement of King’s assassination. Maceo Parker played saxophone with James Brown, Parliment, Funkadelic, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and Prince.]

7. Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell & Spirit of Praise – “Ella’s Song”
from: Soundtrack to Boycott / HBO / 2001 [Critically acclaimed 2001 film staring Jeffrey Wright as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Terrence Howard as Ralph Abernathy, and CCH Pounder as Jo Ann Robinson.]

10:28 – Underwriting

10:30 – King’s Life, Death, and Spirit…

MLK said, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

8. Mahalia Jackson – “How I Got Over”
from: The Original Apollo Sessions / Couch & Madison Partners / May 25, 2013
[Gospel hymn composed & published in 1951 by Clara Ward (1924-1973). It was performed by Mahalia Jackson at the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 before 250,000 people. Mahalia Jackson (Oct. 26, 1911 – Jan. 27, 1972) was referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”. She became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world, heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist. She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”. She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers. “I sing God’s music because it makes me feel free,” Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, “It gives me hope. With the blues, when you finish, you still have the blues.”]

9. Martin Luther King Jr. – “MLK – I Have A Dream 1963 (excerpt)”
from: Inspirational Speeches, Vo. 3 / Orange Leisure / May 16, 2011 [American civil rights leader/activist and Baptist minister, born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King’s speeches have been issued on numerous releases – his most well-known and influential address being “I Have a Dream”, which was held during “The March on Washington” in 1963. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.]

10. Marian Anderson – “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
from: He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands / BMG / Orig. 1961 [Reissued 1991]
[Marian Anderson (Feb 27, 1897 – Apr. 8, 1993) was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century. In 1939, the (DAR) refused to let Anderson sing in Constitution Hall. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson became the first black person, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC on Jan. 7, 1955. Anderson worked as a delegate to the UN Human Rights Committee and “goodwill ambassadress” for the U.S. Dept. of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.]

11. Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter & Chorus -“Rocka My Soul”
from: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre “Revelations” / V2 / 1998
[Revelations is the signature choreographic work of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. It was first produced by Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City, New York on January 31, 1960. Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom through a suite of dances set to spirituals and blues music. It’s been performed in over 70 countries in the half century since then and has been described as “the most widely seen modern dance work in the world.” The finale song of the three part “Revelations” is “Rocka My Soul In The Bosom Of Abraham” and it has been described by writer Juliana Lewis-Ferguson as a, “spiritually powerful conclusion to the suite and a purely physical release of emotion.”]

10:41

12. The Swan Silvertones – “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep”
from: Platinum Gospel: The Swan Silvertones / Sonorous Entertainment / 2012 (1959)
[“Mary Don’t You Weep” (alternately titled “O Mary Don’t You Weep”, “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep, Don’t You Mourn”, or variations thereof) is a Negro spiritual that originates from before the American Civil War – thus it is what scholars call a “slave song,” “a label that describes their origins among the enslaved,” and it contains “coded messages of hope and resistance.” It is one of the most important of Negro spirituals. The song tells the Biblical story of Mary of Bethany and her distraught pleas to Jesus to raise her brother Lazarus from the dead. Other narratives relate to The Exodus and the Passage of the Red Sea, with the chorus proclaiming Pharaoh’s army got drown-ded!, and to God’s rainbow covenant to Noah after the Great Flood. With liberation thus one of its themes, the song again become popular during the Civil Rights Movement. Additionally, a song that explicitly chronicles the victories of the Civil Rights Movement, “If You Miss Me from the Back of the Bus”, written by Charles Neblett of The Freedom Singers, was sung to this tune and became one of the most well-known songs of that movement. In 2015 it was announced that The Swan Silvertones’s version of the song will be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”. The first recording of the song was by the Fisk Jubilee Singers in 1915. The best known recordings were made by the vocal gospel group The Caravans in 1958, with Inez Andrews as the lead singer, and The Swan Silvertones in 1959. “Mary Don’t You Weep” became The Swan Silvertones’ greatest hit, and lead singer Claude Jeter’s interpolation “I’ll be a bridge over deep water if you trust in my name” served as Paul Simon’s inspiration to write his 1970 song “Bridge over Troubled Water”.The spiritual’s lyric God gave Noah the rainbow sign, no more water the fire next time inspired the title for The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s 1963 account of race relations in America.]

13. Krystle Warren – “Red Clay”
from: Three The Hard Way / Parlour Door Music / August 18, 2017
[Produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones. Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections.] [Krystle Warren was on WMM on September 20. We played her music on 12 different shows.]

10:48 – Freedom…

MLK said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

14. Nina Simone -“I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”
from: Silk and Soul / RCA / 1967
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21, 1933. She died on April 21, 2003. Nina Simone was a singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist who worked in a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born in North Carolina, the sixth child of a preacher, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of the few supporters in her hometown of Tryon, North Carolina, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in NYC. Simone recorded more than 40 albums. “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free” is a gospel/jazz song written by Billy Taylor & “Dick Dallas.”]

15. Solomon Burke – “None Of Us Are Free”
from: Don’t Give Up On Me / Fat Possum / 2002
[Back up singers: The Blind Boys of Alabama. Born James Solomon McDonald, March 21, 1940, Solomon Burke died October 10, 2010. He was an American preacher & singer, who shaped the sound of rhythm & blues as one of the founding fathers of soul music in the 1960s and a “key transitional figure in the development of soul music from rhythm & blues. During the 55 years that he performed professionally, Burke released 38 studio albums on at least 17 record labels and had 35 singles that charted in the US, including 26 singles that made the Billboard R&B charts. In 2001, Burke was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a performer. His album Don’t Give Up on Me won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003. By 2005 Burke was credited with selling 17 million albums.]

16. Nina Simone – “I Shall Be Released”
from: To Love Somebody / RCA / 1967
[1 of 3 Bob Dylan songs Nina Simone performed for this album. Written by Dylan in 1967. The Band recorded the first officially-released version of the song for their 1968 debut album, Music from Big Pink, with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko & Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus. The song was also performed near the end of the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, The Last Waltz, in which all the night’s performers (except of Muddy Waters) plus Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood appeared on the same stage.]

11:02 – Station I.D.

11:02 – The Staple Singers & Bobby Watson and “Unpaid Bills”

MLK said, “In our glorious fight for civil rights, we must guard against being fooled by false slogans, as ‘right-to-work.’ It provides no ‘rights’ and no ‘works.’ Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining… We demand this fraud be stopped.”

17. Pops Staples – “You Gotta Serve Somebody”
from: e-town live volume 3 / e-town / December 18, 2002 \[Recorded Sept. 16, 1994, Live in Boulder][Originally written by Bob Dylan. Roebuck “Pops” Staples was born on a cotton plantation near Winona, Mississippi, on Dec. 28, 1914, the youngest of 14 children. When growing up he heard, and began to play with, local blues guitarists such as Charlie Patton, who lived on the nearby Dockery Plantation, Robert Johnson, and Son House. He dropped out of school after the eighth grade, and sang with a gospel group before marrying and moving to Chicago in 1935. A “pivotal figure in gospel in the 1960s and 70s,” and an accomplished songwriter, guitarist and singer. Patriarch of The Staple Singers, which included his son Pervis and daughters Mavis, Yvonne, and Cleotha.]

18. Mavis Staples – “Down in Mississippi”
from: Live – Hope At The Hideout / Anti / 2008
[Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Mavis Staples, of The Staple Singers, is a celebrated equal rights activist. She’s performed at inaugural parties for Presidents Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Recorded in June, 2008, in the run up to the Presidential election of Barrack Obama. Recorded live in the intimate bar The Hideout, in her hometown of Chicago. Mavis Staples, marched, sang & protested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.]

19. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: Single / Stax (Fantasy / Ace) / 1967

20. Bobby Watson & The I Have a Dream Project–”Check Cashing Day” [feat. Glenn North]
from: Check Cashing Day / Lafiya Music / Digital – Aug. 28, 2013 / Physical – Nov. 12, 2013
[From wikipedia.org: “Bobby Watson was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1953. he is an American post-bop jazz alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. Watson now has 27 recordings as a leader. He appears on nearly 100 other recordings as either co-leader or in a supporting role. Watson has recorded more than 100 original compositions. Watson grew up in Bonner Springs and Kansas City, Kansas.]

21. Kelly Hunt – “Sunshine Long Overdue”
from: Even The Sparrow / Kelly Hunt / 2019

11:23 – Interview with Kelly Hunt & Una Walkenhorst

Kansas City based musicians Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst join us to share details about Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wed, January 16th, from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand.

Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst, thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wed, January 16th, from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand.

The series continues with Scott Hrabko on March 6, Mikal Shapiro on April 11, and Sara Morgan on May 22.

The performances will also feature Kelly’s longtime co-conspirator multi-instrumentalist Stas’ Heaney and an occasional rotating band of local musicians.

The format may vary some but will include an opening set by each evening’s guest artist songwriter ending with a multi-song collaboration with Kelly followed by a long set of Hunt’s own music freely explored and configured as she sees fit. The residency is intended as an exercise in principles Hunt says guide her creative approach.

“When the opportunity for a residency at The recordBar came up, I knew I wanted to do something different with it. Lately, I’ve been gravitating towards new instruments, new styles of writing, arranging and performing. I’ve been craving a public stage that facilitates experimentation, collaboration and community. A place to air out brand new—even unfinished—songs within the context of live performance: a laboratory of sorts. This series is designed to encourage that kind of creative space for both performer and listener—to give the songwriter a unique sounding board for new ideas, and to invite the listener to participate in that creative process. Every show in this series will be unique. I’m excited to be joined by some of my favorite local songwriters and musicians onstage, and to finally give voice to songs and ideas that have been waiting in the wings for a long time,” said Hunt.

Information at: http://www.therecordbar.com.

Hunt’s stellar debut album, “Even The Sparrow,” is already getting rave advance reaction prior to it’s international release projected for the end of Q1 2019.

“Hunt applies her haunting voice and evocative banjo playing to songs that build on the work of contemporary masters like Gillian Welch.”
– THE KANSAS CITY STAR.

“…the combination of Hunt’s exceptional voice and exquisitely spare instrumentation is stunning.”
– Bill Brownlee THERE STANDS THE GLASS.

Una Walkenhorst shows:

Songwriters Showcase at Records with Merritt
Friday, January 25, at 7:00 PM – Records with Merritt, 1614 Westport Rd, KCMO
Una Walkenhorst, Teri Quinn, Joel Stratton, Nina Lee Cherry

Survivors Stories (A MOCSA Benefit)
FEBRUARY 28, 2019, with support from Fine Dining Productions and the Johnson County Mental Health Center, The Rino will be hosting a very special event benefiting MOCSA. the Metropolitan Organization to Counteract Sexual Assualt. The evening will consist of a curated lineup of performers offering songs, poetry, and other performance art pieces that touch on their experience with sexual assault. The goals for this event are to provide a safe space where survivors can heal, connect, and be given access to the services they may need, and to raise funds and awareness for the important work MOCSA is doing in our community. The event will also provide a chance for those who have not dealt with sexual assault, violence, or harassment to further understand what it means to be a survivor. SEEKING SUBMISSIONS – DEADLINE JANUARY 31, 2019

Bob & Una Walkenhorst Live At The Westsider
Friday, February 1, at 7:00 PM – Mike Kelly’s Westsider. KCMO

Bob & Una Walkenhorst with Brewer & Shipley
Saturday, February 9, at 8:00 PM – Liberty Hall, Lawrence, KS

Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst, thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Kelly Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wednesday, January 16th, from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand. More infomation at: http://www.therecordbar.com.

11:39

22. Bob & Una Walkenhorst – “Get On The Bus”
from: For Tomorrow / BAT Records / October 12, 2018
[25 year old Una Walkenhorst is a singer/songwriter from KC. Following the release of her debut album “Scars” in 2014, Una immediately had “new fans. . . coming out of the proverbial woodwork” (AXS). Paired with refreshingly raw vocals, Una’s heartfelt lyrics “will stop you in your tracks (at once beautiful and chilling),” wrote Gilded Palace Radio, as she weaves stories of genuine human experience. Una told KCUR FM that her father was one of the people who made her love music. But having a famous father can be challenging: “I knew that if I started my music career here I would have a lot of opportunities, but not all of them would be because of my music. They would be because I am someone’s daughter,” Walkenhorst says. Loading up her 97 Honda Civic, Una then spent a year traveling across North America promoting her music and connecting with listeners one-on-one. She ended up living in New Orleans. Una Walkenhorst is the youngest daughter of Bob Walkenhorst, a founding member of The Rainmakers, which had national and international hits in the 1980s and 90s, and continue to this day touring and recording new music. In January of 2018 Una Walkenhorst returned home to Kansas City from New Orleans. Over the past several years, Una and Bob had performed together at selected events, including Folk Alliance International. This year the father and daughter duo decided to record an album together, where they split the difference, taking turns as songwriters for the album’s songs, written individually, and recorded together, in clear beautiful harmonies, with that extra special shared musical DNA, that can be heard in the harmonies of The Carter Family, Madisen Ward and the Mama Bear, or Shy Boys.]

11:40 – Underwriting

11:45 – Gospel & Folk Music Carried the Message…

23. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

24. Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion – “Dr. King”
from: exploration / New West / 2005 [written by Pete Seeger]

25. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – “This Land is Your Land”
from: Naturally / Daptone / 2005
[written by Woody Guthrie, Sarah Lee’s Grandfather.] [In November 2016, Sharon Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 United States presidential election results and another the following day. Jones remained alert and lucid during the initial period of her hospital stay, jokingly claiming that the news of Donald Trump’s victory was responsible for her stroke. She died on November 18, 2016, in Cooperstown, New York, aged 60. Sharon Lafaye Jones was born May 4, 1956 and died this year on November 18, 2016. She was an American soul and funk singer. Although she collaborated with Lou Reed, David Byrne and others, she is best known as lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old. In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy, in the category Best R&B Album, for Give the People What They Want. Jones was born in Augusta, Georgia, the daughter of Ella Mae Price Jones and Charlie Jones, living in adjacent North Augusta, South Carolina. Jones was the youngest of six children; her siblings are Dora, Charles, Ike, Willa and Henry. Jones’s mother raised her deceased sister’s four children as well as her own. She moved the family to New York City when Sharon was a young child. As children, she and her brothers would often imitate the singing and dancing of James Brown. Her mother happened to know Brown, who was also from Augusta.Jones grew up in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, she graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. She attended Brooklyn College. A regular gospel singer in church, Jones often entered talent shows backed by local funk bands in the early 1970s. Session work then continued with backing vocals, often credited to Lafaye Jones, but in the absence of any recording contract as a solo singer, she spent many years working as a corrections officer at Rikers Island and as an armored car guard for Wells Fargo, until receiving a mid-life career break in 1996 after she appeared on a session backing the soul and deep funk legend Lee Fields. Sharon Jones was part of the very beginning of Daptone Records Daptone Records’ first release was a full-length album by Sharon Jones. A new band, the Dap-Kings, was formed from the former members of the Soul Providers and the Mighty Imperials. Some of the musicians went on to record for Lehman’s Soul Fire label, while some formed the Budos Band, an Afro-beat band. From the original Soul Providers, Roth (also known as Bosco Mann) on bass, guitarist and emcee Binky Griptite, percussionist Fernando Velez, trumpet player Anda Szilagyi and organist Earl Maxton were joined by original Mighty Imperials saxophonist Leon Michels and drummer Homer Steinweiss, plus Neal Sugarman from Sugarman 3, to form The Dap-Kings. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, the released the album Dap Dippin’ with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in May of 2002, , for which they received immediate attention and acclaim from enthusiasts, DJs and collectors. Next they released, Naturally (2005), 100 Days, 100 Nights (2007) and I Learned the Hard Way (2010). They are seen by many as the spearhead of a revival of soul and funk.]

26. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

Next Week on Wednesday, January 23 we talk with Logan Glasgow of the band Verbose and Eric Kleiner of the band Headlight Rivals who both play The MidCoast Takeover Fundraiser #1 Friday, January 25, at recordBar, ALSO Chloe Jacobson joins us live in our 90.1 FM Studios, PLUS, Ryan Jamaal Davis AKA Kadesh Flow joins us to share new music.

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #769

Wednesday MidDay Medley Remembers MLK

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

“Remembering MLK”

Wednesday MidDay Medley celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born January 15, 1929. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King’s efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. By the time of his death, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War, both from a religious perspective. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I.

Mark plays music of the movement from: Mavis Staples, Pops Staples, The Staple Singers, Krystle Warren, Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project featuring Glenn North, Bob & Una Walkenhorst, Kelly Hunt, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Labelle, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Soweto Gospel Choir, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, Pete Seeger, and Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion.

At 11:15 KC based musicians Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst share details about Hunt’s new SongCraft Sessions series, starting January 16, at 7:00, at recordBar, 1520 Grand, with Una Walkenhorst, followed by Scott Hrabko on March 6, Mikal Shapiro on April 11, and Sara Morgan on May 22. The performances will also feature Kelly’s longtime co-conspirator multi-instrumentalist Stas’ Heaney and an occasional rotating band of local musicians. In describing this new series Kelly Hunt said, “When the opportunity for a residency at The recordBar came up, I knew I wanted to do something different with it. Lately, I’ve been gravitating towards new instruments, new styles of writing, arranging and performing. I’ve been craving a public stage that facilitates experimentation, collaboration and community. A place to air out brand new—even unfinished—songs within the context of live performance: a laboratory of sorts. This series is designed to encourage that kind of creative space for both performer and listener—to give the songwriter a unique sounding board for new ideas, and to invite the listener to participate in that creative process. Adv. tickets are $10 and available online at: http://www.therecordbar.com.

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #769

WMM Playlist from January 10, 2018

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

“Remembering MLK”

Wednesday MidDay Medley celebrates the life of human rights icon, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born Jan. 15, 1929.

MLK led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, was a cofounder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, and served as it’s first president. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his, “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination thru civil disobedience and non-violent means.

By the time of his death in 1968, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War. King was assassinated, April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I. This year this national holiday falls on his actual birthday, Monday, January 15.

As Pete Seeger wrote: “Songs gave them the courage to believe they would not fail.” Today we feature music of & inspired by the civil rights movement.

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / Universal / Dec. 20, 1979 [WMM’s theme]

2. Soweto Gospel Choir – “Pride (In The Name of Love)”
from: In the Name of Love – Africa Celebrates U2 / Shout! Factory Records / 2008
[Formed in Soweto, South Africa, by David Mulovhedzi & Beverly Bryer, two choir directors. The 30-member ensemble blends African gospel, Negro spirituals, reggae and American popular music. The group performed at the first of the 46664 concerts for Nelson Mandela and has toured internationally. Their albums Blessed and African Spirit won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2007 and 2008.]

3. International Noise Conspiracy / MLK Jr. – “The First Conspiracy / Let Freedom Ring”
from: Adbusters – Live Without Dead Time / Adbusters / 2003
[The (International) Noise Conspiracy (abbreviated T(I)NC) were a Swedish rock band formed in Sweden in the late months of 1998. The line-up consists of Dennis Lyxzén (vocals), Inge Johansson (bass), Lars Strömberg (guitar), and Ludwig Dahlberg (drums). The band is known for its punk and garage rock musical influences, and its impassioned left-wing political stance. Influenced by a quote from 1960’s folk singer Phil Ochs, according to lead singer Lyxzén, the band wanted to achieve an ideal blend of music and politics that was, “a cross between Elvis Presley and Che Guevara.”]

4. Labelle – “Something in The Air / The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”
from: Something Silver / Warner Archives / 1997 [orig. Pressure Cookin’ / 1973, 3rd album from the funk/soul trio of: Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx and Sarah Dash who each shared a rap on “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. It was the B-side to Scott-Heron’s first single, “Home Is Where the Hatred Is”, from his album Pieces of a Man (1971). “Something in the Air” is a song orig. recorded by Thunderclap Newman, a band created by Pete Townshend for The Who’s former roadie John ‘Speedy’ Keen who wrote and sang the song. It was a UK #1 single for three weeks in July 1969.]

10:14 – Soul Brother

MLK said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

MLK said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

5. Curtis Mayfield – “Beautiful Brother of Mine”
from: Roots / Curtom-Buddah / October, 1971 [2nd solo release from Curtis Mayfield, born in Chicago, June 3, 1942. One of the most influential musicians behind soul & politically conscious African-American music. Mayfield started his musical career in a gospel choir. Moving to the North Side of Chicago he met Jerry Butler in 1956 at the age of 14, and joined vocal group The Impressions. As a songwriter, Mayfield became noted as one of the first musicians to bring more prevalent themes of social awareness into soul music. In 1965, he wrote “People Get Ready” for The Impressions, which displayed his more politically charged songwriting. After leaving The Impressions in 1970, Mayfield released several albums, including the soundtrack for the blaxploitation film Super Fly in 1972. The soundtrack was noted for its socially conscious themes, mostly addressing problems surrounding inner city minorities such as crime, poverty and drug abuse. Mayfield was paralyzed from the neck down after lighting equipment fell on him during a live performance at Wingate Field in Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York, on August 13, 1990. Despite this, he continued his career as a recording artist, releasing his final album, New World Order, in 1996. Mayfield won a Grammy Legend Award in 1994 and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995, and was a double inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a member of the Impressions in 1991, and again in 1999 as a solo artist. He was also a 2-time Grammy Hall of Fame inductee. He died from complications of type 2 diabetes, Dec 26, 1999, at 57.]

6. Maceo & The Macks – “Soul Power ’74”
from: James Brown’s Funky People, Pt. 2 / People Records / 1988
[This record is sampled more than crackers and chees at Costco, it contains samples itself in the form of tape overlays of civil rights rallies, a Dr. King speech, and an announcement of King’s assassination. Maceo Parker played saxophone with James Brown, Parliment, Funkadelic, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and Prince.]

7. Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell & Spirit of Praise -“Ella’s Song”
from: Soundtrack to Boycott / HBO / 2001 [Critically acclaimed 2001 film staring Jeffrey Wright as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Terrence Howard as Ralph Abernathy, and CCH Pounder as Jo Ann Robinson.]

10:28 – Underwriting

10:30 – King’s Life, Death, and Spirit

MLK said, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

8. Common & John Legend – “Glory”
from: Selma (Music from the Motion Picture) / Paramount Pictures-Pathe / January 6, 2015
[Golden Globe winning song from the new motion picture Selma. Most of the millions of African Americans across the South had effectively been disenfranchised since the turn of the century by a series of discriminatory requirements and practices. Finding resistance by white officials to be intractable, even after passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This led to the three Selma to Montgomery marches in 1965 where Dallas County Voters League (DCVL) were joined by organizers from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committeeand also invited Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and activists of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to join them. These marches were part of the Selma Voting Rights Campaign and led to the passage that year of the Voting Rights Act, a landmark federal achievement of the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. The 54-mile highway from Selma to the Alabama state capital of Montgomery was a demonstration showing the desire of black American citizens to exercise their constitutional right to vote, in defiance of segregationist repression.]

9. Mahalia Jackson – “How I Got Over”
from: The Original Apollo Sessions / Couch & Madison Partners / May 25, 2013
[Gospel hymn composed & published in 1951 by Clara Ward (1924-1973). It was performed by Mahalia Jackson at the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 before 250,000 people. Mahalia Jackson (Oct. 26, 1911 – Jan. 27, 1972) was referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”. She became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world, heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist. She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”. She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers. “I sing God’s music because it makes me feel free,” Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, “It gives me hope. With the blues, when you finish, you still have the blues.”]

10. Martin Luther King Jr. – “MLK – I Have A Dream 1963 (excerpt)”
from: Inspirational Speeches, Vo. 3 / Orange Leisure / May 16, 2011 [American civil rights leader/activist and Baptist minister, born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King’s speeches have been issued on numerous releases – his most well-known and influential address being “I Have a Dream”, which was held during “The March on Washington” in 1963. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.]

11. Marian Anderson – “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
from: He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands / BMG / Orig. 1961 [Reissued 1991]
[Marian Anderson (Feb 27, 1897 – Apr. 8, 1993) was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century. In 1939, the (DAR) refused to let Anderson sing in Constitution Hall. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson became the first black person, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC on Jan. 7, 1955. Anderson worked as a delegate to the UN Human Rights Committee and “goodwill ambassadress” for the U.S. Dept. of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.]

12. Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter & Chorus -“Rocka My Soul”
from: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre “Revelations” / V2 / 1998
[Revelations is the signature choreographic work of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. It was first produced by Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City, New York on January 31, 1960. Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom through a suite of dances set to spirituals and blues music. It’s been performed in over 70 countries in the half century since then and has been described as “the most widely seen modern dance work in the world.” The finale song of the three part “Revelations” is “Rocka My Soul In The Bosom Of Abraham” and it has been described by writer Juliana Lewis-Ferguson as a, “spiritually powerful conclusion to the suite and a purely physical release of emotion.”]

10:47 – Freedom

MLK said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

13. Nina Simone -“I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”
from: Silk and Soul / RCA / 1967
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21, 1933. She died on April 21, 2003. Nina Simone was a singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist who worked in a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born in North Carolina, the sixth child of a preacher, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of the few supporters in her hometown of Tryon, North Carolina, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in NYC. Simone recorded more than 40 albums. “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free” is a gospel/jazz song written by Billy Taylor & “Dick Dallas.”]

14. Solomon Burke – “None Of Us Are Free”
from: Don’t Give Up On Me / Fat Possum / 2002
[Back up singers: The Blind Boys of Alabama. Born James Solomon McDonald, March 21, 1940, Solomon Burke died October 10, 2010. He was an American preacher & singer, who shaped the sound of rhythm & blues as one of the founding fathers of soul music in the 1960s and a “key transitional figure in the development of soul music from rhythm & blues. During the 55 years that he performed professionally, Burke released 38 studio albums on at least 17 record labels and had 35 singles that charted in the US, including 26 singles that made the Billboard R&B charts. In 2001, Burke was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a performer. His album Don’t Give Up on Me won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003. By 2005 Burke was credited with selling 17 million albums.]

15. Nina Simone – “I Shall Be Released”
from: To Love Somebody / RCA / 1967
[1 of 3 Bob Dylan songs Nina Simone performed for this album. Written by Dylan in 1967. The Band recorded the first officially-released version of the song for their 1968 debut album, Music from Big Pink, with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko & Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus. The song was also performed near the end of the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, The Last Waltz, in which all the night’s performers (except of Muddy Waters) plus Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood appeared on the same stage.]

11:02 – Station I.D.

11:02 – The Staple Singers & Bobby Watson and “Unpaid Bills”

MLK said, “In our glorious fight for civil rights, we must guard against being fooled by false slogans, as ‘right-to-work.’ It provides no ‘rights’ and no ‘works.’ Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining… We demand this fraud be stopped.”

16. Pops Staples – “You Gotta Serve Somebody”
from: e-town live volume 3 / e-town / December 18, 2002
[Recorded Sept. 16, 1994, Live in Boulder]
[Originally written by Bob Dylan. Roebuck “Pops” Staples was born on a cotton plantation near Winona, Mississippi, on Dec. 28, 1914, the youngest of 14 children. When growing up he heard, and began to play with, local blues guitarists such as Charlie Patton, who lived on the nearby Dockery Plantation, Robert Johnson, and Son House. He dropped out of school after the eighth grade, and sang with a gospel group before marrying and moving to Chicago in 1935. A “pivotal figure in gospel in the 1960s and 70s,” and an accomplished songwriter, guitarist and singer. Patriarch of The Staple Singers, which included his son Pervis and daughters Mavis, Yvonne, and Cleotha.]

17. Mavis Staples – “Down in Mississippi”
from: Live – Hope At The Hideout / Anti / 2008 [Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Mavis Staples, of The Staple Singers, is a celebrated equal rights activist. She’s performed at inaugural parties for Presidents Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Recorded in June, 2008, in the run up to the Presidential election of Barrack Obama. Recorded live in the intimate bar The Hideout, in her hometown of Chicago. Mavis Staples, marched, sang & protested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.]

18. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: Single / Stax (Fantasy / Ace) / 1967

19. Bobby Watson & The I Have a Dream Project–”Check Cashing Day” [feat. Glenn North]
from: Check Cashing Day / Lafiya Music / Digital – Aug. 28, 2013 / Physical – Nov. 12, 2013
[From wikipedia.org: “Bobby Watson was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1953. he is an American post-bop jazz alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. Watson now has 27 recordings as a leader. He appears on nearly 100 other recordings as either co-leader or in a supporting role. Watson has recorded more than 100 original compositions. Watson grew up in Bonner Springs and Kansas City, Kansas.]

11:21 – Bands of Brothers

MLK said, “Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can’t ride you unless your back is bent.”

20. Isley Brothers – “Brother, Brother, Brother”
from: Brotherhood / Hear Music / 2006

23. The Holmes Brothers – “Promised Land”
from: Promised Land / Rounder / 1997

24. The Chambers Brothers – “People Get Ready”
from: The Time Has Come / Columbia / 1967 [written by Curtis Mayfield]

11:33 – Underwriting

11:35 – Music tells the Story

MLK said, “History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.”

15. Thelonius Monk Septet – “Abide With Me”
from: Monk’s Music / Riverside / 1957 [written by William Henry Monk, an organist, church musician, and music editor, born March 16, 1823 and died March 18, 1889. He composed a fair number of popular hymns, including one of the most famous from nineteenth century England, “Eventide,” used for the hymn “Abide with Me.” He also wrote a number of anthems.]

22. The Swan Silvertones – “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep”
from: Platinum Gospel: The Swan Silvertones / Sonorous Entertainment / 2012 (1959)
[“Mary Don’t You Weep” (alternately titled “O Mary Don’t You Weep”, “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep, Don’t You Mourn”, or variations thereof) is a Negro spiritual that originates from before the American Civil War – thus it is what scholars call a “slave song,” “a label that describes their origins among the enslaved,” and it contains “coded messages of hope and resistance.” It is one of the most important of Negro spirituals. The song tells the Biblical story of Mary of Bethany and her distraught pleas to Jesus to raise her brother Lazarus from the dead. Other narratives relate to The Exodus and the Passage of the Red Sea, with the chorus proclaiming Pharaoh’s army got drown-ded!, and to God’s rainbow covenant to Noah after the Great Flood. With liberation thus one of its themes, the song again become popular during the Civil Rights Movement. Additionally, a song that explicitly chronicles the victories of the Civil Rights Movement, “If You Miss Me from the Back of the Bus”, written by Charles Neblett of The Freedom Singers, was sung to this tune and became one of the most well-known songs of that movement. In 2015 it was announced that The Swan Silvertones’s version of the song will be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”. The first recording of the song was by the Fisk Jubilee Singers in 1915. The best known recordings were made by the vocal gospel group The Caravans in 1958, with Inez Andrews as the lead singer, and The Swan Silvertones in 1959. “Mary Don’t You Weep” became The Swan Silvertones’ greatest hit, and lead singer Claude Jeter’s interpolation “I’ll be a bridge over deep water if you trust in my name” served as Paul Simon’s inspiration to write his 1970 song “Bridge over Troubled Water”.The spiritual’s lyric God gave Noah the rainbow sign, no more water the fire next time inspired the title for The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s 1963 account of race relations in America.]

30. Krystle Warren – “Red Clay”
from: Three The Hard Way / Parlour Door Music / August 18, 2017
[With this song Krystle Warren tells the story of the Tulsa Race Riots of 1921 in which hundreds of African Americans were murdered, and their community was fire bombed, and burned to the ground, from the sky, by the Ku Klux Klan. Thousands of victims were also jailed and imprisoned. Three The Hard Way was produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones. Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections.] [Krystle Warren was on WMM on September 20. We played her music on 12 different shows.]

11:45 – Gospel & Folk Music Carried the Message

We go out with a special set of music starting with the late Pete Seeger singing a song he adapted and made famous, followed by Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion, the granddaughter of Woody Guthrie singing a Pete Seeger song called “Dr. King,” and ending with a song written by Woody Guthrie performed by Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings

MLK said, “It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that’s pretty important.”

21. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

22. Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion – “Dr. King”
from: exploration / New West / 2005 [written by Pete Seeger]

23. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – “This Land is Your Land”
from: Naturally / Daptone / 2005
[written by Woody Guthrie, Sarah Lee’s Grandfather.]
[In November 2016, Sharon Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 United States presidential election results and another the following day. Jones remained alert and lucid during the initial period of her hospital stay, jokingly claiming that the news of Donald Trump’s victory was responsible for her stroke. She died on November 18, 2016, in Cooperstown, New York, aged 60. Sharon Lafaye Jones was born May 4, 1956 and died this year on November 18, 2016. She was an American soul and funk singer. Although she collaborated with Lou Reed, David Byrne and others, she is best known as lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old. In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy, in the category Best R&B Album, for Give the People What They Want. Jones was born in Augusta, Georgia, the daughter of Ella Mae Price Jones and Charlie Jones, living in adjacent North Augusta, South Carolina. Jones was the youngest of six children; her siblings are Dora, Charles, Ike, Willa and Henry. Jones’s mother raised her deceased sister’s four children as well as her own. She moved the family to New York City when Sharon was a young child. As children, she and her brothers would often imitate the singing and dancing of James Brown. Her mother happened to know Brown, who was also from Augusta.Jones grew up in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, she graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. She attended Brooklyn College. A regular gospel singer in church, Jones often entered talent shows backed by local funk bands in the early 1970s. Session work then continued with backing vocals, often credited to Lafaye Jones, but in the absence of any recording contract as a solo singer, she spent many years working as a corrections officer at Rikers Island and as an armored car guard for Wells Fargo, until receiving a mid-life career break in 1996 after she appeared on a session backing the soul and deep funk legend Lee Fields. Sharon Jones was part of the very beginning of Daptone Records Daptone Records’ first release was a full-length album by Sharon Jones. A new band, the Dap-Kings, was formed from the former members of the Soul Providers and the Mighty Imperials. Some of the musicians went on to record for Lehman’s Soul Fire label, while some formed the Budos Band, an Afro-beat band. From the original Soul Providers, Roth (also known as Bosco Mann) on bass, guitarist and emcee Binky Griptite, percussionist Fernando Velez, trumpet player Anda Szilagyi and organist Earl Maxton were joined by original Mighty Imperials saxophonist Leon Michels and drummer Homer Steinweiss, plus Neal Sugarman from Sugarman 3, to form The Dap-Kings. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, the released the album Dap Dippin’ with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in May of 2002, , for which they received immediate attention and acclaim from enthusiasts, DJs and collectors. Next they released, Naturally (2005), 100 Days, 100 Nights (2007) and I Learned the Hard Way (2010). They are seen by many as the spearhead of a revival of soul and funk.]

24. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]
[WMM Closing Theme]

Next Week on Wednesday, January 17, Brodie Rush and Ben Ruth join us to share music from their latest Be/Non release, FREEDOM PALACE, recorded 12 years ago in the summer of 2006, but never pressed or released due to a record label disagreement. It is now being released through Haymaker Records. In our second hour we’ll talk with Kansas City based artist Ryan Wilkes about Here Where You Wish, an immersive public installation coming to the Kansas City Public Library, Central Library location at 14 W. 10th St. on April 6, 2018. Ryan Wilks is constructing a large public altar in the Central Library with a transformative temple-like labyrinth entry way that encourages the public to consciously and methodically enter. The elaborate and flowing entrance is meticulously crafted by renowned artist Ari Fish. Tim J Harte is composing ritual based sounds/music to softly play through the installation. The altar itself will be 40 square feet and constructed by Sean Prudden and Ryan Wilks, and will beautifully house the objects that people leave behind. To support this project through Ryan’s KickStarter Campaign you can visit: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1840510472/here-where-you-wish/description

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #716

Wednesday MidDay Medley – “Remembering MLK”

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

“Remembering MLK”

Wednesday MidDay Medley celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born January 15, 1929. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King’s efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. By the time of his death, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War, both from a religious perspective. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I.

Mark plays music of the movement from: Mavis Staples, Pops Staples, The Staple Singers, Krystle Warren, Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project Featuring Glenn North, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Labelle, Common & John Legend, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, The Swan Silvertones, Thelonious Monk Septet, Sweet Honey in The Rock, The Holmes Brothers, The Chambers Brothers, The Isley Brothers, Aaron Neville, Soweto Gospel Choir, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, Pete Seeger, and Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion.

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #716

WMM Playlist from: August 28, 2013

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom
Abigail Henderson, + Main Street Day + Ernest James Zydeco +
Guest Producer – Simone Briand

The Kansas City Music Community is heavy hearted. On Tuesday, August 27, our friend Abigail Henderson, died, peacefully at her home, surrounded by her family & friends. Abigail was a frequent guest on this radio show and performed in “A Story In A Song” our benefit last summer at the recordBar. We’ve featured Abigail’s songs from her bands: The Gaslights, Atlantic Fadeout and Tiny Horse. After her diagnosis in 2008, Apocalypse Meow, was created as a benefit for Abby. The event became an annual fundraiser to benefit the Musicians Emergency Health Care Fund. With her husband, Christopher Meck, Abby co-founded the Midwest Music Foundation which gave birth to: The Midcoast Takeover, The Deli KC, The Midwestern Audio compilation, and more. To learn about MMF you can visit: MidwestMusicFound.org. Donations benefit the Musicians Emergency Health Care Fund.

1. Tiny Horse – “Ride”
from: Darkly Sparkly [EP] / Independent / Mar. 4, 2013
[Outside of the band, we were the first to hear the very new, debut EP release from Abigail Henderson and Christopher Lynn Meck. In our opinion, Abigail Henderson’s voice remains one of the most honest and moving voices in KC music scene, Christopher Meck’s guitar sings too. Matt Richey plays drums and Cody Wyoming on keyboards.]

50 years ago today, on Wed, Aug 28, 1963. The March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom became one of the largest political rallies for human rights in U.S. history and called for civil & economic rights for African Americans. Martin Luther King, Jr., standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech.

In celebration of this historic event that changed the world, we will feature musical artists that performed on that day, and we’ll feature the songs they performed. We’ll hear from Marian Anderson, Mahalia Jackson, Joan Baez and Bob Dylan. We will also include music inspired by the Labor and Civil Rights Movement from: The Staple Singers, Pete Seeger, Sweet Honey in The Rock, and International Noise Conspiracy.
10:07

2. Martin Luther King Jr. – “MLK – I Have A Dream 1963 (50 second excerpt)”
from: Inspirational Speeches, Vo. 3 / Orange Leisure / May 16, 2011
[American civil rights leader/activist and Baptist minister, born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King’s speeches have been issued on numerous releases – his most well-known and influential address being “I Have a Dream”, which was held during “The March on Washington” in 1963. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.]

3. Mahalia Jackson – “How I Got Over”
from: The Original Apollo Sessions / Couch & Madison Partners / May 25, 2013
[a Gospel hymn composed and published in 1951 by Clara Ward (1924-1973). It was performed by Mahalia Jackson at the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 before 250,000 people. Mahalia Jackson (Oct. 26, 1911 – Jan. 27, 1972) was an American gospel singer referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”. Jackson became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world and was heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist. She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”. She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers. “I sing God’s music because it makes me feel free,” Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, “It gives me hope. With the blues, when you finish, you still have the blues.”]

4. Bob Dylan – “When The Ship Comes In”
from: The Times They Are-A-Changing / Columbia Records / January 13, 1964
[Released on his 3rd album, Joan Baez states in the documentary film “No Direction Home” that the song was, inspired by a hotel clerk who refused to allow Dylan a room due to his “unwashed” appearance. His companion, Joan Baez, had to vouch for his good character.” Shortly after Dylan completed the song in 1963, he and Baez performed it together at the March on Washington on August 28, 1963.]

5. Joan Baez – “Oh Freedom”
from: How Sweet The Sound / Razor & Tie / October 13, 2009
[A post Civil War African American freedom song, notably associated with Odetta, who recorded it as part of the Spiritual Trilogy, on her “Odetta Sings Ballads and Blues”, and Joan Baez, who performed the song at the 1963 March on Washington, and has since performed the song live numerous times throughout the years, both during her concerts and at other events. The song predates these events by at least 3 decades for it was recorded in 1931 by the E. R. Nance Family with Clarence Dooley as “Sweet Freedom.” ]

6. Marian Anderson – “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
from: He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands / BMG / Orig. 1961
[Reissued 1991] [Marian Anderson (Feb 27, 1897 – Apr. 8, 1993) was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century. In 1939, the (DAR) refused to let Anderson sing in Constitution Hall. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson became the first black person, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC on Jan. 7, 1955. Anderson worked as a delegate to the UN Human Rights Committee and “goodwill ambassadress” for the U.S. Dept. of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.]

In honor of the National March on Washington, President Barack Obama will speak to the nation, in front of the Lincoln Memorial, from the very spot Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have A Dream” speech, fifty years ago today.

The Music gave them the strength to believe they could not fail…

7. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

8. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: We’ll Get Over / Stax / 1970 [Released as a single in 1967]
[Their 2nd album on Stax. The song itself was inspired by a passage in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s I Have a Dream Speech, given at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which took place 50 years ago. MLK – “When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence they were signing a promissory note … a promise that all men, yes black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.”]

9. Sweet Honey in The Rock – “I’m Gon’ Stand”
from: Little Leaves / Flying Fish / Jan. 1, 1988
[Founded in Washington in 1973 by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, who wrote this song. She was a Baptist minister’s daughter who had been on the front lines of the civil rights movement. In the 1960s, Reagon performed at schools, prisons and political rallies with the Freedom Singers in support of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Their biggest gig? Performing “We Shall Not Be Moved” at the 1963 March on Washington. Reagon retired from the group in 2004 and was replaced by two singers in a lineup that is forever changing. (There have been more than 30 singers working in Sweet Honey over the years.) ]

10. The International Noise Conspiracy / Martin Luther King Jr. – “The First Conspiracy (Drum Solo) / Let Freedom Ring”
from: Adbusters – Live Without Dead Time / Adbusters / 2003

Transition Music…

10B. Queen – “Bicycle Race”
from: Jazz / Hollywood Records / 1978

10:30– Interview with Leandra Burnett & Idris Raoufi for Main Street Day

Capitol Federal’s Main Street Day, is Sat, Sept. 7, 11:00am to 4:00pm, with the 6th annual Main Street Mile, a run from Linwood Blvd. to St. Paul’s Episcopal Day School., and then the Cyclovia Festival begins at 12:00 Noon with a car-free, care-free environment for walkers, skaters, cyclists, that will feature live music, local food vendors, and yoga lessons. More info at http://www.mainstreetday.com

Joining us to discuss Main Street Day…

Leandra Burnett is Program Manager at MainCor the champion and leading community partner of Kansas City’s Main Street Corridor. Leandra is also a co-founder and co-director of Front/Space, at 217 W. 18th in KCMO.

Idris Raoufi is a co-founding member of the 816 Bicycle Collective a volunteer run organization working to rescue, repair and redistribute bicycles.The collective wants to increase the bike community to promote alternative transportation that is healthy, inexpensive, and with zero emissions.

Main Street will be closed off from 34th to 40th Streets, with through-traffic stops at Armour Blvd. and 39th Street.

The day starts with the 6th annual Main Street Mile, a run from Linwood Blvd. to St. Paul’s Episcopal Day School. People register for the run at http://www.mainstreetday.com

After the race, the Cyclovia Festival begins at 12:00pm with a car-free and care-free environment for walkers, skaters, cyclists, Cyclovia first started in Bogata, Columbia.

To be a volunteer contact: http://www.mainstreetday.com/

10:43 – Underwriting

10:44

11. Ernest James Zydeco – “Pearlie Pearl”
from: 3 Steps From La La / Jam Rat Records / Fall 2012
[Hailing from KC Missouri, the band lineup has been constant since 2008: Ernest James on accordion and vocals, Barry Barnes on washboard, Jaisson Taylor on drums, Mike Stover on bass guitar, and Tony LaCroix on guitar. This album also includes 4 songs featuring KC’s own Betse Ellis (of The Wilders). Recorded and mixed in KC at Markosa Studios, with Mark Thies. The album was mastered by Collin Jordan at The Boiler Room in Chicago. Ernest James and Jaisson Taylor co-wrote and co-produced the songs.]

11:48 – Interview with Ernest James Zydeco & Will Leathem

Ernest James Zydeco joined us last November to tak about their release “3 Steps From La La.” Ernest James Zydeco will be in concert, Friday, August 30, at 7:00pm, at Prospero’s Uptown Books, 3600 Broadway, KCMO for a KC Bayou End-O-Summer Fais do do!

Betse Ellis joined the band for 4 songs on the new CD.

The Band:
Ernest James on Accordion, Guitar and Vocals;
Jaisson Taylor on Drums and Vocals;
Barry Barnes on Washboard and Percussion;
Mike Stover on Bass; and
Tony LaCroix on Guitar and Vocals.

Ernest James and Jaisson Taylor co-wrote 10 of the 11 songs on the new CD

Ernest James Zydeco will be in concert, Friday, August 30, at 7:00pm, at Prospero’s Uptown Books, 3600 Broadway, KCMO for a KC Bayou End-O-Summer Fais do do!

“3 Steps From La La” was recorded at Markosa Studios in KC with Mark Thies.
The band laid down the basic tracks by playing LIVE in the studio.
Mastered by Collin Jordan at The Boiler Roon in Chicago.

Ernest James Zydeco will be in concert, Friday, August 30, at 7:00pm, at Prospero’s Uptown Books, 3600 Broadway, KCMO for a KC Bayou End-O-Summer Fais do do! More info at: ejzydeco.com

11:57

12. Ernest James Zydeco – “Snap Peas” Live Performance

11:00 – Guest DJ Simone Briand

Simone Briand has lived in New York and Miami, but grew up on the high plains of western Kansas, where she learned to love the sky, sonic booms, and Engelbert Humperdink. Her older siblings’ hippie albums set her on the path to loving music of all types. A self-described zenhobo, she currently resides in OPKS and works as a librarian.

13. Sly and the Family Stone – “Stand” [single version in Mono]
from Stand / Epic Records / May 3, 1969
[4th studio album written and produced by lead singer and multi-instrumentalist Sly Stone, Stand! was the band’s breakout album. It went on to sell over three million copies and become one of the most successful albums of the 1960s.]

14. Sly and the Family Stone – “Remember Who You Are”
from Back on The Right Track / Warner Bros Records / Nov 3, 1979
[9th album, an overt comeback attempt for Sly Stone. However, the album and its singles, “Remember Who You Are” and “The Same Thing (Makes You Laugh, Makes You Cry)”, failed to live up to expectations. Some of the original Family Stone members, including Cynthia Robinson, Pat Rizzo, Freddie Stone, and Rose Stone, make contributions to this album. Back on the Right Track is the first Sly Stone album not to be produced by the artist; Mark Davis was in charge of the project.]

15. Morrissey – “I’m Okay by Myself”
from: Years of Refusal / Lost Highway / Feb 17, 2009

11:15

16. The Walkmen – “Blizzard of “96”
from: Everyone Who Pretended to Like Me is Gone / Vagrant Startime / March 26, 2002

17. Thee Oh Sees -“Humans be Swayed”
from: Moonsick EP / Castle Face / June 11, 2013

18. Regina Spektor – “Ode to Divorce”
from: Soviet Kitsch / Sire / Sept, 21, 2004

11:29 – Underwriting

Soft Reeds vinyl release listening party for “Blank City” at Mills Record Company. Thursday at 6:30pm at Mills Record Company in Kansas City, Missouri.

11:30 – Ticket give away!!!

The bands: Akkilles, Roo & The Howl, and La Guerre will be in concert at the recordBar, 1020 Westport Road, tomorrow, Thursday, AUGUST 29, 10:00 PM – 1:00 AM, Doors open at 9:00pm. We gave away two pairs of tickets to the first and second caller, at 816-931-5534.

19. Animal Collective – “The Purple Bottle”
from: Feels / FatCat Records / August 31, 2004

20. Thee Oh Sees – “I Won’t Hurt You”
from: Castlemania / In the Red Records / May 10, 2011

21. Panda Bear – “Ponytail”
from: Person Pitch / Paw Tracks / June 19, 2007

11:45

22. Thee Oh Sees – “Lupine Dominus”
from: Putrifiers II / In the Red Records / September 18, 2012

23. Orchestral Maneuvers in the Dark – “Dazzleships (Parts ll, lll & Vll) from: Dazzleships / Telegraph (Virgin) / March 4, 1983 [Remastered 2008]

24. Orchestral Maneuvers in the Dark – “Romance of the Telescope”
from: Dazzleships / Telegraph (Virgin) / March 4, 1983 [Remastered 2008]

11:59:30

25. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

Sources for notes on tracks: artist’s websites and wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM
http://www.kkfi.org

Show #488

WMM Playlist from Jan. 30, 2013

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Local & New Releases +
Jennie Greenberry & Bob Linebarger of Spinning Tree Theatre +
Deanna Hurst & Wildwood Highway

1. Foxygen – “No Destruction”
from: We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic / Jagjaguar / January 18, 2013
[Second full-length album by Californian experimental rock duo of Sam France, 22 year old vocalist and songwriter, originally from Olympia, Washington, and Jonathan Rado, also 22, who is a songwriter, guitarist, and keyboard player, originally form NYC. Formed in 2005, the band self-released several EPs between 2007 and 2011. In 2012 the group was signed to Jagjaguwar Records. This album was produced by Richard Swift and recorded at his National Freedom studio.]

2. My Brothers & Sisters – “Fall Winter Spring Summer”
from: Single Track Release / Independent / 2013
[Jamie Searle won critical acclaim as lead vocalist and songwriter for the band It’s Over who won a Pitch Music Award for Best Live Act. He left It’s Over to concentrate on his music education as a student of UMKC’s Conservatory of Music where he immersed himself in mucical theory, compostion, harmonic structure, melody. Now out of school, Jamie is in the process of recording a full length release of material he has composed for a large ensemble of musicians. The result is: My Brothers and Sisters, a collective of at times up to 18 musicians, including a strings, horns, percussionists, bass, keyboards, vocalists, and back-up vocalists, and Jamie on vocals and guitar and conducting.]

10:15

3. Sweet Honey In The Rock – “Confrontation”
from: Go In Grace / She Rocks 5 / Sept. 21, 2010

[Sweet Honey In The Rock play the Muriel Kauffman Theatre at Kauffman Center For the Performing Arts, TONIGHT, Jan. 30, at 7:30 PM!!!]

[All-woman, African-American a cappella ensemble. A Grammy Award-winning (and many times nominated) troupe who express their history as women of color. They have together worked from four women, to the difficult five-part harmony, with a sixth member translating with sign language. Founded in 1973 by Bernice Johnson Reagon, who was teaching a vocal workshop with the Washington, D.C. Black Repertory Company. Dr. Reagon retired from the group in 2004. Their name was derived from a song, based on Psalm 81:16, which tells of a land so rich that when rocks were cracked open, honey flowed from them. Sweet Honey in the Rock has been producing music for more than 30 years. Although the members of the group have changed over 3 decades, their music has consistently combined contemporary rhythms and narratives with a musical style rooted in the Gospel music, spirituals and hymns of the African-American Church. They’ve addressed topics including motherhood, spirituality, freedom, civil rights, domestic violence, immigration issues, and racism.]

[In 2008 Sweet Honey In The Rock joined forces with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater for an historic collaboration, “Go In Grace.” Choreographed by Ailey dancer Hope Boykin, the work featured new music by Sweet Honey, who performed on stage with members of the Ailey troupe. Through song and dance he audience was taken on a journey into the challenges and joys of one special family. “Go with Grace” was part of the 35th anniversary celebration for Sweet Honey In The Rock, and the 50th anniversary celebration for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Sweet Honey In The Rock performed with Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre at The Midland Theatre in Kansas City.]

4. Sweet Honey In The Rock – “Give Love”
from: Go In Grace / She Rocks 5 / Sept. 21, 2010

Two bands who will be part of Midwest Music Foundation’s MidCoast Takeover at the 2013 SXSW Music Festival in March.

5. Olassa – “Where Will I Live”
from: I Love You Come Back To Me / Independent / Jan. 26, 2013
[Indie Folk from Lawrence, Kansas. Allison Olassa Guitar, Accordion, Organ and Vocals; Cain Robberson on guitar and vocals; and Tyler Bachert on drums.]

6. The Empty Spaces – “Party Line”
from: Party Line / Golden Sound Records / July 24, 2012
[KC based band formed as studio band for Mat Shoare’s 2010 solo release The Empty Spaces. Mat Shoare is a founding partner in Golden Sound Records along w/ Jerad Tomasina, and Ross Brown. On Dec 11, Mat released his solo recording: “Domestic Partnership.” Mat played LIVE on WMM last week on Jan. 23, 2013.]

[The Empty Spaces play the recordBar, tomorrow night, January 31, with La Guerre]

[The Empty Spaces play the Riot Room February 10, with Broncho]

7. Shay Estes & Trio All – “God Only Knows”
from: Despite Your Destination / Independent / 2009
[Shay Estes and Zack Albetta on drums, Mark Lowrey on piano, and Ben Leifer on Bass. Lowrey told INK that they, “We’re trying to cross over into the realm of modern jazz by writing arrangements of songs that aren’t staples in jazz repertoire.” The album title comes from the lyrics of “Under the Milky Way,” originally by new wave band The Church. That track was the first arrangement Estes and Lowrey worked on together five years ago, and features guest vocals from Jeff Harshbarger.]

10:29 – Underwriting

10:30 – Interview with Jennie Greenberry and Bob Linebarger of Spinning Tree Theatre

Spinning Tree Theatre is presenting the Kansas City Premiere of “Shipwrecked! An Entertainment – The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As told by Himself)” by Donald Margulies, starring: Charles Fugate, Jennie Greenberry and Bob Linebarger. The show runs, this Friday, February 1st, through Sunday, February 17th, at Paul Mesner Puppet Studio, 1006 E. Linwood Blvd., Kansas City, MO. Jennie Greenberry and Bob Linebarger join us in our 90.1 FM Studios to share more information about the show.

Jennie Greenberry received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree from Stephens College in 2008, she is a member of Actors Equity Association, the union of professional actors and stage managers. Jennie has appeared on stage at the Kansas City Rep, The Coterie, New Theatre Restaurant, American Heartland Theatre, and in New York City at the New Victory Theatre, playing roles in Hairspray, Pippin, The Wiz, Little Shop of Horrors, Lucky Duck, A Christmas Carol, A Chorus Line and many others.

Bob Linebarger graduated from Baker University May 2010. He has worked at Theater for Young America, The Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, Chatterbox Audio Theatre and The Living Room Theatre, playing roles in Carousel, At The End of Apathy, and Tommy. You can also see him in a web series that he and his friend Matt McAndrews put together called “Between Bob and Matt.” Inspired by their deep love of comedian Zach Galifinakis and his “Between Two Ferns” web series, they interview actors and review shows from the Kansas City area in the worst way.

Jennie Greenberry and Bob Linebarger talked about the strong theatre community in KC.

Bob talked about “Between Bob and Matt” where he and Matt McAndrews interview actors and review shows from the Kansas City. You’ve garnered quite a following.

Both Jennie and Bob have strong musical theatre abilities. Mark talked with them about how it seems that Kansas City’s professional theatres are producing more musicals these days.

Jennie and Bob explained: “Shipwrecked! An Entertainment – The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As told by Himself)” by Donald Margulies.

Spinning Tree Theatre presents the KC Premiere of “Shipwrecked! An Entertainment – The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As told by Himself)” by Donald Margulies, starring: Charles Fugate, Jennie Greenberry and Bob Linebarger. The show runs, Friday, February 1st, through Sunday, February 17th, at Paul Mesner Puppet Studio, 1006 E. Linwood Blvd., Kansas City, MO. For more information you can visit: spinningtreetheatre.com or call Spinning Tree Theatre at 816-569-5277.

10:45

The MidCoast Takeover Fundraiser shows benefit the Midwest Music Foundation’s SXSW MidCoast Takeover, the annual showcase, this year featuring 46 bands from the KC area, over 4 days, March 13 – 16, at the Shangri-La, on East 6th Street, in Austin, Texas. For more information you can visit: midcoasttakeover.com or midwestmusicfound.org.

The fundraisers continue…

This Friday, February 1 at Czar with: Jorge Arana Trio – 9:45 / Eyelit – 10:30 / Tiny Horse – 11:15 / The Latenight Callers – 12:00

This Saturday, February 2 at The Riot Room with: Various Blonde – 9:45 / Drop A Grand – 10:30 / Maps for Travelers – 11:15 / Six Percent – 12:15

8. Eyelit – “High”
from: The Woe Dies / Independent / June 22, 2012
[Their song “Motionless” is on Midwestern Audio Vol. 1. Formed in Saint Joseph, MO, in 2008 by Austin (songwriter) and Dansare (voice). They released their first EP “Elephant” in early 2010. “The Woe Dies” was inspired by Bob Dylan, Iron & Wine, and Bright Eyes.]

[Eyelit play Czar, Friday, Feb. 1, with Jorge Arana Trio, Tiny Horse, & The Latenight Callers.]

9. Jorge Arana Trio – “Nightly Stroll”
from: Mapache / Independent / October 26, 2012
[Debut album by the Jorge Arana Trio. Recorded at Soundtrek Studios with Justin Wilson, May 7th, 2012.
Jorge Arana – Guitar / Keys , Josh Enyart – Drums , Jason Nash – Bass]

[Jorge Arana Trio play Czar, Fri. Feb. 1 with Eyelit, Tiny Horse, & The Latenight Callers.]
10:52

10. Six Percent – “Dying World”
from: The Years [EP] / Independent / October 26, 2012
[KC based punk rock band re-forming in 2010. Six Percent has shared the stage with Smashing Pumpkins, 311, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Slipknot and Norma Jean. The band features: Joel Friday on vocals, Jason Matthews on guitar & vocal, Jeremy Angotti on drums, Mike Mudry on guitar, Dustin Clements on trombone & vox, and Kenny Saunders on bass. The band is currently working on a new recording.]

[Six Percent play Riot Room, Sat, Feb. 2, with Drop a Grand, Maps for Travelers, and Various Blonde.]

10. Maps For Travelers – “Static”
from: Single Track Release / Independent / February 27, 2011
[Formed in the Spring of 2010 by 4 musicians who have played and toured nationally in various bands in and around the local KC area. RL Brooks on Vocals, Guitar, Trumpet; Zach Brotherton on Vocals, Guitar; Derek White on Bass, Kevin Medina on Drums. Maps For Travelers are currently putting the finishing touches on their new recording “Broken Antlers.” Their video for “Static” has been featured on FUSE TV – In Demand.]

[Maps for Travelers play Riot Room, Sat, Feb. 2, w/ Drop a Grand, Six Percent, and Various Blonde.]

11:00 – Station ID

12. Various Blonde – “Giant Steps”
from: The Dirty News / Independent / Decvember 11, 2012
[Conceived in 2008 by mutual friends, and now the brainchild of KC native Joshua Allen. The band includes Joshua Allen on Guitar & Vocals, Luis Arana on Bass, and Nick Organ on Drums. Various Blonde’s music has been described as “sonic devastation,” their sound includes a mix of: pop, rock, metal, soul, punk and jazz.]

[Various Blonde play Riot Room, Sat, Feb. 2, w/ Drop a Grand, Maps for Travelers, and Six Percent.]

13. Dollar Fox – “No Accord”
from: Little Mother’s Things I Am Keeping / Money Wolf Music / Oct. 27, 2012
[Recorded by Patrick Meager at Fuzz Bomb. Produced by Meger and Dollar Fox. Mastered by Duane Trower at Weights & Measures Soundlab. 7th release from Money Wolf Music. Dollar Fox: Tommy Donoho, Justin Penney, Nick Dothage, Ethan Taylor, Ryan Watkins. Members of Dollar Fox joined us LIVE on WMM April 18 for our Band Auction, and Oct. 24 before the release of their new recording.]

[Dollar Fox were named the winners The Deli KC Readers’ Best Kansas City Artist of 2012! ]

11:10 – Underwriting

14. Wildwood Highway – “Leap Of Faith”
from: Wildwood Highway / Independent / 2012 [Friends Periel, Deanna Hurst, Bradford Lee Stanfield formed Wildwood Highway in 2011 after years of backing each other on solo projects. They combined their individual styles, alternating between lead vocals & harmonies. They recorded in Nashville, and in LA where they mixed the recordings, legendary Bill Payne of Little Feat graced their album with his B3 and piano work.]

11:15 – Interview with Deanna Hurst

Kansas City native Deanna Hurst, performed in The Rocky Horrow Show at The Unicorn and Forbidden Broadway for Theatre League before moving to Los Angeles in 1990 where she who has worked as a professional actor, singer, and voice over artist. In 2011 Deanna formed the band Wildwood Highway with her friends Periel, and Bradford Lee Stanfield. In 2012 they recorded their self titled debut EP in Nashville.

Deanna Hurst co-wrote the song “Leap of Faith” with Roz Esposito, Deanna talked about the inspiration for the song.

Even though Kansas City is Deanna’s hometown, she worked professionally in Los Angeles and Dallas in the 1980s, and after returning to Kansas City to be on stage in productions at the American Heartland Theatre, The Unicorn, and Theatre League she traveled with the Forbidden Broadway show to Arizona and then permanently moved to LA in the 1990.

Deanna described Her early years in LA working at Aspen Optical, as “living a Bohemian lifestyle.” She worked for several years with The Circle X Theatre Company, (the LA home of our playwriting friend Jeff Goode.)

Deanna worked at the San Diego Repertory Theatre and the Northcoast Repertory Theatre.

Along with theatre Deanna has worked as a vocalist, singer, and voice-over artist, for commercials on radio and television. Deanna has also done several books on tape, including books by Ann Coulter, Teri Hatcher.

Deanna talked about how she ended up getting the same voice over agent as that of the late great “Voice of God” – Don LaFontaine who passed away in 2008, and was an American voice actor famous for recording more than 5,000 film trailers and hundreds of thousands of television advertisements, network promotions, and video game trailers.

Deanna talked about her work in a car commercial that will be air during this weekend’s big Super Bowl broadcast on CBS Television.

Throughout all of this Deanna also got married and became a step-mom.

Deanna met her good friend Periel in the early 1990s at Genghis Cohen, an asian restaurant and bar and one of LA’s hip musical venues.

Deanna met Bradford Lee Stanfield at The Alley several years later.

The three singers helped each other out as solo artists, and in 2011 they decided to form a band.

The band is unique because there are three lead singers, three separate, songwriters, who take turns singing lead vocals.

Bradford Lee Stanfield produced the new recordings for Wildwood Highway. The songs were recorded in Nashville.

The songs were mixed back in LA, it was there that Bill Payne of the famous band, Little Feat, brought his hammond B3 and Piano skills to your songs.

The band is working on releasing a full length recording this year.

Deanna Hurst formed the band Wildwood Highway with her friends Periel, and Bradford Lee Stanfield. Wildwood Highway released their self titled debut EP, with Bill Payne of Little Feat in 2012. More information about wildwoodhighway.us

11:41

15. Wildwood Highway – “I Don’t Need A Man”
from: Wildwood Highway / Independent / 2012
[Longtime close friends Periel, Deanna Hurst and Bradford Lee Stanfield formed Wildwood Highway in 2011 after many years of backing each other up on solo projects. The band combines their individual songs and styles, alternating between lead vocals and tight harmonies. The band recorded songs in Nashville, and in Los Angeles where they mixed the recordings, they had the great fortune of having the legendary Bill Payne of Little Feat grace their album with his B3 and piano work.]

11:45

Vive the Rock is a special Fundraiser for Académie Lafayette, Friday, February 8, at 9:00 PM at the recordBar, 1020 Westport Rd, KCMO, featuring: Federation of Horsepower, The Hillary Watts Riot, The Sexy Accident, The Quivers, and special Emcee: Cody Wyoming. More info at: vivetherock.brownpapertickets.com

16. The Quivers – “I Gots To Have It!”
from: I Gots To Have It! / Independent / August 1, 2012
[Terra Peal- Vocals & Bass, Todd Grantham- Keys & Vocals, Abe Haddad- Guitar & Vocals, Bernie Dugan- Drums. Terra Peal and Bernie Dugan joined us LIVE on Wednesday MidDay Medley on August 15]

[The Quivers play the recordBar on Fri. Feb. 8, w/ Federation of Horsepower, The Hillary Watts Riot, and The Sexy Accident]

17. The Hillary Watts Riot – “Killer Kind”
from: A/S/L / Money Wolf Music / April 20, 2012
[Debut album. THWR include: Hillary Watts Bird, Christian Hankel, Tommy Donoho, Sergio Moreno, Justin Penney. They describe their music as “freak pop.” This band is so fun to see live.]

[The Hillary Watts Riot play the recordBar on Fri. Feb. 8, w/ Federation of Horsepower, The Quivers, and The Sexy Accident]

18. The Smiths – “Still Ill”
From: The Smiths / Sire Records / 1984

11:59:30

19. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

sources for notes: artists websites and wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM
http://www.kkfi.org

Show #458