WMM Playlist from August 19, 2020

Wednesday MidDay Medley
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Nico Gray – Guest Producer

We welcome back to the show, Nico Gray, as “Guest Producer.” Nico is a writer, performance artist, and has worked as an actor with KC Rep, Gorilla Theatre, 8th St. Cafe Theatre, Actor’s Craft, and Big Bang Buffet. Nico has worked for Theatre League, The Midland Theatre and is currently a marketing & advertising consultant with Union Station, KC Fringe, and KC Creates. Nico grew up in KC but has lived in Chicago, New York & Marseille. For WMM Nico Gray has co-hosted several of fund drive shows, Glam Rock show, Bowie Tribute Shows, and our 700th show. Today is his 9th appearance as Guest Producer.

Nico Gray, Thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / 1980
[WMM’s theme song]

2. The Orb – “Slave Till U Die No Matter What U Buy” (L’anse Aux Meadows Mix)
from: Abolition of The Royal Familia / Cooking Vinyl / March 27, 2020
[16th album from The Orb, an electronic music group founded in 1988 by Alex Paterson and The KLF member Jimmy Cauty. Beginning as ambient and dub DJs in London, their early performances were inspired by electronic artists of the 1970s and 1980s, most notably Brian Eno and Kraftwerk. Because of their psychedelic sound, the Orb developed a cult following among clubbers “coming down” from drug-induced highs. The Orb have maintained their drug-related science fiction themes despite personnel changes, including the departure of Cauty and members Kris Weston, Andy Falconer, Simon Phillips, Nick Burton, and Andy Hughes. Paterson has been the only permanent member, continuing to work as the Orb with Swiss-German producer Thomas Fehlmann and, later, with Martin “Youth” Glover, bassist of Killing Joke. Beyond recognition on their albums and concerts, his unauthorized use of other artists’ works has led to disputes with musicians, most notably with Rickie Lee Jones. During their live shows of the 1990s, The Orb performed using digital audio tape machines optimized for live mixing and sampling before switching to laptops and digital media. Despite changes in performance method, The Orb maintained their colorful light shows and psychedelic imagery in concert. These visually intense performances prompted critics to compare the group to Pink Floyd, whose guitarist, David Gilmour, collaborated with them on the album Metallic Spheres in 2010. http://www.theorb.com]

3. Ezra Furman —“I’m Coming Clean”
from: Sex Education Original Soundtrack / Bella Union / January 24, 2020
[Ezra Furman was born September 5, 1986, he is an American musician and songwriter. Furman currently performs solo and tours with her band. Ezra Furman and the Harpoons were a four-piece rock band active between 2006 and 2011. The band consisted of Ezra Furman (vocals, guitar), Job Mukkada (bass guitar), Drew “Adam” Abrutyn (drums), and Andrew Langer (guitar). They formed at Tufts University in 2006. They released four albums: the self-released Beat Beat Beat (2006), followed by Banging Down the Doors (2007), Inside the Human Body (2008) and Mysterious Power (2011). The group broke up in 2011. After their contract with Minty Fresh Records expired, the band released a self-produced compilation album in 2009, Moon Face: Bootlegs and Road Recordings 2006–2009, which included live recordings and some of Furman’s solo work. In 2018, 33⅓ published a book by Furman about Lou Reed’s album Transformer. Furman provided the soundtrack for the 2019 Netflix drama-comedy show Sex Education. The soundtrack consists of songs from Furman’s back catalogue, as well as songs written for the show. Furman and her band also appeared in episode seven of the first season of the show, “At the Bottom of the Ocean,” making a cameo as the band playing at the main characters’ school dance. Furman is Jewish. Her father is from a Jewish family and her mother converted to Judaism. Furman identifies as trans and bisexual, and uses he/him and she/her pronouns. Furman’s younger brother Jonah was lead singer and bassist in the Boston-based rock band Krill, until their split in October 2015. Ezra and Jonah also have two more siblings.]

4. Arthur Lee & Love —“Five String Serenade”
from: Five String Sernade / Last Call & New Rose Records / 1992 [Reissued August 26, 2002]
[Arthur Taylor Lee as born, Arthur Porter Taylor, on March 7, 1945. He died on August 3, 2006, and was an American singer-songwriter who rose to fame as the leader of the Los Angeles rock band Love. Lee was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on March 7, 1945 in John Gaston Hospital, to Agnes (née Porter), a school teacher, and Chester Taylor, a local jazz musician and cornet player. Love’s 1967 album Forever Changes was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and it is part of the National Recording Registry. In late 1996, Lee was sentenced to 12 years for the negligent discharge of a firearm. California’s three strikes law meant Lee was forced to serve a prison term, having previously served two years in jail for arson, and having been charged with various drug, driving and assault offences. Lee denied that he had fired the gun, and visiting fan Doug Thomas who had denied involvement when the police responded later confessed to the deed. Lee was incompetently represented in court; a year-delayed analysis of a gunpowder residue test on him produced a negative result. Had he pleaded guilty, Lee would have been sentenced to nine months in jail but he fought the case and lost. With the charges enhanced on account of his prior felony conviction and coincidental accusations of domestic violence of the same time-frame, the court made an example of him: 12 years, 85 percent of time served: about 9 years. In prison Lee refused visitors and interviews. “I thought I would beat this case, so why would I want to broadcast it? This has been so humiliating to me.” Former bandmates Bryan MacLean and Ken Forssi both died while Lee was incarcerated, ending any speculation as to a full-fledged Love reunion. On December 12, 2001, Lee was released from prison, having served 5½ years of his original sentence. A federal appeals court in California reversed the charge of negligent discharge of a firearm, as it found that the prosecutor at Lee’s trial was guilty of misconduct. In April 2006 it was publicly announced that Lee was being treated for acute myeloid leukemia. A tribute fund was set up shortly after the announcement, with a series of benefit concerts to be performed to help pay medical bills. The most notable of these concerts was produced by Steve Weitzman of SW Productions at New York’s Beacon Theater on June 23, 2006, and featured Robert Plant, Ian Hunter, Ryan Adams, Nils Lofgren, Yo La Tengo, Garland Jeffreys, Johnny Echols (Love’s original lead guitarist), and Flashy Python & The Body Snatchers (featuring Alec Ounsworth of Clap Your Hands Say Yeah). Backed by Ian Hunter’s band, Plant performed 12 songs, including four Led Zeppelin songs and five recorded by Love in the 60s (“7 and 7 Is”, “A House Is Not A Motel”, “Bummer in the Summer”, “Old Man”, and “Hey Joe”).[20] A benefit concert was held in Dublin, Ireland. Lee underwent several months of treatment for leukemia, including chemotherapy and an experimental stem cell transplant using stem cells from an umbilical cord blood donor. His condition continued to worsen, and he died from complications of the disease in Memphis, Tennessee, at the age of 61. Robyn Hitchcock’s 1993 song “The Wreck of the Arthur Lee” from the Robyn Hitchcock and the Egyptians album Respect was written as a tribute to the singer. Arthur Lee is mentioned in the song “Are You Ready to Be Heartbroken”, by Lloyd Cole & the Commotions, as well as in the song “Mate of the Bloke”, by Half Man Half Biscuit. His prison term is the subject of “The Prison’s Going Down” by ex-Stranglers singer and guitarist Hugh Cornwell. Lee is the subject of the song “Byrds Turn to Stone” (originally titled “Mr Lee”) by Liverpool band (and former Arthur Lee backing group) Shack.]

5. Le Ren – “Love Can’t Be the Only Reason To Stay”
from: Morning & Melancholia / Secretly Canadian / July 31, 2020
[Montreal folk singer Le Ren (aka Lauren Spear) recently toured with Orville Peck aad now she signed to Secretly Canadian and released her first single for the label, “Love Can’t Be The Only Reason to Stay.” It’s a gorgeous, tender dose of Americana that sounds like a lost record from 1971.]

6. Oracle Sisters – “Asc. Scorpio”
from: Paris 1 – EP / 22Twenty / July 8, 2020
[Recorded at La Ferme records on a farm in the Arcachon region of France the band settled down to a live work/rhythm and routine for over a week, sleeping in the studio surrounded by chickens and an agriculture farm with a honey bee plantation, the ocean and pine trees. Recording all hours of the day and night when the mood was right they recorded 1 batch of songs with drums and drum machine layered live and 1 batch of songs, all playing live in 1 room….the difference in the sound, feel and aesthetic of the songs made them decide to split these in to two separate EP’s. Overdubs were done back in Paris. The songs represent a collection of the first songs written by Lewis & Chris & Juilia arriving in Paris from Scotland, New York and Helsinki. Music Produced by: Oracle Sisters, except Most of All (produced by Jerome Goldet & Oracle Sisters) / Sound Engineer: Maxime Kosinetz / Mixing: Noah Georgeson ((except for Most of All : Craig Silvey and Max Prior)). Creators of artistic dream rock, Oracle Sisters make music that is at once sonically soothing and lyrically compelling. Intricate vocal harmonies over lilting arrangements make an otherworldly vehicle for dreamlike stories of human connection, home and heartbreak.]

10:31 – Underwriting

7. Noga Erez – “Hit U”
from: Off The Radar / City Slang / June 2, 2017
[Noga Erez was born 26 December 1989) is an Israeli singer, songwriter and producer. In 2017 her song “Dance While You Shoot” was used by Apple in an advertising campaign for its music streaming service. In the same year she released her debut album, Off The Radar to critical acclaim. She grew up in Caesarea from the age of six and studied composition at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. Through her childhood and while growing up she explored different instruments and studied different styles of music. She was a part of different groups and ensembles as a vocalist, keyboardist and percussionist. She served as a military musician during her conscription in the Israeli Defence Forces. In 2011 Erez worked on a jazz album, which she almost finished and decided to scrap and move to writing and producing electronic music. On stage, Erez performs as a three-piece-band with herself on vocals, Ori Rousso (sampler, synthesizer) and Jacobovitz Ran (electronic drums, percussion). In 2017, Erez was included in Forbes Israel’s “Under 30” list. Erez’s first single, “Toy” received a rave review from The New York Times: “the Israeli singer and electronic-music producer Noga Erez gives ‘Toy’ a beat that jitters and heaves, ratchets across the stereo field, speeds up fitfully and stops for a moment of dead silence halfway through the song; the melodies are brief modal phrases hinting at Middle Eastern origins… It’s a sparse, thorny, unstable track — and haunting, too.” Erez produced her first record “Off The Radar”, which was released 2 June 2017 via City Slang, with her partner Ori Rousso. This release was followed by festival shows at Primavera, SXSW, Pitchfork Paris, Roskilde, MELT! Visions Festival, Convergence and Great Escape in 2017. She also toured the UK and Europe in 2017.]

8. Moonlight Benjamin – “Papa Legba”
from: Siltane / Ma Case / March 23, 2018
[The priest of voodoo Rock ‘n Roll pulls no punches with a straight-for-the-jugular, guitar licked homage to Haiti evoking an Afro-energised Black Keys meets Dr. John. This is no world music foray rather a bountiful display of energy in an oft-growling record with plays host to flashes of light and shrouds of darkness, defying musical purity.]

9. Jean-Phillippe Goncalves – “Dance & Angela (Trip-Hop Version)”
from: Sharp Objects (Music from HBO Limited Series) / Entertainment One / Nov. 30, 2018
[Jean-Philippe “Jean-Phi” Goncalves was born in 1978, in Angoulême, France. He is a percussionist and record producer based out of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. An member of Montreal’s electronic music scene, Goncalves provides percussion for the bands Afrodizz, Plaster, Le Golden and Beast. As a producer he has worked with many French-speaking Quebecer musicians and in 2005 he collaborated with American recording artist Lauryn Hill. The musician was particularly busy at the 2005 Festival de Musique Émergente (FME)—an annual new music festival held in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. During the fest he performed on 3 consecutive days for Afrodizz, Plaster and Dan Thouin respectively, causing a reporter to call him “the star of the FME”]

10. John Lewis – “You Can Redeem The Soul of Our Nation”
Mr. Lewis, the civil rights leader and U.S Representative died on July 17. He wrote this essay shortly before his death, to be published upon the day of his funeral in The New York Times. Read by Prentiss Onayemi (5:10 excerpt)

11. Kalu James – “Listen To the Wind”
from: Live / Kalu James / February 24, 2010
[Kalu and the Electric Joint blend the powers of psychedelic soul music with the driving beat of rock and roll and the ancient rhythms of Africa. Born in Nigeria, Kalu relocated to Austin, Texas, where he put together a stellar ensemble of players who graciously fuel and follow his deep well of eclectic influences. The group’s new record, Time Undone is a sonic masterpiece of original tunes with a positive message and soul-stirring beats. The arrangements are masterfully crafted allowing the songs to breathe and flow. From the first note, these musicians show that they’re prepared to carry modern music forward while still paying tribute to the inspirations of their past. Their music invokes a wide range of emotions while influencing with an uplifting message through masterful playing. Opening for acts like George Clinton & The Parliament Funkadelic, Vieux Farka Toure, Allen Stone, Keller Williams amongst many others, this band comes to play and when they do, the dance floor never stays empty.]

12. Nina Simone – “If You Pray Right”
from: Baltimore / CTI – Sony / January 1, 1978
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon; February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003) was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music. Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born the sixth child of a preacher’s family in North Carolina, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. Her musical path changed direction after she was denied a scholarship to the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, despite a well-received audition. Simone was later told by someone working at Curtis that she was rejected because she was black. When she began playing in a small club in Philadelphia to fund her continuing musical education and become a classical pianist she was required to sing as well. She was approached for a recording by Bethlehem Records, and her rendering of “I Loves You, Porgy” was a hit in the United States in 1958. Over the length of her career Simone recorded more than 40 albums, mostly between 1958—when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue—and 1974. Her musical style arose from a fusion of gospel and pop songs with classical music, in particular with influences from her first inspiration, Johann Sebastian Bach, and accompanied with her expressive jazz-like singing in her characteristic contralto. She injected as much of her classical background into her music as possible to give it more depth and quality, as she felt that pop music was inferior to classical. Her intuitive grasp on the audience–performer relationship was gained from a unique background of playing piano accompaniment for church revivals and sermons regularly from the early age of six years old. In the early 1960s, she became involved in the civil rights movement and the direction of her life shifted once again. Simone’s music was highly influential in the fight for equal rights in the United States. In later years, she lived abroad, finally settling in France in 1992. She received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 2000 and was a fifteen-time Grammy Award nominee over the course of her career.]

11:00 – Station ID

13. Prince – “Cosmic Day”
from: Sign ‘O’ the Times (Super Deluxe) / Warner Bros. / September 25, 2020
[The Super Deluxe Edition contains 92 audio tracks, of which 63 are previously unreleased, including 45 studio tracks from Prince’s legendary Vault. The Super Deluxe Edition opens with Prince’s iconic album, Sign O’ The Times, dazzlingly remastered for the very first time by Prince’s original mastering engineer Bernie Grundman. The set also includes an entire previously unreleased audio recording of Prince’s Sign O’ The Times tour performance in Utrecht, Netherlands, on June 20, 1987. The DVD features a complete previously unreleased recording of Prince’s benefit performance at Paisley Park, December 31st, 1987. The show includes Prince’s only on-stage collaboration with Miles Davis. Housed in a 12” box, and accompanied by a 12” 120 page hardback book featuring: Brand new liner notes by: Prince’s creative peers and friends Dave Chappelle (in conversation with photographer Mathieu Bitton) and Lenny Kravitz; Prince’s longtime engineer Susan Rogers; Daphne A. Brooks, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of African American Studies, American Studies and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies at Yale University; Minneapolis radio host and author Andrea Swensson, host of the Official Prince Podcast; and Prince scholar Duane Tudahl. Rare and previously unseen photography by Jeff Katz. Prince’s handwritten lyrics. LP1-2: Sign O’ The Times album (2020 Remaster). LP3-4: 13x single mixes and edits, all newly remastered. LP5-10: 45x previously unreleased studio recordings from Prince’s Vault. LP11-13: 18x live tracks, comprising a complete previously unreleased concert performance recorded in Utrecht, Netherlands, on June 20, 1987. DVD: 23x tracks, comprising a complete previously unreleased concert performance recorded at Paisley Park, Chanhassen, on December 31st, 1987. Vinyl $268.99 // CD $159.98] [Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016) was an American singer-songwriter, musician, record producer, dancer, actor, and filmmaker. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest musicians of his generation. A multi-instrumentalist who was considered a guitar virtuoso, he was well known for his eclectic work across multiple genres, flamboyant and androgynous persona, and wide vocal range which included a far-reaching falsetto and high-pitched screams. Prince’s innovative music integrated a wide variety of styles, including funk, R&B, rock, new wave, soul, synth-pop, psychedelia, pop, industrial, and hip hop. He pioneered the Minneapolis sound, a funk rock subgenre that emerged in the late 1970s. He was also known for his prolific output, releasing 39 albums during his life, with a vast array of unreleased projects left in a vault at his home after his death; it is believed that the vault contains dozens of fully produced albums and over 50 music videos that have never been released, along with various other media. He released hundreds of songs both under his own name and multiple pseudonyms during his life, as well as writing songs that were made famous by other musicians, such as “Nothing Compares 2 U” and “Manic Monday”. Estimates of the complete number of songs written by Prince range anywhere from 500 to well over 1,000. Born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Prince signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. Records at the age of 19. In 1984, he and his backup band, The Revolution, released his sixth album Purple Rain, which was also the soundtrack to his hugely successful film acting debut of the same name. It quickly became his most commercially successful record, spending 24 consecutive weeks atop the Billboard 200. The film also won the Academy Award for Best Original Song Score, the final film to receive the award. After disbanding The Revolution, Prince released the critically acclaimed double album Sign o’ the Times (1987). In the midst of a contractual dispute with Warner Bros. in 1993, he changed his stage name to the unpronounceable symbol Logo. Hollow circle above downward arrow crossed with a curlicued horn-shaped symbol and then a short bar (known to fans as the “Love Symbol”), and was sometimes referred to as “The Artist Formerly Known as Prince” or simply “The Artist”. He signed with Arista Records in 1998 and began referring to himself by his own name again in 2000. On April 2016, at the age of 57, Prince died of an accidental fentanyl overdose at his Paisley Park home and recording studio in Chanhassen, Minnesota. He sold over 130 million records worldwide, ranking him among the best-selling music artists of all time. He was honored with special awards including the Grammy President’s Merit Award, the American Music Awards for Achievement and of Merit, and the Billboard Icon Award. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2006, and the Rhythm and Blues Music Hall of Fame in 2016. Rolling Stone placed Prince among its list of both the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time and 100 Greatest Songwriters of All Time. He is also ranked on the Top 100 Artists of All Time list by Billboard.]

14. Beck – “Nicotine & Gravy”
from: Midnight Vultures / Geffen Records / November 20, 1999
[Beck Hansen (born Bek David Campbell; July 8, 1970) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, and record producer. He rose to fame in the early 1990s with his experimental and lo-fi style, and became known for creating musical collages of wide-ranging genres. He has musically encompassed folk, funk, soul, hip hop, electronic, alternative rock, country, and psychedelia. He has released 14 studio albums (three of which were released on indie labels), as well as several non-album singles and a book of sheet music.Born and raised in Los Angeles, Beck grew towards hip-hop and folk in his teens and began to perform locally at coffeehouses and clubs. He moved to New York City in 1989 and became involved in the city’s small but fiery anti-folk movement. Returning to Los Angeles in the early 1990s, he cut his breakthrough single “Loser”, which became a worldwide hit in 1994, and released his first major album, Mellow Gold, the same year. Odelay, released in 1996, topped critic polls and won several awards. He released the country-influenced, twangy Mutations in 1998, and the funk-infused Midnite Vultures in 1999. The soft-acoustic Sea Change in 2002 showcased a more serious Beck, and 2005’s Guero returned to Odelay’s sample-based production. The Information in 2006 was inspired by electro-funk, hip hop, and psychedelia; 2008’s Modern Guilt was inspired by ’60s pop music; and 2014’s folk-infused Morning Phase won Album of the Year at the 57th Grammy Awards. His 2017 album, Colors, won awards for Best Alternative Album and Best Engineered Album at the 61st Annual Grammy Awards. His fourteenth studio album, Hyperspace, was released on November 22, 2019. With a pop art collage of musical styles, oblique and ironic lyrics, and postmodern arrangements incorporating samples, drum machines, live instrumentation and sound effects, Beck has been hailed by critics and the public throughout his musical career as being among the most idiosyncratically creative musicians of 1990s and 2000s alternative rock. Two of Beck’s most popular and acclaimed recordings are Odelay and Sea Change, both of which were ranked on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The four-time platinum artist has collaborated with several artists and has made several contributions to soundtracks.] [Midnite Vultures is the seventh studio album by American musician Beck, released on November 23, 1999 by DGC Records. While similar to most of Beck’s previous albums in its exploration of widely varying styles, it did not achieve the same blockbuster success as his breakthrough album Odelay, but was still critically acclaimed and commercially successful. Several songs were directly inspired by other songs: “Get Real Paid” features a spiraling sequencer motif reminiscent of Kraftwerk’s “Home Computer”; a synth breakdown in “Milk & Honey” echoes a similar riff in Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five’s “The Message”; “Beautiful Way” came about after listening to The Velvet Underground’s “Countess from Hong Kong”; and “Debra” was inspired by both Prince’s song “Adore” and the David Bowie song “Win”. Midnite Vultures reached number 34 in the US, where it went gold, and also hit number 19 in the UK. As of July 2008, Midnite Vultures has sold 743,000 copies in the United States. Midnite Vultures was praised by most critics, and the album holds a score of 83 at Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, indicating “universal acclaim”.[4] Jon Pareles of Rolling Stone remarked that on Midnite Vultures, Beck “plays the insider, riding the executive plane through the good life with every need fulfilled.” Richard Cromelin of the Los Angeles Times wrote that he gives the album “a cinematic richness, depth and detail with an array of mutations and surprises, from banjo hoedown to electronic effects”.]

15. Christian Ihle Hadland – “Trois nouvelles études: Etude No. 3 in D Flat Major”
from: Paris Avenue Montaigne: Eclectic Selection of Haute Couture Classics from Bel Canto to Downtempo / 340 MS / May 20, 2014
[Christian Ihle Hadland is widely recognized as one of Norway’s most exciting young piano talents and following his recital debut at the Norwegian Opera in 2008 was hailed in the Norwegian press as an artist who shows himself as a unique musician whose artistry should be heard on the world’s concert stages. In 2009 he was appointed joint Artistic Director of the Stavanger Chamber Music Festival alongside Swedish clarinetist Martin Fröst. In 2011 he was selected for the prestigious BBC Radio 3’s New Generation Artists scheme.]

16. The Lemon Twigs – “Those Days Is Comin’ Soon”
from: Do Hollywood / 4AD / October 14, 2016
[The Lemon Twigs are an American rock band from Long Island, New York, fronted by brothers Brian and Michael D’Addario. Both brothers are vocalists, songwriters and multi-instrumentalists, and are joined live by Daryl Johns on bass, Tommaso Taddonio on keyboards and Andres Valbuena on drums. Brian and Michael D’Addario had extensive stage experience as children. Brian played Gavroche in Les Miserables and Flounder in The Little Mermaid on Broadway. Michael appeared in The Coast of Utopia, The Radio City Christmas Spectacular, and the 2008 production of All My Sons. Michael also appeared in a variety of television shows and films, such as John Adams on HBO, Are We There Yet? on TBS, and the 2012 films People Like Us and Sinister.[2] The Lemon Twigs were founded by the brothers while they were both students at Hicksville High School on Long Island, New York. The siblings both perform lead vocals, lead guitar, drums and other instruments. Their first release was the cassette What We Know, issued in a limited edition of 100 copies (with digital download) in 2015 by Winspear. On their debut release, Do Hollywood, each brother took the lead on vocals and guitar on the songs he composed; during live performances, this setup was preserved, with the remaining D’Addario playing the drums, and fellow schoolmates Megan Zeankowski and Danny Ayala (who have played with the D’Addarios on and off since their youth) playing bass and keyboards, respectively. Ayala also sang backing vocals. The album, produced by Jonathan Rado of Foxygen, was recorded in the spring of 2015, with the members being only 15 and 17 at the time of its creation. The Lemon Twigs served as opening act for fellow New York City/Long Island-based alt-rockers Sunflower Bean on their East Coast tour in late 2016 and performed on television programs like The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, CBS This Morning “Saturday Sessions” and Conan along the way. In early 2017 it was announced that the band would play on day one of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, California on April 14, 2017. This performance saw the Twigs joined by one of the band’s “favorite musicians ever, in the whole world”, Todd Rundgren, to play “Couldn’t I Just Tell You” from Rundgren’s classic 1972 double album, Something/Anything?. The Lemon Twigs released the Do Hollywood tracks “These Words” and “As Long As We’re Together” as a double-A-side single, and made videos for both songs. The third single was the album opener, “I Wanna Prove to You”, with a video directed by Nick Roney. The band played at several major festivals in the summer of 2017, such as Glastonbury, Outside Lands, Lollapalooza, Austin City, and the Montreux, in addition to opening for Phoenix across the United States. These 2017 shows saw the band covering songs such as “Fish and Whistle” by John Prine, “I Walked with a Zombie” by Roky Erickson, “You Can’t Talk to the Dude” by Jonathan Richman, “I’ve Begun To Fall In Love” by R. Stevie Moore, “Love Stepped Out” by their father, Ronnie D’Addario, and “I Can Feel the Fire” by Ronnie Wood; they notably performed the latter song with Thomas Hedlund of Phoenix on drums while supporting Phoenix at the Hollywood Bowl alongside Mac DeMarco. In September 2017 the band released an EP, Brothers of Destruction, containing songs recorded during the Do Hollywood sessions.]

17. Armando Trovaioli – “Sessomatto (Feat. Edda dell’Orso)” (Vinyl)
from: Sesso Matto / Duse Records / 1973
[Armando Trovajoli was born September 2, 1917 in Rome and died February 28, 2013, in Rome. He was an Italian film composer and pianist with over 300 credits as composer and/or conductor, many of them jazz scores for exploitation films of the Commedia all’italiana genre. He collaborated with Vittorio De Sica on a number of projects, including one segment of Boccaccio ’70. Trovajoli was also the author of several Italian musicals: among them, Rugantino and Aggiungi un posto a tavola. Trovajoli was the widower of actress Pier Angeli. He died in Rome at the age of 95 on 28 February 2013. After graduating from the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome (1948), Trovajoli was entrusted by RAI with the direction of a pop music orchestra, set with 12 violins, 4 violas, 4 cellos, 1 flute, 1 oboe, 1 clarinet, 1 horn, harp, vibraphone, electric guitar, bass, drums and the piano (played by Trovajoli himself). In 1952–53 he collaborated with Piero Piccioni in Eclipse, a weekly musical broadcast in which the orchestra is directed alternately by the two composers, in a style extremely refined and sophisticated, very different from the music of radio orchestras at that time. Together with Goffredo Petrassi, Trovajoli composed the score of Giuseppe De Santis’ Bitter Rice (1949). In 1951, Trovajoli was invited by Dino De Laurentiis to write music for Anna, a film directed by Alberto Lattuada: particularly the song El Negro Zumbón became an international success: inspired by tropical rhythms, is sung in playback and danced by Silvana Mangano, but actually performed by Flo Sandon’s. Since then, Trovajoli wrote soundtracks for directors as Dino Risi, Vittorio De Sica, Ettore Scola and others.]

18. Alessandro Alessandroni – “Capelli Rossi”
from: Open Air Parade / SR Records / 1972
[Alessandro Alessandroni was born March 18, 1925 and died March 26, 2017. He was an Italian musician and composer. He played multiple instruments, including the guitar, mandolin, mandolincello, sitar, accordion and piano, and composed more than 40 film scores and countless library music. Alessandroni collaborated with his childhood friend Ennio Morricone on a number of soundtracks for Spaghetti westerns. Morricone’s orchestration often calls for an unusual combination of instruments, voices, and whistling. Alessandroni’s twangy guitar riff is central to the main theme for The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Alessandroni can be heard as the whistler on the soundtracks for Sergio Leone’s films, including A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, Once Upon a Time in the West, and Pervirella. Alessandroni founded the octet vocal group I Cantori Moderni in 1961. The group, which included his wife, Giulia De Mutiis [it], performed wordless vocals on several Italian movie soundtracks. Most notably, I Cantori Moderni are featured on the song “Mah Nà Mah Nà”, written by Piero Umiliani for the 1968 Luigi Scattini mondo film Sweden: Heaven and Hell (Italian: Svezia, inferno e paradiso [it]) and popularized on The Muppet Show. Alessandro has also composed film scores, including Any Gun Can Play (1967), Johnny Hamlet (1968), The Reward’s Yours… The Man’s Mine (1969), Lady Frankenstein (1971), The Devil’s Nightmare (1971), The Mad Butcher (1971), Seven Hours of Violence (1973), Poker in Bed (1974), White Fang and the Hunter (1975), Blood and Bullets (1976), L’adolescente (1976), La professoressa di scienze naturali (1976), The Opening of Misty Beethoven (1976), Women’s Camp 119 (1977), Killer Nun (1978), L’imbranato (1979), and Trinity Goes East (1998).]

19. Ennio Morricone – “The Braying Mule”
from: Django Unchained (OST)/ Visiona Romantica / January 1, 2012
[Ennio Morricone, was born November 10, 1928 and died July 6, 2020. He was an Italian composer, orchestrator, conductor, and trumpet player who wrote music in a wide range of styles. Morricone composed more than 400 scores for cinema and television, as well as more than 100 classical works. His score to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) is considered one of the most influential soundtracks in history. It was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. His filmography includes more than 70 award-winning films, all Sergio Leone’s films since A Fistful of Dollars, all Giuseppe Tornatore’s films since Cinema Paradiso, The Battle of Algiers, Dario Argento’s Animal Trilogy, 1900, Exorcist II, Days of Heaven, several major films in French cinema, in particular the comedy trilogy La Cage aux Folles I, II, III and Le Professionnel, as well as The Thing, Once Upon a Time in America, The Mission, The Untouchables, Mission to Mars, Bugsy, Disclosure, In the Line of Fire, Bulworth, Ripley’s Game, and The Hateful Eight. Morricone is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential film composers of all time. After playing the trumpet in jazz bands in the 1940s, he became a studio arranger for RCA Victor and in 1955 started ghost writing for film and theatre. Throughout his career, he composed music for artists such as Paul Anka, Mina, Milva, Zucchero, and Andrea Bocelli. From 1960 to 1975, Morricone gained international fame for composing music for Westerns and—with an estimated 10 million copies sold—Once Upon a Time in the West is one of the best-selling scores worldwide. From 1966 to 1980, he was a main member of Il Gruppo, one of the first experimental composers collectives, and in 1969 he co-founded Forum Music Village, a prestigious recording studio. From the 1970s, Morricone excelled in Hollywood, composing for prolific American directors such as Don Siegel, Mike Nichols, Brian De Palma, Barry Levinson, Oliver Stone, Warren Beatty, John Carpenter, and Quentin Tarantino. In 1977, he composed the official theme for the 1978 FIFA World Cup. He continued to compose music for European productions, such as Marco Polo, La piovra, Nostromo, Fateless, Karol, and En mai, fais ce qu’il te plait. Morricone’s music has been reused in television series, including The Simpsons and The Sopranos, and in many films, including Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained. He also scored seven Westerns for Sergio Corbucci, Duccio Tessari’s Ringo duology and Sergio Sollima’s The Big Gundown and Face to Face. Morricone worked extensively for other film genres with directors such as Bernardo Bertolucci, Mauro Bolognini, Giuliano Montaldo, Roland Joffé, Roman Polanski, Henri Verneuil, Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi, and Pier Paolo Pasolini. His acclaimed soundtrack for The Mission (1986), was certified gold in the United States. The album Yo-Yo Ma Plays Ennio Morricone stayed for 105 weeks on the Billboard Top Classical Albums. Morricone’s best-known compositions include “The Ecstasy of Gold”, “Se Telefonando”, “Man with a Harmonica”, “Here’s to You”, the UK No. 2 single “Chi Mai”, “Gabriel’s Oboe”, and “E Più Ti Penso”. In 1971, he received a “Targa d’Oro” for worldwide sales of 22 million, and by 2016 Morricone had sold more than 70 million records worldwide. In 2007, he received the Academy Honorary Award “for his magnificent and multifaceted contributions to the art of film music”. He was nominated for a further six Oscars, and in 2016, received his only competitive Academy Award for his score to Quentin Tarantino’s film The Hateful Eight, at the time becoming the oldest person ever to win a competitive Oscar. His other achievements include three Grammy Awards, three Golden Globes, six BAFTAs, ten David di Donatello, eleven Nastro d’Argento, two European Film Awards, the Golden Lion Honorary Award, and the Polar Music Prize in 2010. Morricone influenced many artists from film scoring to other styles and genres, including Hans Zimmer, Danger Mouse, Dire Straits, Muse, Metallica, and Radiohead.]

10:27 – Underwriting

Nico Gray

11:29 – Nico Speaks Out!

July 5th would’ve been my brother Benjamin’s 54th birthday. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in May 2001. On the day of his death, a beautiful sunny Tuesday, he walked into a K-Mart, and next to the Martha Stewart bath towels found the ‘outdoors’ department and purchased a case…

…of 12 gauge shotgun shells. Suicide accounts for the highest number of deaths by guns. He died that same afternoon. The bullet he used to kill himself added money into the pockets of the company who makes them – sells them like candy at our department stores.  

A gallon of milk, some t-shirts, toothpaste – the necessities – oh, and guns, and bullets.

Thank God for capitalism and the convenience of our 24 hour superstores. It’s good to be an American. Yes?

No, not today. I am embarrassed by our country, and have been since Nov. 8th 2016 when half of my blood family voted for a racist-white nationalist, bigoted, homophobic sex offender.

No, today I am NOT celebrating our independence. We ARE NOT FREE. We are chained and bound to witness the demise in self character and morals in our country. Greed and selfishness and a false sense of privilege drive these intentions – with a twist of hypocrisy.

Ah, let me squeeze a lemon and stir. Now it’s better. We Americans like our denial –
it’s as wholesome as the rotten apple pies we bake and pass off as patriotism.”

11:33

20. Rich Aucoin – “Reset”
from: United States / Haven Sounds / September 18, 2020
[4th full length studio album from the Canadian indie rock musician, based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is the younger brother of Paul Aucoin of Hylozoists. He performs and records both as a solo artist and as a collaborator and guest musician in Hylozoists.]

21. J.S. Ondara —“I’m Afraid of Americans”
from: Tales of America (The Second Coming) / Verve Forecast-UMG / Sept. 20, 2019
[28 year old J.S. Ondara is a Kenyan singer-songwriter whose debut album, Tales of America, was released on February 15, 2019 via Verve Label Group. J.S. Ondara was born in August 1992 in Nairobi, Kenya. As a child, he wrote poems and stories as well as songs despite not having an instrument to play them on because his family couldn’t afford one. He was inspired by Radiohead, Nirvana, Death Cab For Cutie, Jeff Buckley, Pearl Jam, Guns N’ Roses, and Bob Dylan. He grew up listening to rock songs on his older sisters’ battery-powered radio. Having discovered The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan following a dispute with a friend over whether Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door was a Guns N’ Roses song, Ondara resolved to travel to the United States to pursue a career in music. In February 2013, after winning in the green card lottery, he moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota at the age of 20. He taught himself to play guitar and perform during open mic nights. Eventually, he decided to study music therapy in college, but dropped out of school to return to playing small shows at coffee houses after attending a concert. After moving to Minnesota, Ondara tried his hand at making music and performing in small venues. His big break came when Minneapolis radio station KCMP 89.3 The Current played one of his songs on air by pulling audio from his YouTube channel, where he had been uploading covers of his favorite songs. At the time, he was going by the name Jay Smart. Ondara’s debut album, Tales of America, was released in February 2019 by Verve Label Group. Despite only 11 tracks making the final tracklist, Ondara wrote more than 100 songs for the album, all based on an immigrant’s life in America. The album was produced by Mike Viola of the Candy Butchers. In support of the album, Ondara embarked on his first headlining tour in March 2019. After the release of the album, Ondara debuted on Billboard’s Emerging Artist chart at No. 37 in March 2019. The album also landed on the Billboard Heatseekers Album, Americana/Folk Album Sales, and Rock Album Sales charts. He was nominated for Best Emerging Act at the 2019 Americana Music Honors & Awards. Ondara cites Bob Dylan as his musical hero, which is why he chose to live in Minnesota and why he wears his signature fedora. He has toured with the Milk Carton Kids, Lindsey Buckingham and in 2019, he opened for select dates on tour with Neil Young.]

22. Winds – “Don’t Fall Apart”
from: Don’t Fall Apart – Single / Winds Records / May 21, 2020
[Los Angeles, California based Winds is John Zabawa & Trevor Pritchett, This is one of two singles available other bandcamp page. Produced by Winds & Glenn Brigman. Written by John Zabawa & Trevor Pritchett. Drums & Percussion by Brendan Peleo-Lazar. Winds describe their sound as: “A breeze always blows in the direction it wishes to go.”]

23. The Innocence Mission — “On Your Side”
from: See You Tomorrow / Thérèse Records / January 17, 2020
[12th studio album from The Innocence Mission, an indie folk band with: Karen Peris (née McCullough), her husband (and fellow guitarist) Don Peris, and Mike Bitts (on bass guitar). The band was formed in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, when the members met during a Catholic school production of Godspell. Although all members of the band have contributed to their music, Karen Peris is their main writer. Before being signed to a record label, the band originally played local clubs, events and at Lancaster Catholic High School (the alma mater of the band members).Their self-titled debut album was released in 1989 on A&M Records and was produced by Larry Klein, then-husband of Joni Mitchell. Recorded in Mitchell’s Los Angeles studio, the album spent 10 weeks on the Billboard charts, peaking at #167 in 1990. Klein also produced their 1991 follow up, Umbrella. Their third A&M album, Glow (1995), was produced by Dennis Herring, who had previously produced two records for Camper Van Beethoven. This album is a departure from Klein’s heavier production style. Herring’s lighter touch gave more emphasis to the group’s guitar work and to Karen’s vocals and lyrics. Glow contains songs that appear on the soundtracks of the films Empire Records and Dream for an Insomniac, as well as the television series Party of Five. The album’s second track, “Bright as Yellow,” peaked at #33 on Billboard’s Modern Rock Tracks. After the band completed the recording of a follow-up album to Glow, A&M Records was bought by Universal Music Group. The group decided to mutually part ways with the label, shortly before it was merged with other companies to form Interscope-Geffen – A&M. 1999’s Birds of My Neighborhood inaugurated The Innocence Mission as they are today, following three albums as a quartet that drew comparisons to The Sundays and 10,000 Maniacs. When drummer Steve Brown left to become a chef, Karen Peris (guitars, piano, pump organ, accordion, voice), Don Peris (guitars, drums, voice) and Mike Bitts (upright bass) forged ahead with an orchestral and sometimes cinematic folk-pop sound, which they felt was truer to their real nature – in any case, a sound rich in atmosphere, innately sad, but ultimately hopeful. The album was followed by the release of The Lakes of Canada EP, which contains a remix of “Snow” by Icelandic electronic group GusGus, the band’s only remix thus far. The 2000 release, Christ Is My Hope, featuring folk songs and hymns that had inspired them over the years, was independently distributed by their own label, LAMP, with all proceeds from sales of the record being donated to hunger relief charities. An exclusive one-album deal signed with independent label WhatAreRecords? saw Small Planes following a year later. Their first album on Badman Records in the US and Agenda in Europe, Befriended, was released in 2003 and was followed a year later by a collection of lullabies, standards, traditional and classical songs called Now the Day Is Over. Recorded over two weeks in Aug. 2004, the album contained their well-known cover of Henry Mancini’s “Moon River.” Badman Records acquired license to re-master and re-issue the then-out-of-print Birds of My Neighborhood album in 2006. We Walked in Song was released in 2007 and included the song “Brotherhood of Man”, which appeared in two acclaimed films: the documentary The Human Experience and the short film Weathered, starring Tony Hale and Nicole Parker, which also featured a new version of the song “Our Harry”. Also on this album are “Happy Birthday” and closing song “Over the Moon”, both of which are featured in the Julia Roberts film Fireflies in the Garden. On June 6, 2008, “Bright as Yellow” was played as the official NASA wake-up call for the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-124 on flight day 7. Street Map was released in December 2008 and was the second record to be distributed independently on their own LAMP label, while their eighth studio album, My Room in the Trees, was released on July 13, 2010. Their ninth studio album, Hello I Feel the Same, was released on October 17, 2015, followed by Sun on the Square in 2018. Their next studio album, See You Tomorrow, is due for release on January 17, 2020. Don Peris has recorded four solo albums: Ten Silver Slide Trombones (2001), the mostly instrumental Go When the Morning Shineth (2006), which features a vocal contribution from Karen Peris on “North Atlantic Sand”, and an instrumental solo guitar album, Brighter Visions Beam Afar (2007), which raised money for local food banks. His fourth studio album, The Old Century, was released on May 7, 2013. Karen Peris released her first solo album, Violet, on Dec. 3, 2012. The 10-song album was performed mainly on piano, and features six instrumental compositions. Don Peris appears as guitarist on two songs, while the couple’s two children performed violin and viola on a further two songs. A version of the album containing two bonus tracks, “First Days in the City” and “Getting Here”, was released in Japan through P-Vine Records on May 15, 2013. Sufjan Stevens calls The Innocence Mission “moving and profound”, adding, “What makes Karen Peris’ lyrics so remarkable is the economy of words, sensory language, concrete nouns – everyday objects take on tremendous meaning.]

24. The New Seekers — “Look What They’ve Done to My Song, Ma”
from: The Best of the New Seekers / Elektra Records / April 26, 2005
[Originally released on the album, Keith Potger and the New Seekers, November 1970 on Phillips Records. The band’s second album and second single. The New Seekers are an English pop group, formed in London in 1969 by Keith Potger after the break-up of his group, The Seekers. The idea was that the New Seekers would appeal to the same market as the original Seekers, but their music would have pop as well as folk influences. They achieved worldwide success in the early 1970s with hits including “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing”, “You Won’t Find Another Fool Like Me” and “Beg, Steal or Borrow.” “What Have They Done to My Song Ma,” is a song by Melanie. It was released in 1970 as the B-side of her “Ruby Tuesday” single and included on the album Candles in the Rain. The single reached the number 39 in the UK. Other artists have recorded the song as “Look What They’ve Done To My Song Ma”, after the song’s first line, and this title is used on the Music page at Melanie’s own website. Daliah Lavi recorded a successful German version of the song in 1971 and Ray Charles released a cover (as “Look What They’ve Done to My Song, Ma”) in 1972. The song has also been covered by many other artists, including Nina Simone, the New Seekers, and Billie Jo Spears. Dalida recorded the song in French and Italian [4] and released both version as singles. Czechoslovak singer Helena Vondráčková recorded it in 1971 as “Kam zmizel ten starý song” with Czech lyrics by Zdeněk Borovec. Jeanette did an English/French version in 1973. Yugoslav rock band Bajaga i Instruktori released a cover of it with lyrics in Serbian, called “Vidi šta sam ti uradio od pesme, mama”, in 1985. It was used in the 1970s as a commercial for Lifebuoy soap (“Look what they’ve done to my Lifebuoy”), and in the 1980s as a commercial jingle for Ramada Inn (as “Look what they’ve done to Ramada”) and for Oatmeal Crisp cereal (as “Look what they’ve done to my oatmeal”). In October 2012, Miley Cyrus released a video of her own acoustic version of the song as part of her Backyard Sessions series. In 2015, Melanie joined her to duet on the song in addition to “Peace Will Come (According to Plan)”. Another copy version was made by Jack Wild which appeared on his album «Everything’s coming up Roses», released in 1971.]

25. Alfred Hall —“Safe & Sound”
from: Wilderness / Sony / 2013
[Norwegian indie pop duo, formed in the summer of 2009 by Bjørn Tveit on vocals & guitar, and Hans Thomas Kiær on guitar, the Norwegian town Drammen. Their debut single, “So Bright” was nominated for “Ukas Urørt” in 2011, and was released the year after following a period of repackaging in the Tinnitus studio in Bergen. Their first album, “Wilderness”, came out exclusively in Norway in 2013, and was nominated for the Spellemann Award (the Norwegian “Grammy”) in the category “Pop Group of the Year”. On October 9th, Alfred Hall, as one of three artist, performed at the opening night of the first JaJaJa club night in Fluxbau, Berlin. They released their first international EP in the fall of 2014, called “Alfred Hall EP”. Their first international single, “The King of Cape” was released in the beginning of 2015. In April 2015, Alfred Hall was chosen as one of 14 finalists to play at the Midem festival in Cannes in June 2015.]

26. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

11:58 – ArtsKCGo – Arts Calendar

Nico Gray Thank you for being our Guest Producer today!

Happy Birthday to Caleb Belknap!

Next week on Wednesday, August 26 we talk with Folk Singer Eliza Gilkyson. We also talk with The Black Creatures who play shows on Friday and Saturday next weekend August 28 and 29 at Lemonaid(e) Park, and we welcome hip hop MC extraordinaire, Kemet Coleman who has a new EP and plays Greenline Grows KC – Benefit for The Greenline Initiative, Friday, August 28, 7:00 PM, streams LIVE on Facebook & YouTube with: Radkey, The Greeting Committee, Khrystal., Danny Cox & Bob Walkenhorst, Cuee, Enrique Javier Chi of Making Movies w/ Las Hermanas Altoro, Stephonne, Krystle Warren, They Call Me Sauce, The Phantastics and more! joins us to share new music.

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Nico Gray Portrait by: Jan McNiel

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Black Lives Matter

Show #851

WMM presents Guest Producer – Nico Gray

Wednesday MidDay Medley
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Nico Gray – Guest Producer

Nico Gray

Mark welcomes back to WMM Nico Gray, for his 9th time as “Guest Producer.” Nico is a writer, performance artist, and actor who has performed with KC Rep, Gorilla Theatre, 8th St. Cafe Theatre, Actor’s Craft, and Big Bang Buffet. Nico has worked for Theatre League, The Midland Theatre, and is currently a marketing & advertising consultant with Union Station, KC Fringe, and KC Creates. Nico grew up in KC but has lived in Chicago, New York, and Marseille.

Nico will feature tracks from: The Orb, Ezra Furman, Arthur Lee & Love, Le Ren, Oracle Sisters, Noga Erez, Moonlight Benjamin, Jean-Phillippe Goncalves, Kalu James, Nina Simone, Prince, Beck, The Lemon Twigs, Armando Trovaioli, Alessandroni, Ennio Morricone, Rich Aucoin. J.S. Ondara, Winds, The Innocence Mission, and Alfred Hall.

Nico Gray Portrait by: Jan McNiel

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #851

WMM Playlist From July 8, 2020

Stephonne Singleton photo by Paul Andrews Photograph. Calvin Arsenia photo by Jenny Wheat Photography. Krystle Warren photo by Manu Noyon. Nina Simone photo by Jack Robinson – Getty Images

Wednesday MidDay Medley
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Sam Platt talks about Ondist + Nina Songs
+ New & MidCoastal Releases

1. “It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Orig. Motion Picture Soundtrack All That Jazz / Casablanca / Dec 20, 1979
[WMM’s theme]

Calvin Arsenia

2. Calvin Arsenia – “Experience”
from: Catastrophe / Calvin Arsenia / February 14, 2017
[Calvin Arsenia premiered these songs in a live show at recordBar in November 2016 in a stage show that involved a company of 50 people, dancers, stilt walkers, special lighting, back up singers, guest artists. Born in Orlando, Florida, Calvin’s creative journey really began when he moved to the KC suburb of Olathe, teaching himself the guitar, and eventually the harp. He learned his signature instrument at the age of 20 after he couldn’t find a harpist as determined as him to meld folk, rock, classical, rap and R&B into the irresistible fusion which has become his calling card in the Kansas City music scene and beyond. His passion for stretching the boundaries of musical expression saw him transform a trip to Edinburgh, Scotland’s Fringe Festival early in his career into a life-changing music mission, with an Edinburgh church offering him a role as musical liaison between the church and the city that would change his life. Two years and 300 shows later, Calvin returned to Kansas City reborn as a humanistic songwriter/performer whose impassioned and conceptual stage shows (regularly sold-out in Kansas City, currently catching fire on the West Coast with a diverse following across Europe), are collaborative, costumed-culture-bridging spectacles which In KC Magazine has hailed as ‘equal parts opera, symphony, musical theatre, rock show, all built around its creator: a charismatic 6-foot-6-inch harpist with a natural stage command and knack for gilding gold and painting lilies.’ Since Calvin Arsenia came home to KC after living in Edinburgh, Scotland, he has released thr EP, Moments, in 2014, the EP Prose in 2015, the Folk Alliance exclusive EP Catastrophe in 2016, the full length album Catastrophe on February 14, 2017, the EP Caviar in Novenber 2017, the 2018 national debut, Cantaloupe, released September 15, 2018 on Center Cut Records. On June 28, 2019 Calvin released Honeydew, an EP including a remix of three songs from Cantaloupe. On September 20, 2019 Calvin released LA Sessions. On December 13, 2019 Calvin released his full length Christmas album “all is calm.” Calvin is also a graduate of Artist INC. Since 2014 we have been celebrating the music of Calvin Arsenia. He has played Folk Alliance International, Kansas City Fringe Fest, The Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, The Kauffman Center For The Performing Arts, The Middle of the Map Fest., The Folly Theatre.]

[Congratulations to Calvin and his fantastic team of co-conspirators and creators: Khitam Jabr, John P. Beatty, Ignacio Galarza III, Ashlee Fairchild Jones, production assistants, and crew. The Toxic music video earned its sixth set of laurels as an official selection of the L.A. Music Video Awards, where they were nominated for Best Music Video, Best Cover Song and Best Male Vocalist.]

3. X.WILSON – “Nobody Safe”
from: Troost Story / Intelligent Sound / June 19, 2020
[X.Wilson is a non-binary composer, producer, DJ, and story teller. Troost Story was mastered by JPINO of Intelligent Sound. Troost Story is available at http://www.xwilson.bandcamp.com. 100% of the proceeds from the sales of this recording are being donated to NAACP legal defense fund.]

4. The Black Creatures – “D’umm”
from: “Wild Echoes / The Black Creatures / September 30, 2019
[Darkpop hip-hop musical pulling elements from sci-fi to tell an inter-dimensional story. Xavier Martin and Jade Green have made an impression of the KC music community with their videos and songs, live shows in clubs, art galleries, record stores, area music festivals and shows in surrounding areas. They’ve released an EP, an album, several singles.]

5. Logan Richardson – “American Mirror (feat. Kadesh Flow)”
from: American Mirror – Single / Logan Richardson/ June 19, 2020
[Lyrics By Kadesh Flow. Music by Logan Richardson. Logan Richardson on alto saxophone, and synth keyboards. Produced by Logan Richardson. Logan Richardson was born in 1980. He is a native son of Kansas City, Missouri born, and raised. Logan Richardson is considered by top critics as a breath of fresh air for the future of music. A young star pushing the boundaries of modern improvised music, carrying the torch of vitality for improvised music as a premier alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. One of several singles being released this year from Logan Richardson who is also releasing a new album, AFROFUTURISM in September, 2020.]

10:21 – Underwriting

10:26 – Nina Songs

6. Bettye LaVette – “I Hold No Grudge”
from: Blackbirds / Verve Records / August 28, 2020
[“I Hold No Grudge” was from Nina Simone’s 1967 album, High Priestess of Soul. The songs are accompanied by a large band directed and arranged by Hal Mooney. The album contains pop songs and African American gospel and folk related songs written by Simone herself. After this album title –an attempt to broaden her appeal by management executivess– Nina Simone was sometimes titled “the high priestess of soul”, although she completely rejected the title herself, because it placed a label on her as an artist. However, according to her daughter, Simone, she never hated that moniker. The song “I Hold No Grudge” was co-written by Andy Badale, the pseudonym of Angelo Badalamenti, who later became known as the composer of the soundtracks for the films of David Lynch.] [For Bettye LaVette’s Blackbirds Steve Jordan served as producer. Blackbirds features songs primarily popularized by peers-other iconic women in music-who she respected and admired. This is the 11th studio album from Bettye LaVette, born Betty Jo Haskins, on January 29, 1946. She is an American soul singer-songwriter who made her first record at sixteen, but achieved only intermittent fame until 2005, with her album I’ve Got My Own Hell to Raise. Her eclectic musical style combines elements of soul, blues, rock and roll, funk, gospel, and country music.LaVette was born in Muskegon, Michigan, and raised in Detroit. Unlike many of her contemporaries, she did not begin singing in the church, but in her parents’ living room, singing R&B and country and western music. She was signed by Johnnie Mae Matthews, a local record producer. In 1962, aged sixteen, she recorded a single, “My Man — He’s a Lovin’ Man”, with Matthews, which became a Top Ten R&B hit after Atlantic Records bought distribution rights. This led to a tour with rhythm and blues musicians Clyde McPhatter, Ben E. King, Barbara Lynn, and then-newcomer Otis Redding. She next hit the charts with “Let Me Down Easy” on Calla Records in 1965. This led to a brief stint with The James Brown Revue. After recording several singles for local Detroit labels, LaVette signed to the Silver Fox label in 1969. She cut a handful of tracks, including two Top 40 R&B hits: “He Made A Woman Out Of Me” and “Do Your Duty”. The Memphis studio musicians on these recordings have since become known as The Dixie Flyers. In 1972, she signed once again with Atlantic/Atco. She was sent to Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Alabama to record what was to be her first full-length album. Titled Child of the Seventies, it was produced by Brad Shapiro and featured the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, now known as The Swampers, but Atco chose not to issue the album. The mid 1970s saw a brief stint and two 45s with Epic, and in 1978 she released the disco smash on West End Records “Doin’ The Best That I Can”. In 1982, she was signed by her hometown label, Motown, and sent to Nashville to record. The resulting LP (her first album actually issued), titled Tell Me A Lie, was produced by Steve Buckingham. The first single, “Right In The Middle (Of Falling In Love)” hit the R&B Top 40. She briefly gave up recording for a six-year run in the Broadway smash Bubbling Brown Sugar, appearing alongside Honi Coles and Cab Calloway. After LaVette had played her own personal mono recordings of Child of the Seventies for Gilles Petard, a French soul music collector, he sought the master recordings at Atlantic, whose personnel had previously thought they had been lost in a fire some years back. In 1999, he finally discovered the masters and then licensed the album from Atlantic and released it in 2000 as Souvenirs on his Art and Soul label. At the same time, Let Me Down Easy — Live In Concert was issued by the Dutch Munich label. Both albums sparked a renewed interest in LaVette and in 2003, A Woman Like Me (produced by Dennis Walker) was released. The CD won the 2004 W. C. Handy Award for “Comeback Blues Album of the Year”. In an interview, LaVette identified A Woman Like Me as the first album in the second phase of her career and said her 2012 autobiography was named after the album.]

7. Meshell Ndegeocello – “Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”
from: Pour une ame sourveraine – A Dedication To Nina Simone / Naive / October 12, 2012
[“Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood. Ndegeocello’s soulful, blues-inflected rendition of the pop standard opens her tribute album to Nina Simone, Pour Une Âme Souveraine. Known for her refusal to adhere to genre conventions, her progressive approach to pop music, and her fierce political activism, Simone is a clear artistic forbearer for Ndegeocello, and Pour Une Âme Souveraine both honors Simone’s legacy while allowing Ndegeocello to build on her own.” – Slant Magazine (Oct. 8, 2012). Michelle Lynn Johnson, better known as Meshell Ndegeocello was born August 29, 1968. She is an American singer-songwriter, rapper, and bassist. She has gone by the name Meshell Suhaila Bashir-Shakur which is used as a writing credit on some of her later work. Her music incorporates a wide variety of influences, including funk, soul, jazz, hip hop, reggae and rock. She has received significant critical acclaim throughout her career, and although she has never won a Grammy Award, she has been nominated ten times. She has been credited for helping to have “sparked the neo-soul movement. Pour une Âme Souveraine: A Dedication to Nina Simone is the 10th studio album. “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” is a song written by Bennie Benjamin, Horace Ott and Sol Marcus for the singer and pianist Nina Simone, who first recorded it in 1964 from the album, Broadway, Blues, Ballads. “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” has been covered by many artists, most notably by The Animals, whose blues rock version of the song became a transatlantic hit in 1965. A 1977 four-on-the-floor disco rearrangement by disco group Santa Esmeralda was also a hit, while a 1986 cover by new wave musician Elvis Costello found success in the British Isles]

8. David Bowie – “Wild Is The Wind (2010 Harry Maslin Mix)”
from: Nothing Has Changed / Parlophone Records / November 17, 2014
[“Wild Is the Wind” was written by Dimitri Tiomkin & Ned Washington for the 1957 film Wild Is the Wind. Johnny Mathis recorded the song for the film and released it as a single in November 1957. Mathis’ version reached No. 22 on the Billboard chart. It was nominated for an Academy Award. The song has been recorded many times, by many performers. The best known versions are one by Nina Simone in 1966, and one by David Bowie released in 1976 as a tribute to Simone. Nina Simone first recorded “Wild Is the Wind” live in 1959, this version appearing on the album Nina Simone at Town Hall. Her most famous interpretation of the song was a studio recording released on the compilation album Wild Is the Wind (1966), made of songs recorded for two earlier album projects. Simone reworked the song with slow, sparse instrumentation, stretching the vocal delivery to express soulful, hopeless loss. Simone’s 1966 version appeared on the trailer for the 2008 movie Revolutionary Road. David Bowie recorded”Wild Is the Wind” for his 1976 album Station to Station. Bowie was an admirer of Simone’s style, and after meeting her in Los Angeles in 1975, he was inspired to record the song for his album. Bowie later said that Simone’s version “really affected me… I recorded it as an hommage to Nina.” This was the only cover song released by Bowie during this period of his career; he wrote or co-wrote the other songs on his albums. Bowie took special care with the contemporary rock arrangement and production of “Wild Is the Wind”, committing to an emotional and romantic vocal performance, the words drawn out more slowly and with a greater sense of loss, following the 1966 Simone version rather than the Mathis original Station to Station is the 10th studio album by English musician David Bowie, released by RCA Records in 1976. Commonly regarded as one of his most significant works, Station to Station was the vehicle for his performance persona, the Thin White Duke. The album was recorded after he completed shooting Nicolas Roeg’s The Man Who Fell to Earth, and the cover artwork featured a still from the film. During the sessions, Bowie was heavily dependent on drugs, especially cocaine, and later claimed that he recalled almost nothing of the production. Musically, Station to Station was a transitional album for Bowie, developing the funk and soul music of his previous release, Young Americans, while presenting a new direction influenced by German bands such as Neu! and Kraftwerk. The album’s lyrics reflected his preoccupations with Friedrich Nietzsche, Aleister Crowley, mythology and religion. Drawing on funk and krautrock, romantic balladry and occultism, Station to Station has been described as “simultaneously one of Bowie’s most accessible albums and his most impenetrable”. Bowie himself said that Station to Station was “a plea to come back to Europe for me”.Preceded by the single “Golden Years”, Station to Station made the top five in both the UK and US charts. The musical styles explored on the album would culminate in some of Bowie’s most acclaimed work with the “Berlin Trilogy”, recorded with Brian Eno in 1977–79. In 2012, the album was ranked No. 324 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It has since been reissued multiple times and was remastered in 2016 as part of the Who Can I Be Now? (1974–1976) box set.]

9. Nina Simone – “Feeling Good”
from: I Put A Spell On You / Phillips / June, 1965
[Feeling Good” was written by English composers Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse for the musical The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd. It was first performed on stage in 1964 by Cy Grant on the UK tour and by Gilbert Price in 1965 with the original Broadway cast. Nina Simone recorded “Feeling Good” for her 1965 album I Put a Spell on You. The song has also been covered by Traffic, Michael Bublé, John Coltrane, George Michael, Victory, Eels, Joe Bonamassa, EDEN, Muse, Black Cat Bones, Sammy Davis Jr., Bassnectar, and Avicii, among others. Nina Simone’s version, arranged and produced by Hal Mooney, was recorded in New York in January 1965 and appeared on her album I Put a Spell on You. It was not released as a single at the time. In 1994, Simone’s recording was used in a British TV commercial for Volkswagen, and became popular. Released as a single, it reached no. 40 on the UK Singles Chart in July 1994. Simone’s recording was used in the film Point of No Return, and it appears on soundtracks for the movies Repo Men (2010), Last Holiday (2006), Professor Marston and the Wonder Women (2017), and the TV soundtrack Six Feet Under, Vol. 2: Everything Ends. The Bassnectar/Simone cover was used in “Chapter 6”, a first-season episode of the television series Legion.] [Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon; February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003) was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music. Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born the sixth child of a preacher’s family in North Carolina, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. Her musical path changed direction after she was denied a scholarship to the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, despite a well-received audition. Simone was later told by someone working at Curtis that she was rejected because she was black. When she began playing in a small club in Philadelphia to fund her continuing musical education and become a classical pianist she was required to sing as well. She was approached for a recording by Bethlehem Records, and her rendering of “I Loves You, Porgy” was a hit in the United States in 1958. Over the length of her career Simone recorded more than 40 albums, mostly between 1958—when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue—and 1974. Her musical style arose from a fusion of gospel and pop songs with classical music, in particular with influences from her first inspiration, Johann Sebastian Bach, and accompanied with her expressive jazz-like singing in her characteristic contralto. She injected as much of her classical background into her music as possible to give it more depth and quality, as she felt that pop music was inferior to classical. Her intuitive grasp on the audience–performer relationship was gained from a unique background of playing piano accompaniment for church revivals and sermons regularly from the early age of six years old. In the early 1960s, she became involved in the civil rights movement and the direction of her life shifted once again. Simone’s music was highly influential in the fight for equal rights in the United States. In later years, she lived abroad, finally settling in France in 1992. She received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 2000 and was a fifteen-time Grammy Award nominee over the course of her career.]

10. Special Interest – “Young, Gifted, Black, In Leather”
from: Spiraling / Records DK / February 28, 2018
[Produced By Quintron. Mastered by Will Killingsworth at Dead Air Studios. Special Interest is a four piece punk band emerging from New Orleans, Louisiana. Combining elements of No-Wave, Glam, and Industrial Special Interest create a frenetic and urgent revisioning of punk and electronic music for a modern world gone mad. Propulsive drum machines, a swirling layer of detuned samples, and a driving bass line create the foundation across which angular guitar work and dissonant synth lines glide. Front and center are Alli Logout’s commanding vocals and razor sharp lyrics moving from high camp satire to insightful political imperatives often within the course of one song. Special Interest initially formed in 2015 to play one show in a basement. Originally a two-piece with Alli Logout and Maria Elena playing guitars and power tools over the beat of a 70’s Univox drum machine. Soon after they ditched the power tools and were joined by Ruth Mascelli on electronics and Nathan Cassiani on bass. Special Interest quickly gained a reputation for their intense and energetic live shows. A dense wall of sound oscillating from aggressive and noisy to joyous and danceable punctuated by the no holds barred on stage persona of their vocalist. Special Interest have embarked on several short tours of the southeast and have traveled to play festivals such as Suoni Per Popolo, Slut Island, and Not Dead Yet. Their debut album Spiraling w as recorded in New Orleans in 2017 by organist, inventor, and fixture of the local underground music scene Quintron. The first new release on Brice Nice’s Raw Sugar label since 2011, Spiraling is perhaps the sum of its members influences. Which is, to say, everything. They are currently working on a follow up LP to be released in the US on Thrilling Living and in the UK/Europe on Night School Records.]

11. Special Interest – “All Tomorrow’s Carry”
from: The Passion Of / Thrilling Living / June 19, 2020
[“But would you bat an eye waiting for war machines to pass you by? But aren’t we going out tonight? Aren’t we going out? “ Special Interest have returned with their sophomore LP. A dual release from Night School (EU) and Thrilling Living (US). The Passion Of… combines elements of glam rock and no wave pushed through a mangled filter of contemporary electronic forms. Special Interest present a precise and deranged vision of punk, an apocalyptic celebration, a step forward into a perverse and uncertain landscape. Recorded & mixed by James Whitten. Mastered by Rashad Becker. Cover painting by Tamara Santibañez. Special Interest is baed in New Orleans and is made up with: Alli Logout on vocals & lyrics, Nathan Cassiani on bass, Maria Elena on guitar, and Ruth Mascelli on electronics

BLACKSTARKIDS

12. BLACKSTARKIDS – “Wigs”
from: SURF / Bedroom Records / February 28, 2020
[Second album from, BlackStarKids, a pop/R&B/hip-hop group based in Kansas City, Missouri. Members include: TheBabeGabe, Deiondre, and TyFaizon (of the Drop Dead XX collective). The group released its first album, Let’s Play Sports, in 2019. Blackstarkids,recently caught the attention of The 1975’s frontman Matty Healy and now they’re signed to The 1975’s management company, Dirty Hit Records and they were just featured in Clash Magazine,]

13. Ondist – “Gather Up The World”
from: No Coincidence / Bikiniwax Records / June 12, 2020
[Corbin Dooley, Nick Poortman, and Maya Coppola are Ondist. With divergent backgrounds rooted in Arkansas, New Zealand, and New York, the trio connected in Los Angeles. Recording in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas brought environmental influences to the center of the Ondist sound, which is united by its cinematic vision of hope. Ondist is a recording project created by Corbin Dooley with singer songwriter Maya Coppola (Imani’s sister) and Nick Poortman. Corbin Dooley signed Nine Inch nails to TVT Records in 1990. He managed Blur, and Tekronic.

11:00 – Station ID

14. Ondist – “Interstate Love Song”
from: No Coincidence / Bikiniwax Records / June 12, 2020
[“Interstate Love Song” is a song by Stone Temple Pilots, released in 1994, from the band’s second studio album, Purple.Corbin Dooley, Nick Poortman, and Maya Coppola are Ondist. With divergent backgrounds rooted in Arkansas, New Zealand, and New York, the trio connected in Los Angeles. Recording in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas brought environmental influences to the center of the Ondist sound, which is united by its cinematic vision of hope. Ondist is a recording project created by Corbin Dooley with singer songwriter Maya Coppola (Imani’s sister) and Nick Poortman. Corbin Dooley signed Nine Inch nails to TVT Records in 1990. He managed Blur, and Tekronic. Kansas City based drummer, producer and engineer Sam Platt told us about how he grew up in Carthage Missouri where Corbin Dooley would visit during summers, staying with is grandparents. Sam explained that recently Corbin with Ondist has been traveling around the country, recording songs. Corbin asked Sam to put a band together for some Kansas City sessions. It was such a success that Corbin has been back twice to record. Corbin flew in producer Nadir Omawale from Detroit and Luke John from Memphis. Recordings took place at Weights and Measures with Duane Trower. For this track: Claire Adams on lead vocals, Sam Platt on drums, Eddie Moore on keyboards, DeAndre Manning on bass, Jamie Anderson on guitar. Sam Platt told us that over 20 songs were recorded, 14 originals, 6 covers. Corbin Dooley narrowed down a few for Claire Adams to sing. From these recordings and others 14 songs ended up on No Coincidence. Sam Platt flew to LA to record and played on tracks with Nick Gaffeney a drummer from New Zealand. Sam said the rest of the albums sounds like it mostly features the Kansas City musicians, or played/programmed by Corbin, Nick and Maya.

Sam Platt on the July 8, 2020 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI.

11:04 – Interview with Sam Platt

KC based drummer & producer Sam Platt joins us to talk about the new album No Coincidence, from the L.A. based band Ondist. No Coincidence was recorded in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas. Ondist is Corbin Dooley, Maya Coppola, and Nick Poortman. Corbin Dooley asked Sam to put a band together for KC sessions. Recordings took place at Weights & Measures with Duane Trower. The KC band included: Sam Platt on drums, Eddie Moore on keyboards, DeAndre Manning on bass, Jamie Anderson on guitar, and Claire Adams on vocals. More info at http://www.ondistmusic.com

Sam Platt, Thank you for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley.

Corbin Dooley, Nick Poortman, and Maya Coppola are Ondist. With divergent backgrounds rooted in Arkansas, New Zealand, and New York, the trio connected in L.A.

Recording in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas brought environmental influences to the center of the Ondist sound, which is united by its cinematic vision of hope. Ondist is a recording project created by Corbin Dooley with singer songwriter Maya Coppola (Imani’s sister) and Nick Poortman.

Corbin Dooley signed Nine Inch nails to TVT Records in 1990. He managed Blur, and Tekronic.

Kansas City based drummer, producer and engineer Sam Platt told us about how he grew up in Carthage Missouri where Corbin Dooley would visit during summers, staying with is grandparents. Sam explained that recenlty Corbin with Ondist has been traveling around the country, recording songs.

Corbin asked Sam to put a band together for some Kansas City sessions. It was such a success that Corbin has been back twice to record. Corbin flew in producer Nadir Omawale from Detroit and Luke John from Memphis. Recordings took place at Weights and Measures with Duane Trower. For this track: Claire Adams on lead vocals, Sam Platt on drums, Eddie Moore on keyboards, DeAndre Manning on bass, Jamie Anderson on guitar. Sam Platt told us that over 20 songs were recorded, 14 originals, 6 covers. Corbin Dooley narrowed down a few for Claire Adams to sing.

From these recordings and others 14 songs ended up on No Coincidence. Sam Platt flew to LA to record and played on tracks with Nick Gaffeney a drummer from New Zealand. Sam said the rest of the albums sounds like it mostly features the Kansas City musicians, or played/programmed by Corbin, Nick and Maya.

Sam Platt is from Carthage Missouri School, graduated 1986, and spent that summer playing tympani and throughout Europe with the United States Collegiate Wind Ensemble. After 3 years at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, he moved to Boston to finish his degree at the Berklee School of Music. In 1991 he moved back to Kansas City, and received his Master of Arts in Music at the UMKC and started playing 3 nights a week with Billy Meynier and James Albright at the Majestic Steakhouse. Moves to Laguna Beach in 1995. Recording Internship at Future Post. Taught at Capistrano Valley high school and music stores in Orange County and Burbank. Taught jazz and toured in the summers at the Chopin School of Music in Warsaw Poland. In 1996 bought Redhouse Recording in Lawrence Ks, and began recording music, commercials, and audio for video. Sold studio to Getupkids in 2003.

Platt currently playing with RSS Trio, Jeff Shirley Trio, Ken Lovern’s Organ Jazz Trio, performed with Bob Brookmeyer, Bobby Foster, Gary Foster, Micheal Urbaniak, Matthew Garrison, Chris Cheek, Seamus Blake, Doug Talley, Milt Abel, Nathan Granner, and Gerald Trottman. Rock bands include: Pendergast, Ricky Dean Sinatra, Expassionates, Kristie Stremel, The Naughty Pines, The Sunflower Colonels, Kasey Rausch, Fred Wickham Hadacol Caravan, the Billybats, duo with Jason Vivone went to IBC finals in Memphis. Currently head of audio at the American Jazz Museum, just finished 6 weeks of streaming bands 6 nights a week.

His recording clients include: The Bach Aria Soloists, James Clay, Sequira Costa, Micheal W. Smith, Anhauser Busch, all audio recorded, edited and mastered over 10,000 files for the Liberty Memorial World War I Museum, FedEx, Second Story Productions, the Speed Channel, the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, the Outdoor Channel, Disney, John Deere, Dairy Queen, University of Kansas, Washburn University, Baker University, and Southwest Airlines.

He has composed music for Slim 4 Life, Frontier Broadband, Dish Network, John Deere, Grundfos, Seimans, and Liquid 9 Advertising Agency

Sam Platt, Thank you for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley.

The new Ondist album No Coincidence was recorded in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas. Corbin Dooley asked Sam Platt to put a band together for KC sessions. Recordings took place at Weights & Measures with Duane Trower. The KC band included: Sam Platt on drums, Eddie Moore on keyboards, DeAndre Manning on bass, Jamie Anderson on guitar, and Claire Adams on vocals. More info at http://www.ondistmusic.com

11:19

15. Ondist – “No Rain”
from: No Coincidence / Bikiniwax Records / June 12, 2020
[No Rain” is a song by American rock band Blind Melon. It was released in 1993 as the second single from the band’s debut album Blind Melon. Corbin Dooley, Nick Poortman, and Maya Coppola are Ondist. With divergent backgrounds rooted in Arkansas, New Zealand, and New York, the trio connected in Los Angeles. Recording in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas brought environmental influences to the center of the Ondist sound, which is united by its cinematic vision of hope. Ondist is a recording project created by Corbin Dooley with singer songwriter Maya Coppola (Imani’s sister) and Nick Poortman. Corbin Dooley signed Nine Inch nails to TVT Records in 1990. He managed Blur, and Tekronic. Kansas City based drummer, producer and engineer Sam Platt told us about how he grew up in Carthage Missouri where Corbin Dooley would visit during summers, staying with is grandparents. Sam explained that recenlty Corbin with Ondist has been traveling around the country, recording songs. Corbin asked Sam to put a band together for some Kansas City sessions. It was such a success that Corbin has been back twice to record. Corbin flew in producer Nadir Omawale from Detroit and Luke John from Memphis. Recordings took place at Weights and Measures with Duane Trower. For this track: Claire Adams on lead vocals, Sam Platt on drums, Eddie Moore on keyboards, DeAndre Manning on bass, Jamie Anderson on guitar. Sam Platt told us that over 20 songs were recorded, 14 originals, 6 covers. Corbin Dooley narrowed down a few for Claire Adams to sing. From these recordings and others 14 songs ended up on No Coincidence. Sam Platt flew to LA to record and played on tracks with Nick Gaffeney a drummer from New Zealand. Sam said the rest of the albums sounds like it mostly features the Kansas City musicians, or played/programmed by Corbin, Nick and Maya.

Lava Dreams aka Julia Hamilton

16. Lava Dreams – “Catch A Vibe”
from: “Good Energy + Focus / Lava Dreams / June 13, 2020
[Written by Lava Dreams and produced by Duncan Burnett. Solo artist Lava Dreams aka Julia Hamilton writes songs influenced by pop, soul, RnB, jazz, trap, house, funk, reggae, rock, and world music. Hailing from Kansas City, MO, her guitar-based music is both dreamy & electric. Lava Dreams began writing lyrics and melodies as a young child. Growing up, she learned to play her first guitar chords from her father – who played around the house and in local bars. After playing guitar and singing in several Kansas City bands as a teenager, she set out to become a solo artist in 2018. Julia Hamilton is also a film maker who received her Bachelor’s of Arts degree in Film from Avila Unversity. You can listen to Lava Dreams on Spotify, iTunes, Tidal, Deezer, Google Play, YouTube Music, SoundCloud, Bandcamp, or at LavaDreamsMusic.com ]

11:26 – Underwriting

Photo of Krystle Warren by Matthew Placek
http://www.matthewplacek.com/

17. Krystle Warren – “Sunday Comfort”
from: Circles / Because Music / March 13, 2009
[Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections. Krystle followed up Love Songs with her 2017 album Three The Hard Way, Produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones.]

18. Aretha Franklin – “Don’t Play That Song”
from: 30 Greatest Hits / Atlantic Records / January 1, 1985
[Don’t Play That Song (You Lied)” is a song written by Ahmet Ertegun and the wife of soul singer Ben E. King, Betty Nelson. It was first recorded by King and was the title track on his third album Don’t Play That Song! (1962). The song reached number 2 on the U.S. R&B singles chart and number 11 on the pop chart when released as a single on Atco Records in 1962. // Aretha Franklin covered the song for her nineteenth studio album, Spirit in the Dark, released on Atlantic Records in 1970. Her version, performed with the Dixie Flyers, was released as a single in 1970 and peaked at number 1 for five weeks on the R&B singles chart and number 11 on the pop chart. Franklin’s version was certified gold with sales over a million copies. It reached number 13 on the UK Singles Chart. This was the first of two covers Franklin did of songs made popular by King. The other was her cover of “Spanish Harlem” in 1971. // Aretha Louise Franklin (March 25, 1942 – August 16, 2018) was an American singer, songwriter, actress, pianist, and civil rights activist. Franklin began her career as a child singing gospel at New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan, where her father C. L. Franklin was a minister. At the age of 18, she embarked on a secular-music career as a recording artist for Columbia Records. While Franklin’s career did not immediately flourish, she found acclaim and commercial success after signing with Atlantic Records in 1966. Hit songs such as “I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)”, “Respect”, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman”, “Chain of Fools”, “Think”, and “I Say a Little Prayer” propelled her past her musical peers. By the end of the 1960s, Aretha Franklin had come to be known as the “Queen of Soul”. // Franklin continued to record acclaimed albums such as I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You (1967), Lady Soul (1968), Spirit in the Dark (1970), Young, Gifted and Black (1972), Amazing Grace (1972), and Sparkle (1976) before experiencing problems with her record company. Franklin left Atlantic in 1979 and signed with Arista Records. She appeared in the 1980 film The Blues Brothers before releasing the successful albums Jump to It (1982), Who’s Zoomin’ Who? (1985), and Aretha (1986) on the Arista label. In 1998, Franklin returned to the Top 40 with the Lauryn Hill-produced song “A Rose Is Still a Rose”; later, she released an album of the same name which was certified gold. That same year, Franklin earned international acclaim for her performance of “Nessun dorma” at the Grammy Awards; she filled in at the last minute for Luciano Pavarotti, who canceled his appearance after the show had already begun. In a widely noted performance, she paid tribute to 2015 honoree Carole King by singing “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” at the Kennedy Center Honors. // Franklin recorded 112 charted singles on Billboard, including 77 Hot 100 entries, 17 top-ten pop singles, 100 R&B entries, and 20 number-one R&B singles. Besides the foregoing, Franklin’s well-known hits also include “Ain’t No Way”, “Call Me”, “Don’t Play That Song (You Lied)”, “Spanish Harlem”, “Rock Steady”, “Day Dreaming”, “Until You Come Back to Me (That’s What I’m Gonna Do)”, “Something He Can Feel”, “Jump to It”, “Freeway of Love”, “Who’s Zoomin’ Who”, and “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)” (a duet with George Michael). She won 18 Grammy Awards,[5] including the first eight awards given for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (1968–1975). Franklin is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 75 million records worldwide. // Franklin received numerous honors throughout her career. She was awarded the National Medal of Arts and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 1987, she became the first female performer to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. She also was inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005 and into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 2012. In 2010, Rolling Stone magazine ranked her number one on its list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time” and number nine on its list of “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”. The Pulitzer Prize jury in 2019 awarded Franklin a posthumous special citation “for her indelible contribution to American music and culture for more than five decades.”]

19. George Jackson – “Aretha, Sing One For Me”
from: The Blues Sessions / Hi Records – Fat Possum Records / May 28, 2013
[George Henry Jackson (March 12, 1945 – April 14, 2013) was an American blues, rhythm & blues, rock and soul songwriter and singer. His prominence was as a prolific and skilled songwriter; he wrote or co-wrote many hit songs for other musicians, including “Down Home Blues,” “One Bad Apple”, “Old Time Rock and Roll” and “The Only Way Is Up”. As a southern soul singer he recorded fifteen singles between 1963 and 1985, with some success. // Jackson was born in Indianola, Mississippi, and moved with his family to Greenville at the age of five. He started writing songs while in his teens, and in 1963 introduced himself to Ike Turner. Turner took him to Cosimo Matassa’s studios in New Orleans to record “Nobody Wants to Cha Cha With Me” for his Prann label, but it was not successful. Jackson then traveled to Memphis to promote his songs, but was rejected by Stax before helping to form vocal group The Ovations with Louis Williams at Goldwax Records. Jackson wrote and sang on their 1965 hit “It’s Wonderful To Be in Love”, which reached no.61 on the Billboard Hot 100 and no.22 on the R&B chart. He also wrote for other artists at Goldwax, including Spencer Wiggins and James Carr, and recorded with Dan Greer as the duo George and Greer. After the Ovations split up in 1968, he recorded briefly for Hi Records, and also for Decca using the pseudonym Bart Jackson. As a singer, he had a versatile tenor that was influenced by Sam Cooke, and released many records over the years, for a host of different labels, but his recordings never made him a star. // At the suggestion of record producer Billy Sherrill, Jackson moved to Rick Hall’s FAME Studios at Muscle Shoals in the late 1960s, Alabama, where he wrote for leading singers including Clarence Carter – whose “Too Weak To Fight” reached no.13 on the pop chart and no.3 on the R&B chart in 1968 – Wilson Pickett, and Candi Staton. Some of Jackson’s songs for Staton, including her first hit in 1969, “I’d Rather Be An Old Man’s Sweetheart (Than A Young Man’s Fool)”, are “widely regarded as examples of some of the finest southern soul ever recorded by a female artist, with lyrics that were full of meaning and innuendo, a hallmark of Jackson’s best work.” Jackson also recorded for Fame Records, and had his first chart success as a singer in 1970 with “That’s How Much You Mean To Me”, which reached no. 48 on the R&B chart. The Osmonds visited the FAME studio in 1970, and heard and liked Jackson’s song “One Bad Apple”, which he had originally written with The Jackson 5 in mind. The Osmonds recorded the song, and it became the group’s first hit, rising to the top of the Hot 100 in February 1971; it also reached no.6 on the R&B chart. // In 1972 he briefly rejoined the Hi label, and had his second and last solo recording success with “Aretha, Sing One For Me”, an answer song to Aretha Franklin’s “Don’t Play That Song”; Jackson’s song reached no.38 on the R&B chart. He then released several singles for MGM Records, while continuing to write for other artists. In the early 1970s he began working as a songwriter for the Muscle Shoals Sound Studio and, with Thomas Jones III, wrote “Old Time Rock and Roll” which Bob Seger recorded in 1978; Seger’s version reached no.28 on the pop chart. While with Muscle Shoals Sound, he also wrote “Down Home Blues”, recorded by Z.Z. Hill, which became a theme tune for Malaco Records in the 1980s; “Unlock Your Mind”, recorded by the Staple Singers and a no.16 R&B hit in 1978; and “The Only Way Is Up”, originally recorded by Otis Clay in 1980. A version of “The Only Way Is Up” by Yazz & The Plastic Population reached no.1 on the UK singles chart, and no.2 on the Billboard dance chart, in 1988. // In 1983, Jackson formed his own publishing company, Happy Hooker Music, before joining Malaco Records as a staff songwriter. There he wrote hits for Johnnie Taylor, Bobby Bland, Latimore, Denise LaSalle, and Z.Z. Hill. He recorded an album of his own songs, Heart To Heart Collect, in 1991 for Hep’ Me Records. In 2011, a compilation CD of his FAME recordings, Don’t Count Me Out, was released. // Jackson died on April 14, 2013, at his home in Ridgeland, Mississippi, from cancer at the age of 68. He left a son and two grandchildren.]

Royce “Sauce” Handy

20. They Call Me Sauce – “Be Real Black For Me”
from: Be Real Black For Me – Single / NuBlvckCity / June 23, 2020
[Produced by Mike Dupree. Recorded, mixed and mastered by Royce “Sauce” HandyOne of three new singles released by They Call Me Sauce this year, so far. Sauce writes, “Be Real Black for Me is inspired by Donny Hathaway & Roberta Flack’s 1972 duet of the same name. This is also the song that producer Mike Dupree uses as a sample in the song. Dupree, a multi-platinum music producer and more (Kendrick Lamar, T.I. Trey Songz, and more), released a series of free instrumentals for the fight against racism and directed artists to use them as they please.” Royce “Sauce” Handy is a rapper, a songwriter, a beat maker, a designer, a teacher, an MC, a business owner, a social media manager, a husband, a father., a community organizer. He has worked with the AdHoc Group Against Crime, Teens in Transition, Storytellers Inc., Arts Tech, Mid-America Regional Council, UMKC, Representative Brandon Ellington, Mayor Sly James. He is co-owner of The Rap Asylum, We are RAP, and owner of Melanin Connoisseur. Sauce has collaborated with visual artists, and the hip hop community. In 2017 Sauce released his EP, Summer Sauce which was part of WMM’s 117 Best Recordings of 2017. In 2018 Sauce released Soul Food 4. In 2019 his collective NuBvckCity with Kartez Marcel, Mae C, and VP3 released the single “All Night” / “Alive”.]

Stephonne Singleton Photography by Paul Andrews Photography // Makeup by Janette RiiRii Noriega // Styling by Alex Nivens and Stephonne Singleton.

21. Stephonne Singleton – “Want Me”
from: “Want Me” – Single / Glory Blue Music / April 26, 2019
[Co-produced by, Justin Mantooth, and recorded at Westend Recording Studios. Johnny Hamil on bass, Ben Byard on guitar and Adam McKee on drums. Stephonne grew up in KCK. He released his debut album, “Caged Bird Sings Songs About Red Beard.” The album was one of WMM’s 118 Best Recordings of 2018. Stephonnewas born and raised in Wyandotte County, Kansas. He has performed in mutiple shows for Late Night Theatre. Stephonne told John Long of Camp Magazine “I was surrounded by records, and my parents always had music on.” A special video for “Want Me” was just released. “Want Me” is part of a new 4-song EP to be released laterthis month]

[Stephonne Singleton will be our guest nest week on WMM]

22. Aimee Mann – “Wise Up”
from: Magnolia: Music from the Motion Picture / Warner Music / December 7, 1999
[Magnolia: Music from the Motion Picture is the soundtrack album to the film of the same name. Largely composed of works by Aimee Mann, enough such that she receives a title billing on the album, it features tracks by Gabrielle, Supertramp and Jon Brion. The album has been received positively by critics.
Paul Thomas Anderson stated that Magnolia was inspired by Mann’s music. Many of the songs feature prominently within the film, with “Wise Up” even being sung by the cast at one point, but only two of the songs were written expressly for the film, those being “You Do” and “Save Me”. “Save Me” would garner Mann an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song, losing to Phil Collins’s song “You’ll Be in My Heart” from TarzanAimee Mann (born September 8, 1960) is an American singer-songwriter. In the 1980s Mann was the bassist and a vocalist for ‘Til Tuesday, and wrote their top-ten single “Voices Carry”. She released her debut solo album, Whatever, in 1993, and has released many albums since. In 1999, Mann recorded songs for the soundtrack to the Paul Thomas Anderson film Magnolia, which earned Academy Award and Grammy Award nominations for the song “Save Me”. She has won two Grammy Awards and was named one of the world’s ten greatest living songwriters by NPR in 2006. She negotiated a contract release from David Geffen and founded her own label, SuperEgo Records.]

23. Billy Preston – “Blackbird”
from: Ultimate Collection: Billy Preston / Universal Music / January 1 10, 2000
[Often referred to as the fifth Beatle, Prestin covers the song written by Paul McCartney originally for the Beatles White Album. “Blackbird” was recorded by Billy Preston for his 7th studio album Music Is My Life, released October 8, 1972 on A & M Records. // William Everett Preston (September 2, 1946 – June 6, 2006) was an American musician whose work encompassed R&B, rock, soul, funk, and gospel. Preston was a top session keyboardist in the 1960s, during which he backed artists such as Little Richard, Sam Cooke, Ray Charles, Reverend James Cleveland, and the Beatles. He went on to achieve fame as a solo artist with hit singles such as “That’s the Way God Planned It”, the Grammy-winning “Outa-Space”, “Will It Go Round in Circles”, “Space Race”, “Nothing from Nothing”, and “With You I’m Born Again”. Additionally, Preston co-wrote “You Are So Beautiful”, which became a #5 hit for Joe Cocker. Preston was one of five musicians credited on a Beatles recording other than the group’s four members. Preston continued to record and perform with other artists, notably George Harrison after the Beatles’ breakup, and Eric Clapton, and he played keyboards for the Rolling Stones on many of the group’s albums and tours during the 1970s. ” Preston first met the Beatles as a 16-year-old in 1962, while part of Little Richard’s touring band, when their manager Brian Epstein organized a Liverpool show, at which the Beatles opened. The Washington Post explained their subsequent meeting. // They’d hook up again in 1969, when the Beatles were about to break up while recording the last album they released, Let It Be (they would later record Abbey Road, which was released prior to Let It Be). George Harrison, a friend of Preston, had quit, walked out of the studio and gone to a Ray Charles concert in London, where Preston was playing organ. Harrison brought Preston back to the studio, where his keen musicianship and gregarious personality temporarily calmed the tension. // Preston is one of several people referred to as the “Fifth Beatle”. At one point during the Get Back sessions, John Lennon proposed the idea of having him join the band (to which Paul McCartney countered that it was difficult enough reaching agreements with four). Preston played organ and electric piano for the Beatles during several of the Get Back sessions; some of these sessions appeared in the film Let It Be and on its companion album. Preston also accompanied the band on electric piano for its rooftop concert, the group’s final public appearance. In April 1969, their single “Get Back” was credited to “The Beatles with Billy Preston”, the only time such a joint credit had been given on an official Beatles-sanctioned release (as distinct from an unsanctioned reissue of some Hamburg-era recordings on which they were the backing group for Tony Sheridan). The credit was bestowed by the Beatles to reflect the extent of Preston’s presence on the track; his electric piano is prominent throughout and he plays an extended solo. Preston also worked, in a more limited role, on the Abbey Road album, contributing organ to the tracks “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” and “Something”. // In 1978, he appeared as Sgt. Pepper in Robert Stigwood’s film Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which was based on the Beatles’ album of the same name, and sang and danced to “Get Back” as the penultimate song. // Although the details did not become fully known to the general public until after his death, Preston struggled throughout his life to cope with his homosexuality, and the lasting effects of the traumatic sexual abuse he suffered as a boy. Although his sexual orientation became known to friends and associates in the music world (such as Keith Richards), Preston did not publicly come out as gay until just before he died: partly because he felt that it conflicted with his deeply held religious beliefs and his lifelong association with the church, he was in the closet until shortly before his death. Keith Richards in his autobiography, Life, mentioned Preston’s struggles with his homosexuality. // In an interview for a 2010 BBC Radio 4 documentary on his life and career, Preston’s manager Joyce Moore revealed that after she began handling his affairs, Preston opened up to her about the lifelong trauma he had suffered as the result of being sexually abused as a child. Preston told Moore that at about the age of nine, after he and his mother moved to Los Angeles from Houston to perform in a touring production of Amos ‘n’ Andy, he was repeatedly abused by the touring company’s pianist. When Preston told his mother about the abuse, she did not believe him, and failed to protect him. The abuse went on for the entire summer, and Preston was also later abused by a local pastor. // Another traumatic incident, which reportedly affected Preston deeply, occurred in the early 1970s, while he was engaged to actress/model Kathy Silva. At this time Preston had become close friends with musician Sly Stone, and made many contributions to Stone’s recordings of the period (including the landmark album There’s a Riot Goin’ On). According to Moore, Preston was devastated when he came home one day to find Stone in bed with Silva (who later famously married Stone on stage at Madison Square Garden). According to Moore, Silva’s affair with Stone was the trigger that led Preston to stop having relationships with women. It was after this incident that he began abusing cocaine and having sex with men, and Moore has stated that she saw his drug abuse as his way of coping with the internal conflicts he felt about his sexual urges]

24. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

11:58 – Community Voices

Next week on Wednesday, July 15Stephonne Singleton joins us to talk about his new EP and the New Video for his song “Want Me.” We will also talk with KC based singer songwriter Heath Church about his new song “The Stranger.” Plus, we will feature music included in a new compilation titled Black Lives Matter, from KC based label French Exit Records with all proceeds from this release being donated to One Struggle KC‘s Liberation Fund. One Struggle KC is a Black-led coalition of Kansas City activists seeking to connect the struggles of oppressed communities, locally and globally. Learn more about the Liberation Fund here: actionnetwork.org/fundraising/it-aint-over-legal-fund

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Stephonne Singleton photo by Paul Andrews Photograph
Calvin Arsenia photo by Jenny Wheat Photography
Krystle Warren photo by Manu Noyon
Nina Simone photo by Jack Robinson – Getty Images

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #845

WMM features Songs of Nina Simone + Sam Platt on Ondist + New & MidCoastal Releases

Stephonne Singleton photo by Paul Andrews Photograph. Calvin Arsenia photo by Jenny Wheat Photography. Krystle Warren photo by Manu Noyon. Nina Simone photo by Jack Robinson – Getty Images

Wednesday MidDay Medley
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Sam Platt talks about Ondist + Nina Songs
+ New & MidCoastal Releases

Mark plays more New & MidCoastal Releases from: Blackstarkids, The Black Creatures, Logan Richardson with Kadesh Flow, Lava Dreams, Krystle Warren, Calvin Arsenia, They Call Me Sauce, X.Wilson, Special Interest, Stephonne Singleton, Ondist, Bettye LaVette, Nina Simone, Meshell Ndegeocello, David Bowie, Aretha Franklin, George Jackson, Aimee Mann and Billy Preston.

At 11:00 KC based drummer & producer Sam Platt talks about the new album No Coincidence, from the L.A. band Ondist, with members from Arkansas, New Zealand, and New York. No Coincidence was recorded in Malibu, Dallas, Kansas City, and Las Vegas. Ondist is Corbin Dooley, Maya Coppola, and Nick Poortman. Corbin Dooley asked Sam to put a band together for KC sessions. Corbin flew in producer Nadir Omawale from Detroit and Luke John from Memphis. Recordings took place at Weights & Measures with Duane Trower. The KC band included: Sam Platt on drums, Eddie Moore on keyboards, DeAndre Manning on bass, Jamie Anderson on guitar, and Claire Adams on vocals. Over 20 songs were recorded, 14 originals, 6 covers. More info at http://www.ondistmusic.com

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #845

Stephonne Singleton photo by Paul Andrews Photograph
Calvin Arsenia photo by Jenny Wheat Photography
Krystle Warren photo by Manu Noyon
Nina Simone photo by Jack Robinson – Getty Images

WMM Playlist from Jan. 15, 2020

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

WMM Celebrates MLK

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / Universal / Dec. 20, 1979
[WMM’s theme]

2. Soweto Gospel Choir – “Pride (In The Name of Love)”
from: In the Name of Love – Africa Celebrates U2 / Shout! Factory Records / 2008
[Formed in Soweto, South Africa, by David Mulovhedzi & Beverly Bryer, two choir directors. The 30-member ensemble blends African gospel, Negro spirituals, reggae and American popular music. The group performed at the first of the 46664 concerts for Nelson Mandela and has toured internationally. Their albums Blessed and African Spirit won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2007 and 2008.]

3. International Noise Conspiracy / MLK Jr. – “The First Conspiracy / Let Freedom Ring”
from: Adbusters – Live Without Dead Time / Adbusters / 2003
[The (International) Noise Conspiracy (abbreviated T(I)NC) were a Swedish rock band formed in Sweden in the late months of 1998. The line-up consists of Dennis Lyxzén (vocals), Inge Johansson (bass), Lars Strömberg (guitar), and Ludwig Dahlberg (drums). The band is known for its punk and garage rock musical influences, and its impassioned left-wing political stance. Influenced by a quote from 1960’s folk singer Phil Ochs, according to lead singer Lyxzén, the band wanted to achieve an ideal blend of music and politics that was, “a cross between Elvis Presley and Che Guevara.”]

4. Labelle – “Something in The Air / The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” (CD #4) (5:55)
from: Something Silver / Warner Archives / 1997 [orig. Pressure Cookin’ / 1973, 3rd album from the funk/soul trio of: Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx and Sarah Dash who each shared a rap on “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. It was the B-side to Scott-Heron’s first single, “Home Is Where the Hatred Is”, from his album Pieces of a Man (1971). “Something in the Air” is a song orig. recorded by Thunderclap Newman, a band created by Pete Townshend for The Who’s former roadie John ‘Speedy’ Keen who wrote and sang the song. It was a UK #1 single for three weeks in July 1969.]

10:10

Wednesday MidDay Medley celebrates the life of human rights icon, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born Jan. 15, 1929.

MLK led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, was a cofounder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, and served as it’s first president. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his, “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination thru civil disobedience and non-violent means.

By the time of his death in 1968, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War. King was assassinated, April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I.

As Pete Seeger wrote: “Songs gave them the courage to believe they would not fail.” Today we feature music of and inspired by the civil rights movement from: Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project (featuring Glenn North), Kelly Hunt, Krystle Warren, Laura Love, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, Pops Staples, Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, The Holmes Brothers, The Chambers Brothers, The Isley Brothers, Pete Seeger, Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion. We started w/: Soweto Gospel Choir, The Intl. Noise Conspiracy, and Labelle.

10:14 – Soul Brother…

MLK said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

MLK said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

5. Curtis Mayfield – “Beautiful Brother of Mine”
from: Roots / Curtom-Buddah / October, 1971 [2nd solo release from Curtis Mayfield, born in Chicago, June 3, 1942. One of the most influential musicians behind soul & politically conscious African-American music. Mayfield started his musical career in a gospel choir. Moving to the North Side of Chicago he met Jerry Butler in 1956 at the age of 14, and joined vocal group The Impressions. As a songwriter, Mayfield became noted as one of the first musicians to bring more prevalent themes of social awareness into soul music. In 1965, he wrote “People Get Ready” for The Impressions, which displayed his more politically charged songwriting. After leaving The Impressions in 1970, Mayfield released several albums, including the soundtrack for the blaxploitation film Super Fly in 1972. The soundtrack was noted for its socially conscious themes, mostly addressing problems surrounding inner city minorities such as crime, poverty and drug abuse. Mayfield was paralyzed from the neck down after lighting equipment fell on him during a live performance at Wingate Field in Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York, on August 13, 1990. Despite this, he continued his career as a recording artist, releasing his final album, New World Order, in 1996. Mayfield won a Grammy Legend Award in 1994 and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995, and was a double inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a member of the Impressions in 1991, and again in 1999 as a solo artist. He was also a 2-time Grammy Hall of Fame inductee. He died from complications of type 2 diabetes, Dec 26, 1999, at 57.]

6. Maceo & The Macks – “Soul Power ’74”
from: James Brown’s Funky People, Pt. 2 / People Records / 1988
[This record is sampled more than crackers and cheese at Costco, it contains samples itself in the form of tape overlays of civil rights rallies, a Dr. King speech, and an announcement of King’s assassination. Maceo Parker played saxophone with James Brown, Parliment, Funkadelic, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and Prince.]

7. Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell & Spirit of Praise – “Ella’s Song”
from: Soundtrack to Boycott / HBO / 2001
[Critically acclaimed 2001 film staring Jeffrey Wright as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Terrence Howard as Ralph Abernathy, and CCH Pounder as Jo Ann Robinson.]

10:28 – Underwriting

10:30 – King’s Life, Death, and Spirit.

MLK said, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

8. Mahalia Jackson – “How I Got Over”
from: The Original Apollo Sessions / Couch & Madison Partners / May 25, 2013
[Gospel hymn composed & published in 1951 by Clara Ward (1924-1973). It was performed by Mahalia Jackson at the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 before 250,000 people. Mahalia Jackson (Oct. 26, 1911 – Jan. 27, 1972) was referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”. She became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world, heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist. She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”. She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers. “I sing God’s music because it makes me feel free,” Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, “It gives me hope. With the blues, when you finish, you still have the blues.”]

9. Martin Luther King Jr. – “MLK – I Have A Dream 1963 (excerpt)”
from: Inspirational Speeches, Vo. 3 / Orange Leisure / May 16, 2011
[American civil rights leader/activist and Baptist minister, born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King’s speeches have been issued on numerous releases – his most well-known and influential address being “I Have a Dream”, which was held during “The March on Washington” in 1963. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.]

10. Marian Anderson – “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
from: He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands / BMG / Orig. 1961 [Reissued 1991]
[Marian Anderson (Feb 27, 1897 – Apr. 8, 1993) was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century. In 1939, the (DAR) refused to let Anderson sing in Constitution Hall. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson became the first black person, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC on Jan. 7, 1955. Anderson worked as a delegate to the UN Human Rights Committee and “goodwill ambassadress” for the U.S. Dept. of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.]

11.Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter & Chorus – “Rocka My Soul”
from: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre “Revelations” / V2 / 1998
[Revelations is the signature choreographic work of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. It was first produced by Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City, New York on January 31, 1960. Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom through a suite of dances set to spirituals and blues music. It’s been performed in over 70 countries in the half century since then and has been described as “the most widely seen modern dance work in the world.” The finale song of the three part “Revelations” is “Rocka My Soul In The Bosom Of Abraham” and it has been described by writer Juliana Lewis-Ferguson as a, “spiritually powerful conclusion to the suite and a purely physical release of emotion.”]

11:42 – Negro Spirituals and Red Clay of Greenwood

12. The Swan Silvertones – “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep”
from: Platinum Gospel: The Swan Silvertones / Sonorous Entertainment / 2012 (1959)
[“Mary Don’t You Weep” (alternately titled “O Mary Don’t You Weep”, “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep, Don’t You Mourn”, or variations thereof) is a Negro spiritual that originates from before the American Civil War – thus it is what scholars call a “slave song,” “a label that describes their origins among the enslaved,” and it contains “coded messages of hope and resistance.” It is one of the most important of Negro spirituals. The song tells the Biblical story of Mary of Bethany and her distraught pleas to Jesus to raise her brother Lazarus from the dead. Other narratives relate to The Exodus and the Passage of the Red Sea, with the chorus proclaiming Pharaoh’s army got drown-ded!, and to God’s rainbow covenant to Noah after the Great Flood. With liberation thus one of its themes, the song again become popular during the Civil Rights Movement. Additionally, a song that explicitly chronicles the victories of the Civil Rights Movement, “If You Miss Me from the Back of the Bus”, written by Charles Neblett of The Freedom Singers, was sung to this tune and became one of the most well-known songs of that movement. In 2015 it was announced that The Swan Silvertones’s version of the song will be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”. The first recording of the song was by the Fisk Jubilee Singers in 1915. The best known recordings were made by the vocal gospel group The Caravans in 1958, with Inez Andrews as the lead singer, and The Swan Silvertones in 1959. “Mary Don’t You Weep” became The Swan Silvertones’ greatest hit, and lead singer Claude Jeter’s interpolation “I’ll be a bridge over deep water if you trust in my name” served as Paul Simon’s inspiration to write his 1970 song “Bridge over Troubled Water”.The spiritual’s lyric God gave Noah the rainbow sign, no more water the fire next time inspired the title for The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s 1963 account of race relations in America.]

13. Krystle Warren – “Red Clay”
from: Three The Hard Way / Parlour Door Music / August 18, 2017
[Produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones. Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections.]

[Krystle Warren & The Faculty play The Hotel Cafe, 1623 N Cahuenga Blvd, Los Angeles, California on Friday, January 17, 2020 at 10:30 PM featuring Krystle Warren, Solomon Dorsey, Cassorla, Jonathan Anderson, and Mike Riddleberger.]

[Krystle Warren & The Faculty play at Rough Trade NYC 64 N 9th St, New York, New York, Friday, January 10, 2020 at 8 PM with Krystle Warren, Solomon Dorsey, Mike Riddleberger, Zach Djanikian, and Jacob Snider will play Faculty melodies new and old. With special guest, Calvin Arsenia.]

10:48 – Freedom.

MLK said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

14. Nina Simone -“I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”
from: Silk and Soul / RCA / 1967
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21, 1933. She died on April 21, 2003. Nina Simone was a singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist who worked in a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born in North Carolina, the sixth child of a preacher, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of the few supporters in her hometown of Tryon, North Carolina, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in NYC. Simone recorded more than 40 albums. “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free” is a gospel/jazz song written by Billy Taylor & “Dick Dallas.”]

15. Solomon Burke – “None Of Us Are Free”
from: Don’t Give Up On Me / Fat Possum / 2002
[Back up singers: The Blind Boys of Alabama. Born James Solomon McDonald, March 21, 1940, Solomon Burke died October 10, 2010. He was an American preacher & singer, who shaped the sound of rhythm & blues as one of the founding fathers of soul music in the 1960s and a “key transitional figure in the development of soul music from rhythm & blues. During the 55 years that he performed professionally, Burke released 38 studio albums on at least 17 record labels and had 35 singles that charted in the US, including 26 singles that made the Billboard R&B charts. In 2001, Burke was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a performer. His album Don’t Give Up on Me won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003. By 2005 Burke was credited with selling 17 million albums.]

16. Nina Simone – “I Shall Be Released”
from: To Love Somebody / RCA / 1967
[1 of 3 Bob Dylan songs Nina Simone performed for this album. Written by Dylan in 1967. The Band recorded the first officially-released version of the song for their 1968 debut album, Music from Big Pink, with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko & Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus. The song was also performed near the end of the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, The Last Waltz, in which all the night’s performers (except of Muddy Waters) plus Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood appeared on the same stage.]

11:02 – Station I.D.

11:02 – The Staple Singers & Bobby Watson and “Unpaid Bills”

MLK said, “In our glorious fight for civil rights, we must guard against being fooled by false slogans, as ‘right-to-work.’ It provides no ‘rights’ and no ‘works.’ Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining… We demand this fraud be stopped.”

17. Pops Staples – “You Gotta Serve Somebody”
from: e-town live volume 3 / e-town / December 18, 2002
[Recorded Sept. 16, 1994, Live in Boulder]
[Originally written by Bob Dylan. Roebuck “Pops” Staples was born on a cotton plantation near Winona, Mississippi, on Dec. 28, 1914, the youngest of 14 children. When growing up he heard, and began to play with, local blues guitarists such as Charlie Patton, who lived on the nearby Dockery Plantation, Robert Johnson, and Son House. He dropped out of school after the eighth grade, and sang with a gospel group before marrying and moving to Chicago in 1935. A “pivotal figure in gospel in the 1960s and 70s,” and an accomplished songwriter, guitarist and singer. Patriarch of The Staple Singers, which included his son Pervis and daughters Mavis, Yvonne, and Cleotha.]

18. Mavis Staples – “Down in Mississippi”
from: Live – Hope At The Hideout / Anti / 2008
[Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Mavis Staples, of The Staple Singers, is a celebrated equal rights activist. She’s performed at inaugural parties for Presidents Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Recorded in June, 2008, in the run up to the Presidential election of Barrack Obama. Recorded live in the intimate bar The Hideout, in her hometown of Chicago. Mavis Staples, marched, sang & protested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.]

19. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: Single / Stax (Fantasy / Ace) / 1967

20. Bobby Watson & The I Have a Dream Project–”Check Cashing Day” [feat. Glenn North]
from: Check Cashing Day / Lafiya Music / Aug. 28, 2013
[From wikipedia.org: “Bobby Watson was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1953. he is an American post-bop jazz alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. Watson now has 27 recordings as a leader. He appears on nearly 100 other recordings as either co-leader or in a supporting role. Watson has recorded more than 100 original compositions. Watson grew up in Bonner Springs and Kansas City, Kansas.]

[Bobby Watson plays The Lied Center in Lawrence, KS, on Friday, March 6, at 7:30 PM.]

[Congratulations to Glenn North for being the newly appointed Executive Director of Bruce R. Watkins Cultural Heritage Center.]

11:20 – Hard Times

21. Kelly Hunt – “Sunshine Long Overdue”
from: Even The Sparrow / Kelly Hunt / 2019
[The daughter of an opera singer and a saxophonist, Kelly Hunt was raised in Memphis, TN, and grew up performing other people’s works through piano lessons, singing in choirs, and performing theater. “It was a very creative, artistic household,” says Hunt. During her teenage years, influenced by musical inspirations as diverse as Norah Jones, Rachmaninov, and John Denver, she began writing her own songs on the piano as a creative outlet. After being introduced to the banjo in college while studying French and visual arts, Hunt began to develop her own improvised style of playing, combining old-time picking styles with the percussive origins of the instrument. “I’m self-taught, I just started letting the songs dictate what needed to be there,” she says. “I heard a rhythm in a song that I wanted to execute, so I figured out how to do it on the drum head while still being able to articulate certain notes in one motion.” After college, Hunt followed a rambling path that took her through careers in acting, graphic design, traditional French bread making, and medicine, all the while making music as a private endeavor. “I wanted to get serious about a responsible career choice, but music kept bubbling up. I was writing a lot and playing a lot and started to not be satisfied just playing to my walls of my room.” After moving to Kansas City and discovering her mysterious Depression-era tenor banjo, Hunt began recording Even The Sparrow in Kansas City alongside collaborator Stas’ Heaney and engineer Kelly Werts. “It took almost two years to record,” she says, “learning how to let the songs dictate the production.” Having finally come to light, the album displays Hunt’s penchant for masterful storytelling and intriguing arrangement, as researched and complex as they are memorable, punctuated by her articulate melodies and a well-enunciated and creative command of lyrical delivery infused with deft emotional communication. While reminiscent of modern traditionalists such as Gillian Welch–a number of her songs even borrow titles and phrasing from traditional American music (“Back to Dixie,” “Gloryland”)–Even The Sparrow reveals an ineffable quality that hovers beyond the constraints of genre, à la Anais Mitchell and Patty Griffin. In “The Men of Blue & Grey,” what begins as a Reconstruction-era ballad about the repurposing of Civil War glass plate negatives in a greenhouse roof soon becomes a meditation on the hope that growth and life may one day be able to emerge from the ruins of suffering and haunting of violence. “Across The Great Divide” turns an otherwise traditional accounting of spurned love into a philosophical epic of the ethics of forgiveness and freedom, evoking the ideas of Søren Kierkegaard and Walt Whitman.]

[Kelly Hunt plays Jayhawk Theatre, 720 SW Jackson St, Topeka, KS, Saturday, January 18 at 7:OO PM.]

[Kelly Hunt has been nominated for 2019 Album of the Year by Folk Alliance International International Folk Music Awards. Even The Sparrow was in the Top Ten of WMM’s 119 Best Recordings of 2019.]

22. Laura Love – “Hard Times”
from: You Ain’t Got No Easter Clothes / Koch / 2004
[Laura Love is an American singer-songwriter and bass guitar player. Her style has been described as “Afro-Celtic” and has also been influenced by bluegrass. Love was born Laura Jones in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1960. She is African American, Native American, and Caucasian. Love had a difficult childhood, raised by a mother with schizophrenia and in foster homes. Her father, who had little involvement in her life, was the jazz musician Preston Love who played the saxophone with Count Basie, Lucky Millinder and Johnny Otis and formed his own band in the 1950s. Love’s mother, Wini, had been a singer in Preston’s jazz band. Love began her performing career at age 16, singing for the prisoners at the Nebraska State Penitentiary. Love relocated to Seattle, Washington, where she was a member of the 1980s rock group Boom Boom G.I. She was also a member of an all-female band, Venus Envy. After Love released three albums on her own label, Octoroon Biography, Putumayo released a collection of her songs in 1995. Her 2003 album Welcome to Pagan Place included the controversial song “I Want You Gone”, about George W. Bush. In 2004 she published an autobiography, You Ain’t Got No Easter Clothes, with an accompanying album of the same name.][“Hard Times Come Again No More” (sometimes, “Hard Times”) is an American parlor song written by Stephen Foster. It was published in New York by Firth, Pond & Co. in 1854 as Foster’s Melodies No. 28. Well-known and popular in its day, both in America and Europe, the song asks the fortunate to consider the plight of the less fortunate and ends with one of Foster’s favorite images: “a pale drooping maiden”. The first audio recording was a wax cylinder by the Edison Manufacturing Company (Edison Gold Moulded 9120) in 1905. It has been recorded and performed numerous times since. The song is Roud Folk Song Index #2659.]

11:28 – Underwriting

11:30 – Brothers

23. Isley Brothers – “Brother, Brother, Brother”
from: Brotherhood / Hear Music / 2006
[The Isley Brothers are an American musical group originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, that started as a vocal trio consisting of brothers O’Kelly Isley Jr., Rudolph Isley and Ronald Isley. The group has been cited as having enjoyed one of the “longest, most influential, and most diverse careers in the pantheon of popular music”. Together with a fourth brother, Vernon, the group performed gospel music until Vernon’s death a few years after its formation. After moving to the New York City area in the late 1950s, the group had modest chart successes during their early years, first coming to prominence in 1959 with their fourth single, “Shout”, written by the three brothers. Initially a modest charted single, the song eventually sold over a million copies. Afterwards the group recorded for a variety of labels, including the top 20 single, “Twist and Shout” and the Motown single “This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak for You)”, before recording and issuing the Grammy Award-winning hit “It’s Your Thing” on their own label, T-Neck Records. Influenced by gospel and doo-wop music, the group began experimenting with different musical styles incorporating elements of rock and funk as well as pop balladry. The inclusion of younger brothers Ernie Isley (lead guitar, drums) and Marvin Isley (bass guitar), and Rudolph’s brother-in-law Chris Jasper (keyboards, synthesizers), in 1973 turned the original vocal trio into a complete band. For the next full decade, they recorded top-selling albums including The Heat Is On and Between the Sheets. The six-member band splintered in 1983, with Ernie, Marvin, and Chris Jasper forming the short-lived spinoff group Isley-Jasper-Isley. The oldest member, O’Kelly, died in 1986 and Rudolph and Ronald released a pair of albums as a duo before Rudolph retired to a life in the Christian ministry in 1989. Ronald reconvened the group two years later in 1991 with Ernie and Marvin; five years later, in 1996, Marvin Isley left the group due to complications of diabetes. The remaining duo of Ronald and Ernie achieved mainstream success with the albums Mission to Please (1996), Eternal (2001) and Body Kiss (2003). Eternal spawned the top twenty hit “Contagious”. As of 2019, the Isley Brothers continue to perform under the lineup of Ronald & Ernie. The Isley Brothers have had four Top 10 singles on the U.S. Billboard chart. Sixteen of their albums charted in the Top 40. 13 of those albums have been certified gold, platinum or multi-platinum by the RIAA. The brothers have been honored by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which inducted them in 1992. 5 years later, they were added to Hollywood’s Rockwalk, and in 2003 they were inducted to the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. They received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014.]

24. The Holmes Brothers – “Promised Land”
from: Promised Land / Rounder / 1997
[The Holmes Brothers were an American musical trio originally from Christchurch, Virginia. Mixing sounds from blues, soul, gospel, country, and rhythm & blues, they have released twelve studio albums, with three reaching the top 5 on the Billboard Blues Albums Chart. They have gained a following by playing regularly at summer folk, blues, gospel, and jazz festivals. They have recorded with Van Morrison, Peter Gabriel, Odetta, Phoebe Snow, Willie Nelson, Freddie Roulette, Rosanne Cash, Levon Helm and Joan Osborne, and have gigged all over the world—including performing for President Bill Clinton. They won the Blues Music Award from the Memphis-based Blues Foundation for Band of the Year in 2005 and for the Soul Blues Album of the Year in 2008. USA Today calls The Holmes Brothers’ music “Rootsy R&B, gospel and country. They are glorious, full of soul and surprises.” The New Yorker says, “The Holmes Brothers are capable of awesome achievements.”NPR adds, “Their voices are rough enough for a juke joint and smooth enough for church.]

25. The Chambers Brothers – “People Get Ready”
from: The Time Has Come / Columbia / 1967 [written by Curtis Mayfield]
[American psychedelic soul band, known for their 11-minute 1968 hit “Time Has Come Today”. The group was part of the wave of new music that integrated American blues and gospel traditions with modern psychedelic and rock elements. Their music has been kept alive through heavy use in film soundtracks. Originally from Carthage, Mississippi, the Chambers Brothers first honed their skills as members of the choir in their Baptist church. This set up ended in 1952 when the eldest brother George was drafted into the Army. George relocated to Los Angeles after his discharge, and his brothers soon settled there as well. As a foursome, they began performing gospel and folk throughout the Southern California region in 1954, but they more or less remained unknown until appearing in NYC in 1965. Consisting of George (September 26, 1931 – October 12, 2019) on washtub bass (later on Danelectro bass guitar), Lester (b. April 13, 1940) on harmonica, and Willie (b. March 3, 1938) and Joe (b. August 22, 1942) on guitar, the group started to venture outside the gospel circuit, playing at coffeehouses that booked folk acts. They played at places like The Ash Grove, a very popular Los Angeles folk club. It became one of their favorite haunts and brought them into contact with Hoyt Axton, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Reverend Gary Davis, and Barbara Dane. Dane became a great supporter, performing and recording with the brothers. With the addition of Brian Keenan (January 28, 1943 – October 5, 1985) on drums, Dane took them on tour with her and introduced them to Pete Seeger, who helped put the Chambers Brothers on the bill of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. One of the songs they performed, “I Got It”, appeared on the Newport Folk Festival 1965 compilation LP, which was issued on the Vanguard label. They were becoming more accepted in the folk community, but, like many on the folk circuit, were looking to electrify their music and develop a more rock & roll sound. Joe Chambers recalled in a May 1994 Goldmine article that people at the Newport Folk Festival were breaking down fences and rushing to the stage. “Newport had never seen or heard anything like that.” After the group finished and the crowd finally settled down, the MC came up and said “Whether you know it or not, that was rock ‘n’ roll.” That night they played at a post-concert party for festival performers and went to a recording session of the newly electrified Bob Dylan. Shortly after appearing at Newport, the group released its debut album, People Get Ready.]

11:45:43 – Gospel & Folk Music Carried the Message.

The closing set starts with the late Pete Seeger singing a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley he adapted and made famous, followed by Sarah Lee Guthrie, the granddaughter of Woody Guthrie, with Johnny Irion, singing a song called “Dr. King” written by Pete Seeger. We end with a song written by Woody Guthrie performed by the great Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings. Call it from Folk to Funky.

Keep The Dream Alive! We Shall Overcome!

26. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

27. Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion – “Dr. King”
from: exploration / New West / 2005 [written by Pete Seeger]
[Sarah Lee Guthrie was born February 17, 1979 and Johnny Irion was born February 3, 1969. They are a musical duo. Guthrie and Irion were married on October 16, 1999 and began performing together as an acoustic duo in the fall of 2000. Their music combined Irion’s love of rock and blues with Guthrie’s roots of folk and country. Guthrie is the youngest daughter of folksinger Arlo Guthrie and the granddaughter of Woody Guthrie. As a third generation singer/songwriter Guthrie released her first self-titled album on the family owned and operated Rising Son Records in 2002. As a child she was involved in theater and dance. Her interest in music was sparked when she worked as her father’s road manager on the 1997 Further Festival tour and saw other members of the tour group having fun at late-night hootenannies. She picked up an acoustic guitar and started playing as a way to join in on the fun. “I always wrote poems, so it wasn’t that far off for me to turn that into songs.” “My dad was absolutely thrilled, of course, and would teach me stuff every day when we were on the road together. That was a really cool way to get to know my dad, because I’d never known him that way. And that’s another thing that made it easy: my dad was so supportive.” Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion performing live for Valentine’s Day 2008 at Tales From The Tavern at The Maverick Saloon in Santa Ynez, CA. Irion originates from a family of artists. His uncle is author Thomas Steinbeck, his great uncle is author John Steinbeck, and his grandmother, Rubilee Knight, is a classical violinist. His late grandfather, Fred Knight, sang tenor in numerous venues. Irion and Guthrie met through a mutual friend (Chris Robinson of the Black Crowes) while the two were working together in Los Angeles. In 1999 Guthrie and Irion joined guitarist Tao Rodríguez-Seeger, grandson of Pete Seeger, and performed as a trio under the name RIG.]

28. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – “This Land is Your Land”
from: Naturally / Daptone / 2005
[written by Woody Guthrie, Sarah Lee’s Grandfather.]
[In November 2016, Sharon Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 United States presidential election results and another the following day. Jones remained alert and lucid during the initial period of her hospital stay, jokingly claiming that the news of Donald Trump’s victory was responsible for her stroke. She died on November 18, 2016, in Cooperstown, New York, aged 60. Sharon Lafaye Jones was born May 4, 1956 and died this year on November 18, 2016. She was an American soul and funk singer. Although she collaborated with Lou Reed, David Byrne and others, she is best known as lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old. In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy, in the category Best R&B Album, for Give the People What They Want. Jones was born in Augusta, Georgia, the daughter of Ella Mae Price Jones and Charlie Jones, living in adjacent North Augusta, South Carolina. Jones was the youngest of six children; her siblings are Dora, Charles, Ike, Willa and Henry. Jones’s mother raised her deceased sister’s four children as well as her own. She moved the family to New York City when Sharon was a young child. As children, she and her brothers would often imitate the singing and dancing of James Brown. Her mother happened to know Brown, who was also from Augusta.Jones grew up in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, she graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. She attended Brooklyn College. A regular gospel singer in church, Jones often entered talent shows backed by local funk bands in the early 1970s. Session work then continued with backing vocals, often credited to Lafaye Jones, but in the absence of any recording contract as a solo singer, she spent many years working as a corrections officer at Rikers Island and as an armored car guard for Wells Fargo, until receiving a mid-life career break in 1996 after she appeared on a session backing the soul and deep funk legend Lee Fields. Sharon Jones was part of the very beginning of Daptone Records Daptone Records’ first release was a full-length album by Sharon Jones. A new band, the Dap-Kings, was formed from the former members of the Soul Providers and the Mighty Imperials. Some of the musicians went on to record for Lehman’s Soul Fire label, while some formed the Budos Band, an Afro-beat band. From the original Soul Providers, Roth (also known as Bosco Mann) on bass, guitarist and emcee Binky Griptite, percussionist Fernando Velez, trumpet player Anda Szilagyi and organist Earl Maxton were joined by original Mighty Imperials saxophonist Leon Michels and drummer Homer Steinweiss, plus Neal Sugarman from Sugarman 3, to form The Dap-Kings. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, the released the album Dap Dippin’ with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in May of 2002, , for which they received immediate attention and acclaim from enthusiasts, DJs and collectors. Next they released, Naturally (2005), 100 Days, 100 Nights (2007) and I Learned the Hard Way (2010). They are seen by many as the spearhead of a revival of soul and funk.]

29. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

Next week, on January 22 we talk with Hadiza., Les Ismore, and Scott Hobart, plus we have a whole lot of NeW & MidCoastal Releases from Pedaljets, Una Walkenhorst, and more!

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #820

WMM Celebrates MLK

Wednesday MidDay Medley
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

“Remembering MLK”

WMM celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born January 15, 1929. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King’s efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. By the time of his death, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War, both from a religious perspective. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 1981.

Mark plays music of the movement from: Mavis Staples, Pops Staples, The Staple Singers, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project featuring Glenn North, Krystle Warren, Kelly Hunt, Laura Love, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Labelle, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Soweto Gospel Choir, International Noise Conspiracy, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, The Holmes Brothers, The Chambers Brothers, The Isley Brothers, Pete Seeger, and Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion.

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #820

WMM Playlist from Jan. 16, 2019

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

“Remembering MLK”

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / Universal / Dec. 20, 1979
[WMM’s theme]

2. Soweto Gospel Choir – “Pride (In The Name of Love)”
from: In the Name of Love – Africa Celebrates U2 / Shout! Factory Records / 2008
[Formed in Soweto, South Africa, by David Mulovhedzi & Beverly Bryer, two choir directors. The 30-member ensemble blends African gospel, Negro spirituals, reggae and American popular music. The group performed at the first of the 46664 concerts for Nelson Mandela and has toured internationally. Their albums Blessed and African Spirit won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2007 and 2008.]

3. International Noise Conspiracy / MLK Jr. – “The First Conspiracy / Let Freedom Ring”
from: Adbusters – Live Without Dead Time / Adbusters / 2003
[The (International) Noise Conspiracy (abbreviated T(I)NC) were a Swedish rock band formed in Sweden in the late months of 1998. The line-up consists of Dennis Lyxzén (vocals), Inge Johansson (bass), Lars Strömberg (guitar), and Ludwig Dahlberg (drums). The band is known for its punk and garage rock musical influences, and its impassioned left-wing political stance. Influenced by a quote from 1960’s folk singer Phil Ochs, according to lead singer Lyxzén, the band wanted to achieve an ideal blend of music and politics that was, “a cross between Elvis Presley and Che Guevara.”]

4. Labelle – “Something in The Air / The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”
from: Something Silver / Warner Archives / 1997 [orig. Pressure Cookin’ / 1973, 3rd album from the funk/soul trio of: Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx and Sarah Dash who each shared a rap on “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. It was the B-side to Scott-Heron’s first single, “Home Is Where the Hatred Is”, from his album Pieces of a Man (1971). “Something in the Air” is a song orig. recorded by Thunderclap Newman, a band created by Pete Townshend for The Who’s former roadie John ‘Speedy’ Keen who wrote and sang the song. It was a UK #1 single for three weeks in July 1969.]

10:10

Thanks for tuning into Wednesday MidDay Medley, today we celebrate the life of human rights icon, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born Jan. 15, 1929.

MLK led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, was a cofounder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, and served as it’s first president. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his, “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination thru civil disobedience and non-violent means.

By the time of his death in 1968, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War. King was assassinated, April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I. [B-day – Mon 15] [MLK Day – Mon. Jan. 15.]

As Pete Seeger wrote: “Songs gave them the courage to believe they would not fail.” Today we feature music of and inspired by the civil rights movement from: Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project (featuring Glenn North), Krystle Warren, Bob & Una Walkenhorst, Kelly Hunt, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, Pops Staples, Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, Pete Seeger, Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion. We started w/: Soweto Gospel Choir, The Intl. Noise Conspiracy, and Labelle.

And at 11:15, Kansas City based musicians Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst join us to share details about Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wednesday, January 16th, from 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand.

10:14 – Soul Brother…

MLK said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

MLK said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

5. Curtis Mayfield – “Beautiful Brother of Mine”
from: Roots / Curtom-Buddah / October, 1971 [2nd solo release from Curtis Mayfield, born in Chicago, June 3, 1942. One of the most influential musicians behind soul & politically conscious African-American music. Mayfield started his musical career in a gospel choir. Moving to the North Side of Chicago he met Jerry Butler in 1956 at the age of 14, and joined vocal group The Impressions. As a songwriter, Mayfield became noted as one of the first musicians to bring more prevalent themes of social awareness into soul music. In 1965, he wrote “People Get Ready” for The Impressions, which displayed his more politically charged songwriting. After leaving The Impressions in 1970, Mayfield released several albums, including the soundtrack for the blaxploitation film Super Fly in 1972. The soundtrack was noted for its socially conscious themes, mostly addressing problems surrounding inner city minorities such as crime, poverty and drug abuse. Mayfield was paralyzed from the neck down after lighting equipment fell on him during a live performance at Wingate Field in Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York, on August 13, 1990. Despite this, he continued his career as a recording artist, releasing his final album, New World Order, in 1996. Mayfield won a Grammy Legend Award in 1994 and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995, and was a double inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a member of the Impressions in 1991, and again in 1999 as a solo artist. He was also a 2-time Grammy Hall of Fame inductee. He died from complications of type 2 diabetes, Dec 26, 1999, at 57.]

6. Maceo & The Macks – “Soul Power ’74”
from: James Brown’s Funky People, Pt. 2 / People Records / 1988
[This record is sampled more than crackers and chees at Costco, it contains samples itself in the form of tape overlays of civil rights rallies, a Dr. King speech, and an announcement of King’s assassination. Maceo Parker played saxophone with James Brown, Parliment, Funkadelic, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and Prince.]

7. Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Lamar Campbell & Spirit of Praise – “Ella’s Song”
from: Soundtrack to Boycott / HBO / 2001 [Critically acclaimed 2001 film staring Jeffrey Wright as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Terrence Howard as Ralph Abernathy, and CCH Pounder as Jo Ann Robinson.]

10:28 – Underwriting

10:30 – King’s Life, Death, and Spirit…

MLK said, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

8. Mahalia Jackson – “How I Got Over”
from: The Original Apollo Sessions / Couch & Madison Partners / May 25, 2013
[Gospel hymn composed & published in 1951 by Clara Ward (1924-1973). It was performed by Mahalia Jackson at the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 before 250,000 people. Mahalia Jackson (Oct. 26, 1911 – Jan. 27, 1972) was referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”. She became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world, heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist. She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”. She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers. “I sing God’s music because it makes me feel free,” Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, “It gives me hope. With the blues, when you finish, you still have the blues.”]

9. Martin Luther King Jr. – “MLK – I Have A Dream 1963 (excerpt)”
from: Inspirational Speeches, Vo. 3 / Orange Leisure / May 16, 2011 [American civil rights leader/activist and Baptist minister, born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King’s speeches have been issued on numerous releases – his most well-known and influential address being “I Have a Dream”, which was held during “The March on Washington” in 1963. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.]

10. Marian Anderson – “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
from: He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands / BMG / Orig. 1961 [Reissued 1991]
[Marian Anderson (Feb 27, 1897 – Apr. 8, 1993) was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century. In 1939, the (DAR) refused to let Anderson sing in Constitution Hall. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson became the first black person, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC on Jan. 7, 1955. Anderson worked as a delegate to the UN Human Rights Committee and “goodwill ambassadress” for the U.S. Dept. of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991.]

11. Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter & Chorus -“Rocka My Soul”
from: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre “Revelations” / V2 / 1998
[Revelations is the signature choreographic work of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. It was first produced by Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City, New York on January 31, 1960. Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom through a suite of dances set to spirituals and blues music. It’s been performed in over 70 countries in the half century since then and has been described as “the most widely seen modern dance work in the world.” The finale song of the three part “Revelations” is “Rocka My Soul In The Bosom Of Abraham” and it has been described by writer Juliana Lewis-Ferguson as a, “spiritually powerful conclusion to the suite and a purely physical release of emotion.”]

10:41

12. The Swan Silvertones – “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep”
from: Platinum Gospel: The Swan Silvertones / Sonorous Entertainment / 2012 (1959)
[“Mary Don’t You Weep” (alternately titled “O Mary Don’t You Weep”, “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep, Don’t You Mourn”, or variations thereof) is a Negro spiritual that originates from before the American Civil War – thus it is what scholars call a “slave song,” “a label that describes their origins among the enslaved,” and it contains “coded messages of hope and resistance.” It is one of the most important of Negro spirituals. The song tells the Biblical story of Mary of Bethany and her distraught pleas to Jesus to raise her brother Lazarus from the dead. Other narratives relate to The Exodus and the Passage of the Red Sea, with the chorus proclaiming Pharaoh’s army got drown-ded!, and to God’s rainbow covenant to Noah after the Great Flood. With liberation thus one of its themes, the song again become popular during the Civil Rights Movement. Additionally, a song that explicitly chronicles the victories of the Civil Rights Movement, “If You Miss Me from the Back of the Bus”, written by Charles Neblett of The Freedom Singers, was sung to this tune and became one of the most well-known songs of that movement. In 2015 it was announced that The Swan Silvertones’s version of the song will be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”. The first recording of the song was by the Fisk Jubilee Singers in 1915. The best known recordings were made by the vocal gospel group The Caravans in 1958, with Inez Andrews as the lead singer, and The Swan Silvertones in 1959. “Mary Don’t You Weep” became The Swan Silvertones’ greatest hit, and lead singer Claude Jeter’s interpolation “I’ll be a bridge over deep water if you trust in my name” served as Paul Simon’s inspiration to write his 1970 song “Bridge over Troubled Water”.The spiritual’s lyric God gave Noah the rainbow sign, no more water the fire next time inspired the title for The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s 1963 account of race relations in America.]

13. Krystle Warren – “Red Clay”
from: Three The Hard Way / Parlour Door Music / August 18, 2017
[Produced by Krystle Warren and Ben Kane (D’Angelo, Emily King, PJ Morton). Recorded, engineered, and mixed by Ben Kane. Written & performed by Krystle Warren. Mixed at The Garden, Brooklyn. Mastered & cut by Alex DeTurk at Masterdisk. Last year in Krystle Warren premiered this song and her other new songs from this album at the Middle of the Map Fest in a packed room at Californos in Westport and later at The Polsky Theatre for the Performing Arts Series of Johnsons County Community College. For this record Krystle decided to play every instrument and vocals & back up vocals, “playing bass, drums, lap steel, piano, guitar, and vocals directly to analog tape. She and Ben Kane recorded in Villetaneuse, France, a small town on the outskirts of Paris in a vintage 70s era studio that offered just the right, rich sound to suggest the musical foundation for the record, and to do justice to the duo’s carefully balanced arrangements.” On the radio show last year Krystle shared inspirations for this record, early gospel recordings, that crossed over into Jazz from Pharoah Sanders, Edwin Hawkins, and The Swan Silvertones. Originally from KC, Krystle learned to play the guitar by listening to Rubber Soul & Revolver from The Beatles. Krystle graduated from Paseo Arts Academy in 2001 and began her musical career in collaborating with area jazz and pop musicians. After living in San Francisco and NYC, Krystle was signed to a French label, Because Music, and moved to Paris to release “Circles” in 2009. Krystle played French and British television programs, including Later with Jools Holland, garnering critical acclaim and traveling all over the world with Rufus Wainwright, Nick Cave, Norah Jones, and Joan As Police Woman. Krystle created, Parlour Door Music, to release “Love Songs: A Time You May Embrace” a recording from a 13-day session in Brooklyn, where she recorded 24 songs live with 28 musicians including her band, The Faculty, alongside choirs, horn and string sections.] [Krystle Warren was on WMM on September 20. We played her music on 12 different shows.]

10:48 – Freedom…

MLK said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

14. Nina Simone -“I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”
from: Silk and Soul / RCA / 1967
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21, 1933. She died on April 21, 2003. Nina Simone was a singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist who worked in a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born in North Carolina, the sixth child of a preacher, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of the few supporters in her hometown of Tryon, North Carolina, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in NYC. Simone recorded more than 40 albums. “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free” is a gospel/jazz song written by Billy Taylor & “Dick Dallas.”]

15. Solomon Burke – “None Of Us Are Free”
from: Don’t Give Up On Me / Fat Possum / 2002
[Back up singers: The Blind Boys of Alabama. Born James Solomon McDonald, March 21, 1940, Solomon Burke died October 10, 2010. He was an American preacher & singer, who shaped the sound of rhythm & blues as one of the founding fathers of soul music in the 1960s and a “key transitional figure in the development of soul music from rhythm & blues. During the 55 years that he performed professionally, Burke released 38 studio albums on at least 17 record labels and had 35 singles that charted in the US, including 26 singles that made the Billboard R&B charts. In 2001, Burke was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a performer. His album Don’t Give Up on Me won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003. By 2005 Burke was credited with selling 17 million albums.]

16. Nina Simone – “I Shall Be Released”
from: To Love Somebody / RCA / 1967
[1 of 3 Bob Dylan songs Nina Simone performed for this album. Written by Dylan in 1967. The Band recorded the first officially-released version of the song for their 1968 debut album, Music from Big Pink, with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko & Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus. The song was also performed near the end of the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, The Last Waltz, in which all the night’s performers (except of Muddy Waters) plus Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood appeared on the same stage.]

11:02 – Station I.D.

11:02 – The Staple Singers & Bobby Watson and “Unpaid Bills”

MLK said, “In our glorious fight for civil rights, we must guard against being fooled by false slogans, as ‘right-to-work.’ It provides no ‘rights’ and no ‘works.’ Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining… We demand this fraud be stopped.”

17. Pops Staples – “You Gotta Serve Somebody”
from: e-town live volume 3 / e-town / December 18, 2002 \[Recorded Sept. 16, 1994, Live in Boulder][Originally written by Bob Dylan. Roebuck “Pops” Staples was born on a cotton plantation near Winona, Mississippi, on Dec. 28, 1914, the youngest of 14 children. When growing up he heard, and began to play with, local blues guitarists such as Charlie Patton, who lived on the nearby Dockery Plantation, Robert Johnson, and Son House. He dropped out of school after the eighth grade, and sang with a gospel group before marrying and moving to Chicago in 1935. A “pivotal figure in gospel in the 1960s and 70s,” and an accomplished songwriter, guitarist and singer. Patriarch of The Staple Singers, which included his son Pervis and daughters Mavis, Yvonne, and Cleotha.]

18. Mavis Staples – “Down in Mississippi”
from: Live – Hope At The Hideout / Anti / 2008
[Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Mavis Staples, of The Staple Singers, is a celebrated equal rights activist. She’s performed at inaugural parties for Presidents Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Recorded in June, 2008, in the run up to the Presidential election of Barrack Obama. Recorded live in the intimate bar The Hideout, in her hometown of Chicago. Mavis Staples, marched, sang & protested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.]

19. The Staple Singers – “When Will We Be Paid”
from: Single / Stax (Fantasy / Ace) / 1967

20. Bobby Watson & The I Have a Dream Project–”Check Cashing Day” [feat. Glenn North]
from: Check Cashing Day / Lafiya Music / Digital – Aug. 28, 2013 / Physical – Nov. 12, 2013
[From wikipedia.org: “Bobby Watson was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1953. he is an American post-bop jazz alto saxophonist, composer, producer, and educator. Watson now has 27 recordings as a leader. He appears on nearly 100 other recordings as either co-leader or in a supporting role. Watson has recorded more than 100 original compositions. Watson grew up in Bonner Springs and Kansas City, Kansas.]

21. Kelly Hunt – “Sunshine Long Overdue”
from: Even The Sparrow / Kelly Hunt / 2019

11:23 – Interview with Kelly Hunt & Una Walkenhorst

Kansas City based musicians Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst join us to share details about Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wed, January 16th, from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand.

Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst, thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wed, January 16th, from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand.

The series continues with Scott Hrabko on March 6, Mikal Shapiro on April 11, and Sara Morgan on May 22.

The performances will also feature Kelly’s longtime co-conspirator multi-instrumentalist Stas’ Heaney and an occasional rotating band of local musicians.

The format may vary some but will include an opening set by each evening’s guest artist songwriter ending with a multi-song collaboration with Kelly followed by a long set of Hunt’s own music freely explored and configured as she sees fit. The residency is intended as an exercise in principles Hunt says guide her creative approach.

“When the opportunity for a residency at The recordBar came up, I knew I wanted to do something different with it. Lately, I’ve been gravitating towards new instruments, new styles of writing, arranging and performing. I’ve been craving a public stage that facilitates experimentation, collaboration and community. A place to air out brand new—even unfinished—songs within the context of live performance: a laboratory of sorts. This series is designed to encourage that kind of creative space for both performer and listener—to give the songwriter a unique sounding board for new ideas, and to invite the listener to participate in that creative process. Every show in this series will be unique. I’m excited to be joined by some of my favorite local songwriters and musicians onstage, and to finally give voice to songs and ideas that have been waiting in the wings for a long time,” said Hunt.

Information at: http://www.therecordbar.com.

Hunt’s stellar debut album, “Even The Sparrow,” is already getting rave advance reaction prior to it’s international release projected for the end of Q1 2019.

“Hunt applies her haunting voice and evocative banjo playing to songs that build on the work of contemporary masters like Gillian Welch.”
– THE KANSAS CITY STAR.

“…the combination of Hunt’s exceptional voice and exquisitely spare instrumentation is stunning.”
– Bill Brownlee THERE STANDS THE GLASS.

Una Walkenhorst shows:

Songwriters Showcase at Records with Merritt
Friday, January 25, at 7:00 PM – Records with Merritt, 1614 Westport Rd, KCMO
Una Walkenhorst, Teri Quinn, Joel Stratton, Nina Lee Cherry

Survivors Stories (A MOCSA Benefit)
FEBRUARY 28, 2019, with support from Fine Dining Productions and the Johnson County Mental Health Center, The Rino will be hosting a very special event benefiting MOCSA. the Metropolitan Organization to Counteract Sexual Assualt. The evening will consist of a curated lineup of performers offering songs, poetry, and other performance art pieces that touch on their experience with sexual assault. The goals for this event are to provide a safe space where survivors can heal, connect, and be given access to the services they may need, and to raise funds and awareness for the important work MOCSA is doing in our community. The event will also provide a chance for those who have not dealt with sexual assault, violence, or harassment to further understand what it means to be a survivor. SEEKING SUBMISSIONS – DEADLINE JANUARY 31, 2019

Bob & Una Walkenhorst Live At The Westsider
Friday, February 1, at 7:00 PM – Mike Kelly’s Westsider. KCMO

Bob & Una Walkenhorst with Brewer & Shipley
Saturday, February 9, at 8:00 PM – Liberty Hall, Lawrence, KS

Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst, thanks for being with us on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Kelly Hunt’s new unique four-part performance residency titled “The SongCraft Sessions“ that starts tonight, Wednesday, January 16th, from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm at recordBar 1520 Grand. More infomation at: http://www.therecordbar.com.

11:39

22. Bob & Una Walkenhorst – “Get On The Bus”
from: For Tomorrow / BAT Records / October 12, 2018
[25 year old Una Walkenhorst is a singer/songwriter from KC. Following the release of her debut album “Scars” in 2014, Una immediately had “new fans. . . coming out of the proverbial woodwork” (AXS). Paired with refreshingly raw vocals, Una’s heartfelt lyrics “will stop you in your tracks (at once beautiful and chilling),” wrote Gilded Palace Radio, as she weaves stories of genuine human experience. Una told KCUR FM that her father was one of the people who made her love music. But having a famous father can be challenging: “I knew that if I started my music career here I would have a lot of opportunities, but not all of them would be because of my music. They would be because I am someone’s daughter,” Walkenhorst says. Loading up her 97 Honda Civic, Una then spent a year traveling across North America promoting her music and connecting with listeners one-on-one. She ended up living in New Orleans. Una Walkenhorst is the youngest daughter of Bob Walkenhorst, a founding member of The Rainmakers, which had national and international hits in the 1980s and 90s, and continue to this day touring and recording new music. In January of 2018 Una Walkenhorst returned home to Kansas City from New Orleans. Over the past several years, Una and Bob had performed together at selected events, including Folk Alliance International. This year the father and daughter duo decided to record an album together, where they split the difference, taking turns as songwriters for the album’s songs, written individually, and recorded together, in clear beautiful harmonies, with that extra special shared musical DNA, that can be heard in the harmonies of The Carter Family, Madisen Ward and the Mama Bear, or Shy Boys.]

11:40 – Underwriting

11:45 – Gospel & Folk Music Carried the Message…

23. Pete Seeger – “We Shall Overcome”
from: The Essential Pete Seeger / Columbia – Legacy / 2004
[Derived from a gospel song by Reverend Charles Tindley called “We Will Overcome” written in 1901. Adapted and made famous by Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, and others the song became central to the civil rights movement of the 1950 and 1960s and eventually used all around the world. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made use of “we shall overcome” in the final Sunday March 31, 1968 speech before his assassination.]

24. Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion – “Dr. King”
from: exploration / New West / 2005 [written by Pete Seeger]

25. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – “This Land is Your Land”
from: Naturally / Daptone / 2005
[written by Woody Guthrie, Sarah Lee’s Grandfather.] [In November 2016, Sharon Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 United States presidential election results and another the following day. Jones remained alert and lucid during the initial period of her hospital stay, jokingly claiming that the news of Donald Trump’s victory was responsible for her stroke. She died on November 18, 2016, in Cooperstown, New York, aged 60. Sharon Lafaye Jones was born May 4, 1956 and died this year on November 18, 2016. She was an American soul and funk singer. Although she collaborated with Lou Reed, David Byrne and others, she is best known as lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old. In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy, in the category Best R&B Album, for Give the People What They Want. Jones was born in Augusta, Georgia, the daughter of Ella Mae Price Jones and Charlie Jones, living in adjacent North Augusta, South Carolina. Jones was the youngest of six children; her siblings are Dora, Charles, Ike, Willa and Henry. Jones’s mother raised her deceased sister’s four children as well as her own. She moved the family to New York City when Sharon was a young child. As children, she and her brothers would often imitate the singing and dancing of James Brown. Her mother happened to know Brown, who was also from Augusta.Jones grew up in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, she graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. She attended Brooklyn College. A regular gospel singer in church, Jones often entered talent shows backed by local funk bands in the early 1970s. Session work then continued with backing vocals, often credited to Lafaye Jones, but in the absence of any recording contract as a solo singer, she spent many years working as a corrections officer at Rikers Island and as an armored car guard for Wells Fargo, until receiving a mid-life career break in 1996 after she appeared on a session backing the soul and deep funk legend Lee Fields. Sharon Jones was part of the very beginning of Daptone Records Daptone Records’ first release was a full-length album by Sharon Jones. A new band, the Dap-Kings, was formed from the former members of the Soul Providers and the Mighty Imperials. Some of the musicians went on to record for Lehman’s Soul Fire label, while some formed the Budos Band, an Afro-beat band. From the original Soul Providers, Roth (also known as Bosco Mann) on bass, guitarist and emcee Binky Griptite, percussionist Fernando Velez, trumpet player Anda Szilagyi and organist Earl Maxton were joined by original Mighty Imperials saxophonist Leon Michels and drummer Homer Steinweiss, plus Neal Sugarman from Sugarman 3, to form The Dap-Kings. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, the released the album Dap Dippin’ with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in May of 2002, , for which they received immediate attention and acclaim from enthusiasts, DJs and collectors. Next they released, Naturally (2005), 100 Days, 100 Nights (2007) and I Learned the Hard Way (2010). They are seen by many as the spearhead of a revival of soul and funk.]

26. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]

Next Week on Wednesday, January 23 we talk with Logan Glasgow of the band Verbose and Eric Kleiner of the band Headlight Rivals who both play The MidCoast Takeover Fundraiser #1 Friday, January 25, at recordBar, ALSO Chloe Jacobson joins us live in our 90.1 FM Studios, PLUS, Ryan Jamaal Davis AKA Kadesh Flow joins us to share new music.

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

Show #769

Wednesday MidDay Medley Remembers MLK

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

“Remembering MLK”

Wednesday MidDay Medley celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born January 15, 1929. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King’s efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. By the time of his death, Dr. King had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and opposing the Vietnam War, both from a religious perspective. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. national holiday in 198I.

Mark plays music of the movement from: Mavis Staples, Pops Staples, The Staple Singers, Krystle Warren, Bobby Watson & The I Have A Dream Project featuring Glenn North, Bob & Una Walkenhorst, Kelly Hunt, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Labelle, Curtis Mayfield, Maceo & The Macks, Mahalia Jackson, Marian Anderson, The Swan Silvertones, Sweet Honey in The Rock, Aaron Neville, Soweto Gospel Choir, Tramaine Hawkins, Ella Mitchell, Billy Porter, Solomon Burke, Nina Simone, Pete Seeger, and Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion.

At 11:15 KC based musicians Kelly Hunt and Una Walkenhorst share details about Hunt’s new SongCraft Sessions series, starting January 16, at 7:00, at recordBar, 1520 Grand, with Una Walkenhorst, followed by Scott Hrabko on March 6, Mikal Shapiro on April 11, and Sara Morgan on May 22. The performances will also feature Kelly’s longtime co-conspirator multi-instrumentalist Stas’ Heaney and an occasional rotating band of local musicians. In describing this new series Kelly Hunt said, “When the opportunity for a residency at The recordBar came up, I knew I wanted to do something different with it. Lately, I’ve been gravitating towards new instruments, new styles of writing, arranging and performing. I’ve been craving a public stage that facilitates experimentation, collaboration and community. A place to air out brand new—even unfinished—songs within the context of live performance: a laboratory of sorts. This series is designed to encourage that kind of creative space for both performer and listener—to give the songwriter a unique sounding board for new ideas, and to invite the listener to participate in that creative process. Adv. tickets are $10 and available online at: http://www.therecordbar.com.

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #769

WMM Playlist from October 31, 2018

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, October 31, 2017

Happy Halloween with Béla, Boris, & Bette
+ Man of 1001 Faces – Michael McQuary
+ Sondra Freeman & Apocalypse Meow 11

10:00 – Haunted Recordings

1. “Main Title Instrumental – It’s Showtime Folks”
from: Motion Picture Soundtrack to All That Jazz / Universal / Dec. 20, 1979
[WMM’s theme]

2. William Stromberg & Moscow Symphony Orch. – “Universal Signature”
from: Salter – Skinner: Monster Music / Marco-Polo / 1995
[Frank Skinner was a composer & arranger born in Meredosia, Illinois on Dec. 31, 1897. He died in Beverly Hills, California, Oct. 9, 1968. A graduate of the Chicago Musical College (now the Chicago Conservatory of Music), 16-year-old Frank found employment in vaudeville and began playing in local areas with his brother Carl on drums billed as the Skinner Brothers dance band. He began writing and arranging music for dance bands in New York, from 1925 to 1935, arranging 2000 popular songs for Robbins Publishing. After a short period at MGM, working on musical settings for The Great Ziegfeld (1936), Skinner was hired by Universal Studios. Over the course of his 30 years there, he composed music for more than 200 films earning five Academy Award nominations (1938–43). His distinctive approach to scoring horror films, such as Son of Frankenstein (1939) and The Wolf Man (1941), has been characterized as a ‘passion for chromatic lines … mirrored contours … [and] restrained, yet ominously mythical orchestrations’ (Marcello). He gained new recognition in the 1950s for his lush romantic scores, including those for such Douglas Sirk films as Magnificent Obsession (1954) and Written on the Wind (1956). Despite many changes in the film industry, his book Underscore (1950) has survived as an excellent introduction to film music composition. The Wolf Man is a 1941 American drama horror film written by Curt Siodmak and produced and directed by George Waggner. The film stars Lon Chaney, Jr. as a werewolf named “The Wolf Man” and features Claude Rains, Evelyn Ankers, Ralph Bellamy, Patric Knowles, Béla Lugosi, and Maria Ouspenskaya in supporting roles. The title character has had a great deal of influence on Hollywood’s depictions of the legend of the werewolf. The film is the second Universal Pictures werewolf film, preceded six years earlier by the less commercially successful Werewolf of London (1935). Lon Chaney, Jr. would reprise his classic role as “The Wolf Man” in four sequels, beginning with Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man in 1943.]

3. Anderson Cooper / Donald Trump – “Trump Video Tape”
from: Presidential Debate 2016 #2 – October 9, 2016) / SoundWerks USA / Oct 11, 2016
[Hillary Clinton and Donald J. Trump square off for the second time during a debate held at Washington University in St. Louis. Sunday, October 9, 2016. Moderated by Martha Raddatz and Anderson Cooper.]

4. Sonic Youth – “Youth Against Facism”
from: Dirty (Deluxe Edition) [Remastered] / Interscope – Geffen / July 21, 1992
[Sonic Youth was based in New York City, formed in 1981. Founding members Thurston Moore (guitar, vocals), Kim Gordon (bass, vocals, guitar) and Lee Ranaldo (guitar, vocals) remained together for the entire history of the band, while Steve Shelley (drums) followed a series of short-term drummers in 1985, and rounded out the core line-up. Sonic Youth emerged from the experimental no wave art and music scene in New York before evolving into a more conventional rock band and becoming the most prominent of the American noise rock groups. Sonic Youth have been praised for having “redefined what rock guitar could do” using a wide variety of unorthodox guitar tunings and preparing guitars with objects like drum sticks and screwdrivers to alter the instruments’ timbre. The band is considered to be a pivotal influence on the alternative and indie rock movements. After gaining a large underground following and critical praise through releases with SST Records in the late 1980s, the band experienced mainstream success throughout the 1990s and 2000s after signing to major label DGC in 1990 and headlining the 1995 Lollapalooza festival. In 2011, Ranaldo announced that the band was “ending for a while” following the separation of married couple Gordon and Moore. Thurston Moore updated and clarified the position in May 2014: “Sonic Youth is on hiatus. The band is a democracy of sorts, and as long as Kim and I are working out our situation, the band can’t really function reasonably.” Gordon refers several times in her 2015 autobiography Girl in a Band to the band having “split up”. Dirty is the seventh studio album by American alternative rock band Sonic Youth. It was released on July 21, 1992 by record label DGC. The band recorded and produced the album with Butch Vig in early 1992 at the Magic Shop studios. The sound on Dirty was inspired by the grunge scene of the time, and was described as avant-rock. Some songs on the album mark the first appearance of three guitars in Sonic Youth songs. The album was remastered and released on quadruple vinyl and double CD in 2003. The album spawned four singles. The first single was “100%”; it charted well, but was not the crossover hit the label anticipated. The next was “Youth Against Fascism”, which did not chart well. The last two were “Sugar Kane” and “Drunken Butterfly”, released in 1993. “Sugar Kane” did better commercially than “Youth Against Fascism”. The album sold exceptionally well, reaching No. 6 in the UK Albums Chart (their highest charting album in the UK) and No. 83 in the US. In support of the album, the band embarked on the “Pretty Fucking Dirty” tour of 1992 and 1993, where most of Dirty was played. In late 1992, they toured North America, and in early 1993, they toured New Zealand and Australia.]

5. St. Vincent – “Fear The Future (Piano Version)”
from: MassEducation / Loma Vista – Concord Music / October 12, 2018
[“MassEducation” a brand new acoustic rendition of her previous album Masseduction, Clark’s fifth studio album, was released in October 2017. Pitchfork writes: “Recorded over two days at Manhattan’s Reservoir Studios studios, MassEducation strips its hypersexual, neon-clad predecessor for parts, exposing its songs as tales of longing and nostalgia. Clark seemed to always know that her record contained two lives: “This needs to be something people can really dance to,” she said of a song on her last album, “until they listen to the words and then they’re crying.” Hiding melancholy behind pop production is nothing new, but on an album so saturated with sadness, these pared-down renderings give Clark a chance to indulge in their underlying sentiments.” Anne Erin Clark was born September 28, 1982, in Tulsa Oklahoma. She is known professionally as St. Vincent, a musician, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and record producer. After studying at Berklee College of Music for three years, she began her music career as a member of The Polyphonic Spree. Clark was also a member of Sufjan Stevens’s touring band before forming her own band in 2006. St. Vincent’s work has received consistent praise for its distinct musical style, which blends soft rock, experimental rock, electropop, and jazz influences. Her debut album was Marry Me (2007), followed by Actor (2009), Strange Mercy (2011), St. Vincent (2014), and Masseduction (2017). She released a collaborative album with David Byrne in 2012 titled Love This Giant. Clark also contributed backing vocals for Swans on their 2014 album, To Be Kind. Her fourth solo album, the eponymous St. Vincent, was named album of the year by The Guardian, Entertainment Weekly, NME, and Slant Magazine, as well as second best album of the year by Time magazine. The album won her a Grammy for Best Alternative Album, her first Grammy award. She was the first solo female performer in 20 years to win a Grammy in that category.]

3. Ed Wood – “Plan 9 From Outer Space (Trailer)”
from: Halloween Nuggets: Monster Sixties A Go-Go / Rock Beat / 2014
[Plan 9 from Outer Space (originally titled Grave Robbers from Outer Space) is a 1959 American B & W science fiction horror film. The film was written, produced, directed and edited by Ed Wood, and stars Gregory Walcott, Mona McKinnon, Tor Johnson, Vampira and posthumously bills Bela Lugosi. Shortly after Lugosi’s death the story and screenplay for Grave Robbers from Outer Space were written and finalized, with Wood planning to use the unconnected, unrelated footage of Lugosi as a means of putting a credit for him on the picture. Wood used the Lugosi footage as a means of attracting actors to the picture, by saying to them that he was making “Bela Lugosi’s last movie.” Though Wood’s actions were driven in part by the desire to give his film a ‘star name’ and attract horror fans, the Lugosi cameo was also meant as a loving tribute and farewell to the actor, who had become fast friends with Wood in the last three years of Lugosi’s life. Wood hired his wife’s chiropractor, Tom Mason, as a stand-in for Lugosi, even though Mason was taller than Lugosi and bore no resemblance to him, making him one of the earliest “fake Shemps”. Narration from Criswell was also employed in an attempt to better link Lugosi’s footage with the rest of Plan 9. Every last scrap of material Wood had of Lugosi was utilized in the theatrical cut of the film, including what are minor sprocket discolorations, film trims that would in a normal film be discarded as unusable. Cuts of the film on VHS during the 80s and 90s, the vast majority unauthorized bootleg dupes, varied drastically not only in quality but also in the amount of Lugosi material retained.]

Michael McQuary as Béla Lugosi on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

10:10 – Interview with Béla Lugosi

We have the grand pleasure of welcoming back to our radio show the star of “Plan 9 From Outer Space” his last film and his 108th film, from his 5 decades as an actor.

Béla Lugosi – Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley!

Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó (Oct. 20, 1882 – Aug 16, 1956), known as Bela Lugosi, a Hungarian-American actor. He’d been playing small parts in his native Hungary before making his first film in 1917, but left after the failed Hungarian Revolution. In 1927, he appeared as Count Dracula in a Broadway adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel. He later appeared in the classic 1931 film Dracula by Universal Pictures. He was often paired with Boris Karloff, who was able to demand top billing. To his frustration, Lugosi was increasingly restricted to minor parts, kept employed by the studio principally for the sake of his name on the posters. Among his pairings with Karloff, only in The Black Cat (1934), The Raven (1935), and Son of Frankenstein (1939) did he perform major roles again. Lugosi had been receiving regular medication for sciatic neuritis, and he became addicted to morphine and methadone. This drug dependence was noted by producers, and the offers eventually dwindled down to a few parts in Ed Wood’s low-budget movies, most notably Plan 9 from Outer Space. Lugosi was married five times, and had one son, Bela George Lugosi. Lugosi was buried in the Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California.

Lugosi was also the subject of “Bela Lugosi’s Dead”, the first single by the English band Bauhaus. Released in August 1979, it is often considered to be the first gothic rock record.

Andy Warhol’s 1963 silkscreen The Kiss depicts Lugosi from Dracula about to bite into the neck of co-star Helen Chandler, who played Mina Harker. A copy sold for $798,000 at Christie’s in May 2000.

10:12 – Haunted Recordings

7. The Velvet Underground– “Black Angel’s Death Song (Album Version-Stereo)”
from: The Velvet Underground & Nico (45th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition) / Universal Records / 2012 [Orig. March 12, 1967]
[The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by American rock band the Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico, released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain attention for its experimental performance sensibilities, as well as the focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of its songs including drug abuse, prostitution, sadism and masochism and sexual deviancy. In 1982, musician Brian Eno famously stated that while The Velvet Underground & Nico initially only sold 30,000 copies, “everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies started a band.” Though it was a commercial failure upon release and was almost completely ignored by critics at the time, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. “I’ll Be Your Mirror” is a song by The Velvet Underground. It appeared on their 1967 debut album The Velvet Underground & Nico. It also surfaced as a single a year earlier with “All Tomorrow’s Parties” in 1966. Lou Reed wrote the song for Nico, who provides lead vocals. Inspiration for the song apparently came about after Nico approached Reed after a show in 1965 saying, “Oh Lou, I’ll be your mirror.” The song was a favorite of Reed’s and The Velvet Underground & Nico engineer, Norman Dolph.]

8. Laurie Anderson – “Three Ghosts”
from: Heart of a Dog / Nonesuch / October 23, 2015
[The complete soundtrack recording of Laurie Anderson’s film, Heart of a Dog. Anderson was commissioned by the European TV network Arte to create a feature film — her first in 30 years. Her response was a personal essay entitled Heart of a Dog, a work encompassing joy and heartbreak and remembering and forgetting, at the heart of which is a lament for her late beloved piano-playing and finger-painting dog Lolabelle. Scenes range from realistic footage from the animal’s life to imagined scenes of Lolabelle’s passage through the bardo. It also includes other reflections on life and death including Anderson’s experiences in life in downtown New York after 9/11. The Nonesuch album is the full audio recording of the film, including all music and spoken text. Heart of a Dog has been shown at the Telluride, Venice, and Toronto Film Festivals to critical praise, with the New York Times calling it a “philosophically astute, emotionally charged meditation on death, love, art and dogs.” The movie was screened at the New York Film Festival on October 8, 2015, before opening theatrically at New York’s Film Forum October 21, 2015. It was also shown on HBO. ]

9. Nina Simone -“Save Me”
from: Silk and Soul / RCA / 1967
[Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21, 1933. She died on April 21, 2003. Nina Simone was a singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist who worked in a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. Born in North Carolina, the sixth child of a preacher, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of the few supporters in her hometown of Tryon, North Carolina, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in NYC. Simone recorded more than 40 albums.”]

Michael McQuary as Béla Lugosi on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

10:24 – More Interview with Béla Lugosi.

We have the pleasure of welcoming back to our radio show the star of over 100 films, from his 5 decades as an actor. Bela Lugosi (1882–1956), best known for the original screen portrayal of Bram Stoker’s Dracula in 1931.

Béla Lugosi Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley!

Béla Lugosi’s last film, “Plan 9 From Outer Space” featured Maila Nurmi (Dec. 11, 1922 – Jan. 10, 2008) a Finnish-American actress born in Petsamo, Finland, who created the campy character Vampira. She portrayed Vampira as TV’s first horror host. She is also billed as Vampira in the 1959 movie The Beat Generation where she plays a beatnik poet.

Bela Lugosi also starred in, Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, a 1948 American horror comedy film directed by Charles Barton starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. The picture is the first of several films where the comedy duo meets classic characters from Universal’s horror film stable. In this film, they encounter Count Dracula (Bela Lugosi), Frankenstein’s monster (Glenn Strange), and the Wolf Man (Lon Chaney, Jr.), while subsequent films pair the duo with the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and the Invisible Man. On a TV special in the early 1950s, the two did a sketch where they interacted with the latest original Universal Studios monster being promoted at the time, the Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954). The film is considered the swan song for the “Big Three” Universal horror monsters – Count Dracula, the Wolf Man and Frankenstein’s monster, none of whom had appeared in a Universal film since 1945’s House of Dracula.

Bela Lugosi (1882–1956), best known for the original screen portrayal of Bram Stoker’s Dracula in 1931, was in a large number of movies during the course of his career.

In Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, Lugosi is portrayed by Martin Landau, who received the 1994 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for the performance. According to Bela G. Lugosi (his son), Forrest Ackerman, Dolores Fuller and Richard Sheffield, the film’s portrayal of Lugosi is inaccurate: In real life, he never used profanity, owned small dogs, or slept in coffins. And contrary to this film, Bela did not struggle performing on The Red Skelton Show.

Lugosi was married five times, and had one son, Bela George Lugosi.
The Ellis Island Immigration Museum in NYC features a live 30-minute play that focuses on Lugosi’s illegal entry into the USA and then his arrival at Ellis Island to enter legally.
Béla Lugosi Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley!

10:29

10. Michel Rubini & Denny Jaeger – “Sarah’s Panic”
from: The Hunger (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) MGM/UA Entertainment Co./ 1983

10:30 – Underwriting

10:32 – Haunted Recordings

11. Kenneth Alwyn — “The Bride of Frankenstein (Main Title)”
from: The Bride of Frankenstein (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) / Silva America / 1993
[The Westminster Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Kenneth Alwyn. The Bride of Frankenstein is a 1935 horror film, sequel to Universal Pictures’ 1931 hit Frankenstein directed by James Whale with Boris Karloff as The Monster, Elsa Lanchester in the dual role of his mate and Mary Shelley, Colin Clive as Henry Frankenstein, and Ernest Thesiger as Doctor Septimus Pretorius. The film is rooted in a subplot of the original Mary Shelley novel, Frankenstein (1818). In the film, a chastened Henry Frankenstein abandons his plans to create life, only to be tempted and finally coerced by the Monster, encouraged by Henry’s old mentor Dr. Pretorius, into constructing a mate for him. Bride of Frankenstein was released to critical and popular acclaim, although it encountered difficulties with some state and national censorship boards. Since its release the film’s reputation has grown, and it has been hailed as Whale’s masterpiece. Director James Whale met Franz Waxman at a party and asked him to score the picture. “Nothing will be resolved in this picture except the end destruction scene. Would you write an unresolved score for it?” asked Whale. Waxman created three distinctive themes: one for the Monster; one for the Bride; and one for Pretorius. The score closes, at Whale’s suggestion, with a powerful dissonant chord, intended to convey the idea that the on-screen explosion was so powerful that the theater where the film was being screened was affected by it. Constantin Bakaleinikoff conducted 22 musicians to record the score in a single nine-hour session.]

12. Bobby “Boris” Pickett & The Crypt-Kickers — “Monster Mash”
from: The Original Monster Mash / Decca / August 1, 1962
[“Monster Mash” is a 1962 novelty song and the best-known song by Bobby “Boris” Pickett. The song was released as a single on Gary S. Paxton’s Garpax Records label in August 1962 along with a full-length LP called The Original Monster Mash, which contained several other monster-themed tunes. The “Monster Mash” single was #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on October 20–27 of that year, just before Halloween. It has been a perennial holiday favorite ever since. Pickett was an aspiring actor who sang with a band called the Cordials at night while going to auditions during the day. One night, while performing with his band, Pickett did a monologue in imitation of horror movie actor Boris Karloff while performing the Diamonds’ “Little Darlin'”. The audience loved it, and fellow band member Lenny Capizzi encouraged Pickett to do more with the Karloff imitation. Pickett and Capizzi composed “Monster Mash” and recorded it with Gary S. Paxton, pianist Leon Russell, Johnny MacRae, Rickie Page, and Terry Berg, credited as “The Crypt-Kickers”. (Mel Taylor, drummer for the Ventures, is sometimes credited with playing on the record as well, while Russell, who arrived late for the session, appears on the single’s B-side, “Monster Mash Party”.) The song was partially inspired by Paxton’s earlier novelty hit “Alley Oop”, as well as by the Mashed Potato dance craze of the era. A variation on the Mashed Potato was danced to “Monster Mash”, in which the footwork was the same but Frankenstein-style monster gestures were made with the arms and hands. The song is narrated by a mad scientist whose monster, late one evening, rises from his slab to perform a new dance. The dance becomes “the hit of the land” when the scientist throws a party for other monsters. The producers came up with several low-budget but effective sound effects for the recording. For example, the sound of a coffin opening was imitated by a rusty nail being pulled out of a board. The sound of a cauldron bubbling was actually water being bubbled through a straw, and the chains rattling were simply chains being dropped on a tile floor. In addition to narrating the song in the Karloff voice, Pickett also impersonated fellow horror film actor Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula with the line, “Whatever happened to my Transylvania Twist?” The song was re-released several times and appeared in the U.S. Billboard charts on two occasions after the original release: August 1970 and May 1973. The BBC had banned the record from airplay in 1962 on the grounds that the song was “too morbid”. It was re-released in the United Kingdom in 1973, where it peaked at #3 in early October. In the U.S. the record re-entered the Hot 100 on May 5, 1973, peaking at #10 on August 11. On the September 15, 1973 edition of American Top 40, Casey Kasem mistakenly said that the record had accumulated 40 weeks on the Hot 100, which then would have been the all-time record, only for a listener to inform Kasem later that the record’s three weeks on the Hot 100 in 1970 had been included in the 1973 run, thus reducing the total to 37 weeks. The record has not charted on the Hot 100 since then. To celebrate the 1973 release, Bobby and the Crypt-Kickers toured Dallas and St. Louis around the 1973 Halloween holiday. On this tour, the Crypt-Kickers were composed of Brian Ray (now guitarist with Paul McCartney), drummer Brian Englund, keyboardist Don Chambers, singer Jean Ray, and others. “Monster Mash” re-entered the British charts again on November 2, 2008 at #60. “Monsters’ Holiday”, a Christmas-themed follow up, was recorded by Pickett and released in December 1962, peaking at #30 on the Billboard chart. The tune was penned by the renowned novelty song composer Paul Harrison. In 1985, with American culture experiencing a growing awareness of rap music, Pickett released “Monster Rap”, which describes the mad scientist’s frustration at being unable to teach the dancing monster from “Monster Mash” how to talk. The problem is solved when he teaches the monster to rap. A movie musical based on the song starring Pickett was released in 1995. During the 2004 presidential election, Pickett turned the song into a campaign video and retitled it “Monster Slash,” with lyrics by environmental campaigner Peter Altman, which critiqued President George W. Bush’s environmental policies. The “Transylvania Twist,” mentioned in the lyrics of “Monster Mash,” was written into a full song for the film Spookley the Square Pumpkin (Pickett narrated) and performed by The Honeydoos, a Pointer Sisters-like girl group of singing melons. The backing singers for the record were The Blossoms, led by Darlene Love.]

Michael McQuary as Boris Karloff on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

10:36 – Interview with Boris Karloff

Joining us now, in our 90.1 FM Radio studios is a giant star of stage & screen, an english actor who had already acted in eighty films before being found by director James Whale and cast in his 81st role as Frankenstein’s monster in the classic 1931 film Frankenstein. The role propelled him to stardom. Boris Karloff went on star in Bride of Frankenstein in 1935, and Son of Frankenstein in 1939. He also appeared as Imhotep in The Mummy in 1932.

Boris Karloff Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Boris Karloff was born William Henry Pratt on November 23, 1887, at 36 Forest Hill Road, Camberwell, Surrey (now London), England, but Pratt stated that he was born in nearby Dulwich. His parents were Edward John Pratt, Jr. and Eliza Sarah Millard. His brother, Sir John Thomas Pratt, was a British diplomat. His mother’s maternal aunt was Anna Leonowens, whose tales about life in the royal court of Siam (now Thailand) were the basis of the musical The King and I. Pratt was bow-legged, had a lisp, and stuttered as a young boy. He conquered his stutter, but not his lisp, which was noticeable throughout his career in the film industry.

Pratt spent his childhood years in Enfield, in the County of Middlesex. He was the youngest of nine children, and following his mother’s death was brought up by his elder siblings. He received his early education at Enfield Grammar School, and later at the private schools of Uppingham School and Merchant Taylors’ School. After this, he attended King’s College London where he took studies aimed at a career with the British Government’s Consular Service. However, in 1909, he left university without graduating and drifted, departing England for Canada, where he worked as a farm labourer and did various odd itinerant jobs until happening upon acting.

Karloff acted in eighty movies before being found by James Whale and cast in his eighty-first movie, Frankenstein. Karloff’s role as Frankenstein’s monster in Frankenstein propelled him to stardom. The bulky costume with four-inch platform boots made it an arduous role but the costume and extensive makeup produced the classic image.
The costume was a job in itself for Karloff with the shoes weighing 11 pounds each. Universal Studios was quick to acquire ownership of the copyright to the makeup format for the Frankenstein monster that Jack P. Pierce had designed. Karloff was soon cast as Imhotep who is revived in The Mummy, a mute butler in The Old Dark House (with Charles Laughton) and the starring role in The Mask of Fu Manchu, which were all released within a few months of each other in late 1932. These films confirmed Karloff’s stardom. 5′ 11″, brown-eyed Karloff still played roles in other genres besides horror, such as a religious World War I soldier in the John Ford epic The Lost Patrol (1934).

Horror, however, had now become Karloff’s primary genre, and he gave a string of lauded performances in Universal’s horror films, including several with Bela Lugosi, his main rival as heir to Lon Chaney’s status as the leading horror film star. While the long-standing, creative partnership between Karloff and Lugosi never led to a close friendship, it produced some of the actors’ most revered and enduring productions, beginning with The Black Cat (1934) and continuing with Gift of Gab (1934), The Raven (1935) and The Invisible Ray (1936). Karloff reprised the role of Frankenstein’s monster in two further films, Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Son of Frankenstein (1939), the latter also featuring Lugosi, with Basil Rathbone replacing Colin Clive as the scientist playing god. Rathbone appeared with Karloff again in Tower of London (1939) as the murderous henchman of King Richard III. Karloff revisited the Frankenstein mythos in several later films as well, taking the starring role of the villainous Dr. Niemann in House of Frankenstein (1944), in which the monster was played by Glenn Strange. He reprised the role of the “mad scientist” in 1958’s Frankenstein 1970 as Baron Victor von Frankenstein II, the grandson of the original creator. The finale reveals that the crippled Baron has given his own face (i.e., Karloff’s) to the monster.

10:41 – Haunted Recordings

13. Jason Beers – “Release the Mice!”
from: Ghoulish Songs for Cretins / Jason Beers / August 20, 2018
[Multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Jason Beers is a founding member of The Brannock Device, Dead Voices, and WYCO Lowriders with Johnny Hamil. Jason is known for his bass playing, and his work with Clawhammer banjo, organ/piano/keyboards, trumpet, musical saw, spoons, harmonica, and guitar. Jason has also released multiple recordings with the bands he is associated with through the years. As a solo artist, this year alone, Jason has released 10 full length albums, all available, with 9 previously released albums on his BandCamp page: http://www.jasonbeers.bandcamp.com]

14. Siouxsie & The Banshees – ” Halloween”
from: Juju / Polydor / June 6, 1981
[4th studio album from British post-punk band formed in London in 1976 by vocalist Siouxsie Sioux and bass guitarist Steven Severin. Initially associated with the English punk rock scene, the band rapidly evolved to create “a form of post-punk discord full of daring rhythmic and sonic experimentation”. The Times cited Siouxsie and the Banshees as “one of the most audacious and uncompromising musical adventurers of the post-punk era.” With the release of Juju the group became an important influence on the emerging gothic rock scene. They disbanded in 1996, with Siouxsie and drummer Budgie continuing to record music as The Creatures, a 2nd band they’d formed in the early 1980s. In 2004, Siouxsie began a solo career.]

Michael McQuary as Boris Karloff on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

10:48 – More with Boris Karloff

In non-horror roles, he is best-known for narrating and as the voice of Grinch in the animated television special of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! from 1966. For his contribution to film and television, Boris Karloff was awarded two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Boris Karloff Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley

The 1940s and 1950s – An enthusiastic performer, he returned to the Broadway stage in the original production of Arsenic and Old Lace in 1941, in which he played a homicidal gangster enraged to be frequently mistaken for Karloff. Frank Capra cast Raymond Massey in the 1944 film, which was shot in 1941, while Karloff was still appearing in the role on Broadway (the play’s producers allowed the film to be made under the condition that it not be released until the play closed). He reprised the role on television in the anthology series The Best of Broadway (1955), and with Tony Randall and Tom Bosley in a 1962 production on the Hallmark Hall of Fame.
In 1944, he underwent a spinal operation to relieve his chronic arthritic condition.

His connection with Bela Lugosi continued with Black Friday (1940), You’ll Find Out (also 1940) and The Body Snatcher (1945), the first of three films with RKO produced by Val Lewton. Isle of the Dead (also 1945) and Bedlam (1946) completed the trio.

He married 5 times and had 1 daughter Sara Karloff, by his 4th wife. One marriage was in 1946 right after his divorce. At the time of his daughter’s birth, he was filming Son of Frankenstein and reportedly rushed from the film set to the hospital while still in makeup.

For his contribution to film and television, Boris Karloff was awarded two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at 1737 Vine Street for motion pictures, and 6664 Hollywood Boulevard for television. Karloff was featured by the U.S. Postal Service as Frankenstein’s Monster and the Mummy in its series “Classic Monster Movie Stamps” issued in September 1997. In 1998, an English Heritage blue plaque was unveiled in his hometown in London. The British film magazine Empire in 2016 ranked Karloff’s portrayal as Frankenstein’s monster the sixth-greatest horror movie character of all time.

Boris Karloff Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley

10:53 – Haunted Recordings

15. Thom Yorke – “Voiceless Terror”
from: Suspiria (Music for the Luca Guadagnino Film) / XL Recordings / October 26, 2018
[Suspiria is a 2018 supernatural horror film directed by Luca Guadagnino and written by David Kajganich, based on the 1977 film directed by Dario Argento. Radiohead singer Thom Yorke composed the score, his first feature film soundtrack. It features the London Contemporary Orchestra and Choir and Yorke’s son Noah on drums. He initially refused the offer, but accepted after months of requests from Guadagnino. Much of the score was completed prior to the film shoot, which afforded Guadagnino the opportunity to play the musical score on set during filming. Yorke cited inspiration from the 1982 Blade Runner soundtrack, musique concrète artists such as Pierre Henry, modern electronic artists such as James Holden, and music from the film’s 1977 Berlin setting, such as krautrock. He said: “There’s a way of repeating in music that can hypnotise. I kept thinking to myself that it’s a form of making spells. So when I was working in my studio I was making spells. I know it sounds really stupid, but that’s how I was thinking about it.” Suspiria stars Dakota Johnson, Tilda Swinton in a triple role, Mia Goth, Angela Winkler, Ingrid Caven, Elena Fokina, Sylvie Testud, Renée Soutendijk, Christine LeBoutte, Fabrizia Sacchi, Małgosia Bela, Jessica Harper, and Chloë Grace Moretz. Harper, the lead in the original film, appears in a different role. Set in 1977 Berlin, the plot follows a young American dancer who enrolls at a prestigious dance academy controlled by a coven of witches. Unlike in Argento’s original film which utilized exaggerated color, Guadagnino conceived Suspiria as visually “winter-ish” and bleak, absent of any primary colors. The film also incorporates stylized dance sequences choreographed by Damien Jalet, which factor significantly in its representation of witchcraft. Concurrent to its plot surrounding the coven is a secondary plot involving a psychotherapist who lost his wife under the Nazi regime. Principal photography for Suspiria took place in late 2016 and early 2017 in Varese and Berlin. The score was composed by Radiohead singer Thom Yorke, who completed much of the arrangements prior to and during filming. Suspiria premiered at the 75th Venice International Film Festival on September 1, 2018. In the United States, it was released in a limited release by Amazon Studios in Los Angeles and New York on October 26, 2018, followed by Halloween screenings in select cities before opening wide on November 2, 2018. It will be released in the United Kingdom by Mubi on November 16, 2018.]

16. Jametatone – “Too Late”
from: Empty Bliss / J. Ashley Miller / March 21, 2017
[3-song rare EP from Jametatone, the solo project of J. Ashley Miller who also records with his band as Metatone. J. Ashley Miller is the The 2016 Charlotte Street Generative Performing Artist Award Fellow. He is a composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist. His genre-bending trans-modern work has been performed everywhere from YJ’s to the Kauffman Performing Arts Center, to the MoMa PS1 in NYC. Ashley utilizes a diverse range of technologies, techniques, and collaborators to access obscure facets of the human emotional landscape. Jametatone opened all four shows at The Outburst KC, where Calvin Arsenia performed his 2017 Release Catastrophe “Unplugged” with guest musicians Beau Bledsoe, Fritz Hutchinson, Mark Southerland, and artist & vocalist Seth M. Jones. On December 21, 2017 Jametatone released anew 10-song album “Frog In The Pot”, the solo project of J. Ashley Miller who also records with his band as Metatone You can view more of Ashley’s work at http://www.jametatone.com.]

17. The Misfits – “Halloween”
from: Halloween – Single / Plan 9 Records / October 31, 1981
[Also available on Just Can’t Get Enough: New Wave Halloween. “Halloween” is the 5th single by the horror punk band the Misfits. It was released on singer Glenn Danzig’s label Plan 9 Records. 5,000 copies of the single were pressed on black 7″ vinyl, some of which included a lyrics sheet. This was the first Misfits release to use their Famous Monsters of Filmland-inspired logo, as well as the first to refer to the band as simply “Misfits”. American punk rock band recognized as the progenitors of the horror punk subgenre, blending punk and other musical influences with horror film themes. Founded in 1977 in Lodi, New Jersey by singer & songwriter Glenn Danzig, the group had a fluctuating lineup during its first six years, with Danzig and bassist Jerry Only as the only consistent members. During this time they released several EPs and singles, and with Only’s brother Doyle as guitarist, the albums Walk Among Us (1982) and Earth A.D./Wolfs Blood (1983), both considered touchstones of the early-1980s hardcore punk movement. Misfits disbanded in 1983 and Danzig went on to form Samhain and then the eponymous Danzig. Several albums of reissued and previously unreleased material were issued after the group’s dissolution, and their music became influential to punk rock, heavy metal, and alternative rock music.]

11:01 – Station ID

11:00 – Haunted Recordings

18. Bette Davis – “Kaleidoscope, Broadcast on BBC Radio (Sept. 11, 1974)”
from: Bette Davis In Her Own Words / AudioGO Ltd / September 26, 2011
[In a selection of interviews ranging from 1958 to 1987, Bette Davis talks about visiting England; her career as a star; the film studio’s attempts to change her name and image, and the Hollywood film system. Interviews include: Profile, BBC TV (first broadcast 12 September 1958); Bette Davis at the NFT, BBC TV (first broadcast 17 December 1972); Kaleidoscope, BBC Radio (first broadcast 11 September 1974); Parkinson, BBC TV (18 October 1975); Nine Five, BBC TV (first broadcast 31 October 1975); Woman’s Hour, BBC Radio (first broadcast 12 September 1979); Arena, BBC TV (first broadcast 2 November 1983). Due to the age and nature of this archive material, the sound quality may vary.]

19. Bette Davis – “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane”
from: The Andy Williams Show / Unreleased / December 20, 1962
[Shortly after filming What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? On December 20, 1962, Bette Davis was a guest on The Andy Williams Show to promote the film and upcoming record. When Williams asked Davis what her new record sounded like, she used her fabulous sense of humor to compare it to Chubby Checker. Things really got good when Williams announced that Davis would be performing a little tune for the audience. Davis brought the awesome in a sparkly blue dress, with some sassy dance moves and a set of raspy vocal pipes that were clearly touched by years of constant chain-smoking. The best part is that Davis was happily aware of the camp and the silliness of her performance but she let it rip, regardless. What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? / was released on 7″ Vinyl, in 1962 credited to Bette Davis and Debbie Burton (who on the record does most of the singing) The B-side is: “I’ve Written A Letter To Daddy” on MGM Records.]

Michael McQuary as Bette Davis on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

11:03 – Interview with Bette Davis

Ruth Elizabeth “Bette” Davis was born April 5, 1908 in Lowell, Massachusetts (She died on October 6, 1989). She was an American actress of film, television, and theater. With a career spanning 60 years, she is regarded as one of the greatest actresses in Hollywood history. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice, was the first person to accrue 10 Academy Award nominations for acting, and was the first woman to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute.

Bette Davis Thanks for being with us again on Wednesday MidDay Medley

“Bette” Davis was noted for playing unsympathetic, sardonic characters, and was famous for her performances in a range of film genres, from contemporary crime melodramas to historical and period films, suspense horror, and occasional comedies, although her greatest successes were her roles in romantic dramas.

After appearing in Broadway plays, Davis moved to Hollywood in the summer of 1930. However, her early films for Universal Studios (and as a loanout to other studios) were unsuccessful. She joined Warner Bros. in 1932, and established her career with several critically acclaimed performances. In 1937, she attempted to free herself from her contract. Although she lost the well-publicized legal case against the studio, it marked the beginning of the most successful period of her career. Until the late 1940s, she was one of American cinema’s most celebrated leading ladies, known for her forceful and intense style. Davis gained a reputation as a perfectionist who could be highly combative and confrontational. She clashed with studio executives and film directors, as well as many of her co-stars. Her forthright manner, idiosyncratic speech, and ubiquitous cigarette contributed to a public persona, which has often been imitated.

Davis was the co-founder of the Hollywood Canteen, and was the first female president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice, was the first person to accrue 10 Academy Award nominations for acting, and was the first woman to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute. Her career went through several periods of eclipse, and she admitted that her success had often been at the expense of her personal relationships. Married four times, she was once widowed and three times divorced, and raised her children as a single parent. Her final years were marred by a long period of ill health, but she continued acting until shortly before her death from breast cancer, with more than 100 film, television, and theater roles to her credit during her six-decade-long career. In 1999, Davis was placed second behind Katharine Hepburn on the American Film Institute’s list of the greatest female stars of classic Hollywood cinema.

11:08 – Haunted Recordings

20. Madonna – “Frozen”
from: Ray Of Light / Maverick – Warner Bros. / February 22, 1998
[7th studio album by Madonna. After giving birth to her first child, Madonna started working on the album with producers Babyface & Patrick Leonard. Following failed sessions, Madonna pursued a new musical direction with English producer William Orbit. The recording process was the longest of Madonna’s career and experienced problems with Orbit’s hardware arrangement, which would break down, and recording would be delayed until they could be repaired. A departure, Ray of Light is an electronica and dance album which incorporates multiple genres, including ambient, trip hop, and Middle Eastern music. Vocally, the album saw Madonna sing with greater breadth and a fuller tone. Mystical themes are also strongly present in both the music & lyrics, as a result of Madonna embracing Kabbalah, her study of Hinduism & Buddhism, as well as her daily practice of Ashtanga Yoga. The album received universal acclaim, with reviews commending the singer’s new musical direction. Called her “most adventurous” record, Ray of Light has been noted for its introspective, spiritual nature, with Madonna’s vocals also being praised. Ray of Light won four Grammy Awards from a total of six nominations. The album peaked at #1 in several countries including Australia, Canada, Germany, Poland, and the UK. The album debuted at #2 on the US Billboard 200, with the biggest first-week sales by a female artist at the time, and has sold over 16 million copies worldwide. Five singles were released from the album, including the international hits “Frozen” and “Ray of Light”. The album’s promotion was later supported by the Drowned World Tour in 2001. Academics have noted the album’s influence on popular music, and how it introduced electronica into mainstream pop culture. They also noted Madonna’s musical re-invention which helped her remain contemporary among the teen-marketed artists of the period. Ray of Light is frequently cited by critics as one of the greatest albums of all time.]

21. Cesar Davila-Irizarry & Charlie Clouser – “American Horror Story Theme”
from: American Horror Story Theme – Single / 20th Century Fox TV Records / Oct 17, 2012
[The song was composed in 1998 by César Dávila-Irizarry. Today he’s a television sound editor in Los Angeles, but back then he was just a sophomore at the University of Puerto Rico, living at his mother’s house, futzing around with digital remixes on Windows ’95. “I started playing around with the software that other people were using then, which was Cool Edit 96,” he recalls. “I was just getting some demons out.” He grew attached to a particular sparse, haunting melody and added sounds of clattering metal hangers, dripping water and white noise—all distorted beyond recognition. To some ears, the hangers might sound like an electric guitar. He gave the song to his friend Gabriel Diaz and didn’t think much about it until Diaz—now an editor at Prologue Pictures—dusted off the track a decade later and slotted it in as a temp track for the American Horror Story title sequence. (A temp track is placeholder music that editors use while working on rough cuts.) Everyone at FX and Prologue grew so accustomed to Dávila-Irizarry’s song, they decided to keep it—even after hiring composer Charlie Clouser (formerly of Nine Inch Nails) to write entirely new music. Clouser submitted four of his own demos, but each time was told to make the music sound more like the temp track.

Michael McQuary as Bette Davis on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

11:15 – More with Bette Davis

We’re with legendary star of film Bette Davis was born April 5, 1908 in Lowell, Massachusetts (She died on October 6, 1989). She was, regarded as one of the greatest actresses in Hollywood history. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice, was the first person to accrue 10 Academy Award nominations for acting, and was the first woman to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute.

Bette Davis – Thanks for being with on Wednesday MidDay Medley

In 1930, 22-year-old Davis moved to Hollywood to screen test for Universal Studios. Davis and her mother traveled by train to Hollywood. She later recounted her surprise that nobody from the studio was there to meet her. In fact, a studio employee had waited for her, but left because he saw nobody who “looked like an actress”. She failed her first screen test, but was used in several screen tests for other actors. In a 1971 interview with Dick Cavett, she related the experience with the observation, “I was the most Yankee-est, most modest virgin who ever walked the earth. They laid me on a couch, and I tested fifteen men … They all had to lie on top of me and give me a passionate kiss. Oh, I thought I would die. Just thought I would die.” A second test was arranged for Davis, for the 1931 film A House Divided. Hastily dressed in an ill-fitting costume with a low neckline, she was rebuffed by the film director William Wyler, who loudly commented to the assembled crew, “What do you think of these dames who show their chests and think they can get jobs?”. Carl Laemmle, the head of Universal Studios, considered terminating Davis’ employment, but cinematographer Karl Freund told him she had “lovely eyes” and would be suitable for Bad Sister (1931), in which she subsequently made her film debut. Her nervousness was compounded when she overheard the chief of production, Carl Laemmle, Jr., comment to another executive that she had “about as much sex appeal as Slim Summerville”, one of the film’s co-stars. The film was not a success, and her next role in Seed (1931) was too brief to attract attention.

Universal Studios renewed her contract for three months, and she appeared in a small role in Waterloo Bridge (1931), before being lent to Columbia Pictures for The Menace, and to Capital Films for Hell’s House (all 1932). After one year, and six unsuccessful films, Laemmle elected not to renew her contract. Davis was preparing to return to New York when actor George Arliss chose Davis for the lead female role in the Warner Bros. picture The Man Who Played God (1932), and for the rest of her life, Davis credited him with helping her achieve her “break” in Hollywood. The Saturday Evening Post wrote, “She is not only beautiful, but she bubbles with charm”, and compared her to Constance Bennett and Olive Borden.

Warner Bros. signed her to a 5-year contract, and she remained with the studio for the next 18 years. Davis married Harmon Oscar Nelson on August 18, 1932, in Yuma, Arizona. Their marriage was scrutinized by the press; his $100 a week earnings compared unfavorably with Davis’ reported $1,000 a week income. Davis addressed the issue in an interview, pointing out that many Hollywood wives earned more than their husbands, but the situation proved difficult for Nelson, who refused to allow Davis to purchase a house until he could afford to pay for it himself. Davis had several abortions during the marriage. After more than 20 film roles, the role of the vicious and slatternly Mildred Rogers in the RKO Radio production of Of Human Bondage (1934), a film adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham’s novel, earned Davis her first major critical acclaim. Many actresses feared playing unsympathetic characters, and several had refused the role, but Davis viewed it as an opportunity to show the range of her acting skills. Her co-star, Leslie Howard, was initially dismissive of her, but as filming progressed, his attitude changed, and he subsequently spoke highly of her abilities. The director John Cromwell allowed her relative freedom: “I let Bette have her head. I trusted her instincts.” She insisted that she be portrayed realistically in her death scene, and said: “The last stages of consumption, poverty, and neglect are not pretty, and I intended to be convincing-looking.” The film was a success, and Davis’ characterization won praise from critics, with Life writing that she gave “probably the best performance ever recorded on the screen by a U.S. actress”. Davis anticipated that her reception would encourage Warner Bros. to cast her in more important roles, and was disappointed when Jack L. Warner refused to lend her to Columbia Studios to appear in It Happened One Night, and instead cast her in the melodrama Housewife. When Davis was not nominated for an Academy Award for Of Human Bondage, The Hollywood Citizen News questioned the omission, and Norma Shearer, herself a nominee, joined a campaign to have Davis nominated. This prompted an announcement from the Academy president, Howard Estabrook, who said that under the circumstances, “any voter … may write on the ballot his or her personal choice for the winners”, thus allowing, for the only time in the Academy’s history, the consideration of a candidate not officially nominated for an award. The uproar led, however, to a change in academy voting procedures the following year, wherein nominations were determined by votes from all eligible members of a particular branch, rather than by a smaller committee, with results independently tabulated by the accounting firm Price Waterhouse. Davis appeared in Dangerous (1935) as a troubled actress, and received very good reviews.

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Davis spent the early months of 1942 selling war bonds. After Jack Warner criticized her tendency to cajole crowds into buying, she reminded him that her audiences responded most strongly to her “bitch” performances. She sold $2 million worth of bonds in two days, as well as a picture of herself in Jezebel for $250,000. She also performed for black regiments as the only white member of an acting troupe formed by Hattie McDaniel, which included Lena Horne and Ethel Waters.

In 1960, Davis, a registered Democrat, appeared at the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles, where she met future President John F. Kennedy, whom she greatly admired. Outside of acting and politics, Davis was an active and practicing Episcopalian.

1961-1970: Renewed success – Davis received her final Academy Award nomination for her role as demented Baby Jane Hudson in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) Davis and Joan Crawford played two aging sisters, former actresses forced by circumstance to share a decaying Hollywood mansion. The director, Robert Aldrich, explained that Davis and Crawford were each aware of how important the film was to their respective careers, and commented: “It’s proper to say that they really detested each other, but they behaved absolutely perfectly.” After filming was completed, their public comments against each other allowed the tension to develop into a life-long feud. When Davis was nominated for an Academy Award, Crawford contacted the other Best Actress nominees (who were unable to attend the ceremonies) and offered to accept the award on their behalf, should they win. When Anne Bancroft was announced as winner, Crawford accepted the award on Bancroft’s behalf.

Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964) was Robert Aldrich’s follow-up to What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?. Aldrich planned to reunite Davis and Crawford, but Crawford withdrew allegedly due to illness soon after filming began. She was replaced by Olivia de Havilland. The film was a considerable success, and brought renewed attention to its veteran cast, which also included Joseph Cotten, Mary Astor, Agnes Moorehead, and Cecil Kellaway.

Davis’ name became well known to a younger audience when Kim Carnes’ song “Bette Davis Eyes” (written by Jackie DeShannon) became a worldwide hit and the best-selling record of 1981 in the U.S., where it stayed at #1 on the music charts for more than two months. Davis’ grandson was impressed that she was the subject of a hit song and Davis considered it a compliment, writing to both Carnes and the songwriters, and accepting the gift of gold and platinum records from Carnes, and hanging them on her wall.

Bette Davis – Thanks for being with on Wednesday MidDay Medley

11:20 – Haunted Recordings

22. Screaming Jay Hawkins – “I Put a Spell on You”
from: Single – (Jeremy Sole’s Zombie Stomp Remix) / self released / 2011
[Jeremy Sole is a critically acclaimed DJ, he is also a radio show host at KCRW in Santa Monica, California (www.kcrw.com) and is Co-Founder and resident deejay of “AFRO FUNKÉ.” Sole has drawn a loyal crowd every week for the past 7 years. This is his arena for Afrobeat, Latin, Brazilian and other authentic and remixed world rhythms. Hundreds of international guests have joined him, from deejays Rich Medina and Cut Chemist to impromptu jam sessions with Zap Mama and Stevie Wonder. “Jeremy is a great DJ, presenter, producer and knower-of-music …an extremely cool dude. I cannot stop listening to his remix of ‘I Put A Spell On You’ …it’s irresistible.” – Henry Rollins]

23. Snoop Dogg–”Murder Was the Case (Death After Visualizing Eternity)[feat. Dat Nigga Daz]”
from: Doggystyle / Death Row Records / November 23, 1993
[Debut studio album by American rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg. IThe album was recorded and produced following Snoop’s appearances on Dr. Dre’s debut solo album The Chronic (1992), to which Snoop contributed significantly. The West Coast style in hip-hop that he developed from Dre’s first album continued on Doggystyle. Critics have praised Snoop Doggy Dogg for the lyrical “realism” that he delivers on the album and for his distinctive vocal flow. Despite some mixed criticism of the album initially upon its release, Doggystyle earned recognition from many music critics as one of the most significant albums of the 1990s, as well as one of the most important hip-hop albums ever released. Much like The Chronic, the distinctive sounds of Doggystyle helped introduce the hip-hop subgenre of g-funk to a mainstream audience, bringing forward West Coast hip hop as a dominant force in the early-1990s. Doggystyle debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200, selling 806,858 copies in its first week alone in the United States, which was the record for a debuting artist and the fastest-selling hip-hop album ever. Doggystyle was included on The Source magazine’s list of the 100 Best Rap Albums; as well as Rolling Stone magazine’s list of Essential Recordings of the ’90s.[3] About.com placed the album in No. 17 of the greatest hip hop/rap albums of all time.The album was certified quadruple platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). By November 2015, the album had sold 7 million copies in the United States, and over 11 million copies worldwide.]

24. AKADUNGEONMASTER –”SOF TRAP INTERLUDE”
from: SWINE FLU INSTRUMETALS VERSION ONE / Mother Russia Industries / July 13, 2013
[The experimental project of Tim J. Harte. musician, composer, co-founder of the Kansas City record label, Mother Russia Industries, Tim J.Harte makes music using Sega Genesis, Dungeons and Dragons, math and several hard working laptop computers. Tim J. Harte is currently studiing composition at UMKC’s Conservatory of Music. He just recently composed music and conducted a 7 piece ensemble for Trench Warfare, a theatrical performance presented last Saturday evening, January 13, at the National World War I Museum and Memorial J.C. Nichols Auditorium. Tim also composed original music for Ryan Wilks art exhibit, Here Where You Wish, is an immersive public installation at the Kansas City Public Library.]

Cristine McCurdy, Michael McQuary , Rebecca Monroe, and Mark Manning on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI.

11:28 – Underwriting

11:30 – Haunted Recordings

25. Kraftwerk – “Intermission (2009 Remaster)”
from: Radio-Activity (2009 Remaster) / Parlophone Records / October 6, 2009
[Origianally released in October 1975. The fifth studio album by German electronic band Kraftwerk. It is a concept album organized around the theme of radio communication. To cater to the band’s international audience, all releases of the album were bilingual with lyrics in both English and German, the only localised difference being the album and track titles. being about radioactivity and the other half about activity on the radio. More word plays are evident in the track listing: “Radio Stars”, which as a title could refer to pop stars, but upon listening is revealed to be about quasars and pulsars. This was the first Kraftwerk album to be entirely self-produced by Ralf Hütter and Schneider in their Kling Klang studio, and the first one to be performed by the “classic” Hütter, Florian Schneider, Karl Bartos and Wolfgang Flür line-up. All the music was written by Hütter and Schneider, with Emil Schult collaborating on lyrics. Schult also designed the artwork – a modified illustration of a late-1930s ‘Deutscher Kleinempfänger’ radio. It was the first Kraftwerk album to feature use of the distinctive Vako Orchestron keyboard (choir, string and organ sounds), which the group had purchased on their recent US Autobahn tour and the Moog Micromoog which was used extensively on this album. Notably, it provided the harsh sounds on the track “Antenna”. The band’s custom-built electronic percussion also featured heavily in the sound, and extensive use was made of the vocoder. The usual synthesizers were present (including Minimoog and ARP Odyssey), and Hütter’s Farfisa electronic piano made a return on “Transistor”. For the first time the group did not use flute, violin or guitars. By 1975, Hütter and Schneider’s previous publishing deals with Capriccio Music and Star Musik Studio of Hamburg had expired. The compositions on Radio-Activity were published by their own newly set up Kling Klang Verlag music publishing company, giving them greater financial control over the use of songwriting output. Also, the album was the first to bear the fruit of Kling Klang as an established vanity label under the group’s new licensing deal with EMI. The album reached #59 in Canada, in February 1976. The title track “Radioactivity” was released as a single, and became a hit in France after it was used as the theme to a popular music show. The song was later re-recorded by Kraftwerk for their 1991 album The Mix. It was further remixed, for subsequent single release, by William Orbit and François Kevorkian.]

26. Jimi Shawndi – “Creatures Of The Night ( Michael Mixxxx)”
from: Creatures of The Night – Single / Jimi Shwndi / 2018
[This recording features the vocal talents of Michael McQuary]

11:33 – Interview with Michael McQuary

Michael McQuary as Bette Davis on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

Michael McQuary as Boris Karloff on the October 31, 2018 edition of Wednesday MidDay Medley on 90.1 FM KKFI. (Photo by Mark Manning)

“Michael McQuary is more than a pretty face, and he’s got a thousand, anyway. His is a talent today’s entertainment world needs more of. From Fu Manchu to Phantoms to Dietrich, Michael carries them all off to perfection, and I knew the originals. This talented entertainer perfects his transformations while allowing the audience a glimpse of the artist beneath the mask.” – Rex Reed

Michael McQuary – Thanks for being with on Wednesday MidDay Medley

Stage & screen actor, Michael McQuary was born and raised in Portland, Oregon in the 1960s. Michael tells us that he learned about the world “sideways,” and that as a child, “the movies took care of him.”

Michael remembers, at the age of 6, pointing to the television, spellbound by Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula, he said to his mother, “Look how he holds his cape!” From then on Michael’s childhood was focused on his own creative world.

Michael is a master impressionist, with a unique take on the legendary “Monsters of Filmland” and the brightest stars of Hollywood’s golden age. Michael is also a character actor and can be seen in multiple films and shorts.

Michael was the creator of the award winning one-man shows in New York City including: Matinee Idol, Man of 1001 Faces, Crystal Allan Strikes Back, Back Then They Had Faces, My Own Space and most recently, for KC Fringe Festival “I’m Hollywood.”

He is also a visual stylist and original “Party Monster – Club Kid” from downtown NYC.
Along with performing, Michael McQuary works as a visual artist, making a name for himself at celebrated events where he wows spectators with #youressenceinseconds.

Michael also designs very special works that are forged into art and jewelry based on a one-of-a-kind symbols he creates individually for clients through his company: http://www.YourPowerSign.com.

Michael McQuary – Thanks for being with on Wednesday MidDay Medley

11:40 – Apocalypse Meow 11

27. Hot Suede – “Forget About You”
from: Forget About You – Single / Hot Suede / August 16, 2018
[Formed October 4, 2017, Hot Suede is a new original rock and roll band from Kansas City, Missouri showcasing fiery guitar riffs, an equally groovy and thunderous rhythm section, soaring vocals, and unparalleled swagger. Rising from the ashes of juggernaut Cherokee Rock Rifle, guitarists Doug Nelson, Scott Reed, and drummer Brett Southard joined forces with bassist Chad Toney and vocalist Wayne Hutcherson aka Bobby W. Topaz to form an unpretentious rock band with classic undertones and guitar-driven songwriting. On October 12, 2017 Hot Suede released the single “Get What You Came For.” On December 20, 2017 Hot Suede released the single, “Make It Harder.” More info at: http://www.hotsuede.com]

[Hot Suede play Mills Record Company, Fri, Nov 2, at 7:00 PM for Apocalypse Meow 11, Night One.]

11:43 – Interview with Sondra Freeman

Sondra Freeman is Director of Promotions and Artist Relations for Midwest Music Foundation, a nonprofit created to support music and musicians in Kansas City and the surrounding areas, founded in 2008 by a collective of musicians and music lovers. The Midwest Music Foundation (MMF) unites and empowers the greater Kansas City music community by providing programs and resources to area musicians through outreach, support, education, and health care opportunities. Sondra is instrumental in MMF’s annual events: Apocalypse Meow, MidCoast Takeover and the MidCoast Takeover fundraiser shows, as well as many other collaborative musical events and fundraisers.

Abigail Henderson co-founded Midwest Music Foundation, since her death, five years ago, friends, musicians, collaborators have kept this not-for-profit alive.

Midwest Music Foundation is a part of events all year round: Midcoast Takeover, Middle of The Map Fest, Crossroads Music Fest, and more.

The Midwest Music Foundation and 90.9 The Bridge are proud to present the 11th Annual Apocalypse Meow to benefit Abby’s Fund for Musicians’ Health Care on Friday, Nov. 2 and Saturday, Nov. 3.

For more information http://www.midwestmusicfoundation.org/apocalypsemeow

It kicks off with a free, all-ages concert at Mills Record Company (4045 Broadway Blvd) on Friday, Nov. 2, with Hot Suede and The Whiffs. Doors open at 7 p.m., and Barry Lee (KKFI 90.1 FM) will emcee.

The main event is held on Saturday, Nov. 3, at recordBar (1520 Grand Blvd), with doors opening at 6 p.m. The Too Much Rock Main Stage will showcase performances by Bacon Shoe, The Almighty Trouble Brothers, Chris Meck and The Second Sons, and Chase The Horseman. Jen Harris, Kelly Hunt and Eems will perform on the acoustic stage. Jonathan Wier (The Jonathan Wier Show, KMBZ-FM 98.1) and Paul Chandler (X105.1KC and 105.9 KISS FM) will emcee. Tickets for Saturday are available for $10 at this link or $15 at the door.

RockDocs, a collaboration of University of Kansas and the Community Health Council of Wyandotte County will be on site Saturday to offer health care and ACA information, screenings, wellness programs, opportunities to discuss health conditions and concerns, and arrange follow ups.

A silent auction and raffles will feature an assortment of items donated by local businesses. This event is supported by the Kansas City Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund. More information and a full list of sponsors can be found here. To view a promotional video about Apocalypse Meow with support from Mayor Sly James, visit this link.

In 2008, Apocalypse Meow was established to raise medical funds for local musician Abigail Henderson, who had been diagnosed with cancer. Compelled to give back to the community, she co-founded MMF to provide musicians with health care assistance. Though she passed away in 2013, Abigail’s mission continues — MMF provides financial resources, educational programs, health clinics and events throughout the year. Abby’s Fund dispenses emergency health care grants to KC-area musicians, having contributed more than $130,000 since its inception.

For more information you can visit http://www.midwestmusicfoundion.org.

11:55

28. Chase The Horseman – “RIPchord”
from: RIPchord – Single / Chase the Horseman / eOctober 24, 2017
[Recorded at Element Recording with Engineering, Mixing, Mastering, Coiling, Tutelage nu Joel Nanos , and Fritz Hutchison on C&C Drums, Kustom K Cymbals, Heidi Lynne Gluck on Fender Jazz Bass, Grounding, and Chase Horseman on Prophet 600, Wurlitzer 206, Drumbrute, Arp Explorer, Hagstrom 12-String, Framus 12 String, vox. Chase the Horseman is a band, film composer, multi-instrumentalist, audio engineer, and producer. He has composed music for over 36 films and as musician has collaborated with Clairaudients, Teri Quinn, Heidi Lynne Gluck, and many more.]

[Chase The Horseman plays Apocalypse Meow 11, Saturday, November 3 at recordBar, 1520 Grand with Chris Meck and the Second Sons, Bacon Shoe, The Almighty Trouble Brothers, Jen Harris, Kelly Hunt and Eems.]

29. Noel Coward – “The Party’s Over Now”
from: Noel Coward in New York / drg / 2003 [orig. 1957]
[WMM Closing Theme]

Next week, on November 7 we play more of New & MidCoastal Releases. Plus we’ll be joined by company members of Spinning Tree Theatre’s production of “The Nance” running through November 18 at Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, KCMO. We’ll also talk with Ben Parks and Matthew Dunehoo about the debut recording of their band SLIGHTS and their album release show, November 30, at recordBar.

Our Script/Playlist is a “cut and paste” of information.
Sources for notes: artist’s websites, bios, wikipedia.org

Wednesday MidDay Medley in on the web:
http://www.kkfi.org,
http://www.WednesdayMidDayMedley.org,
http://www.facebook.com/WednesdayMidDayMedleyon90.1FM

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #758

Wednesday MidDay Medley’s Halloween with Béla, Boris, & Bette + Apocalypse Meow 11

Wednesday MidDay Medley
TEN to NOON Wednesdays – Streaming at KKFI.org
90.1 FM KKFI – Kansas City Community Radio
Produced and Hosted by Mark Manning

Wednesday, October 31, 2017

Happy Halloween with Béla, Boris, & Bette
+ Man of 1001 Faces – Michael McQuary
+ Sondra Freeman & Apocalypse Meow 11

On Halloween Mark plays New & MidCoastal & “Haunted Recordings” from: Hot Suede, Chase The Horseman, Jametatone, Jason Beers, AKA Dundeon Master, St. Vincent, Thom Yorke, Snoop Dogg, Kraftwerk, Laurie Anderson, Nina Simone, Sonic Youth, Madonna, Siouxsie & The Banshees, The Misfits, The Velvet Underground, Screaming Jay Hawkins, Michel Rubini & Denny Jaeger, William Stromberg & Moscow Symphony Orchestra, Kenneth Alwyn, Bette Davis, Cesar Davila-Irizarry & Charlie Clouser, Bobby “Boris” Pickett & The Crypt-Kickers, Donald Trump, and The Jimi Shawndi Band.

Portions of our show will co-hosted by Béla Lugosi, Boris Karloff, and Bette Davis as played by our special guest star, Michael McQuary.

“Michael McQuary is more than a pretty face, and he’s got a thousand, anyway. His is a talent today’s entertainment world needs more of. From Fu Manchu to Phantoms to Dietrich, Michael carries them all off to perfection, and I knew the originals. This talented entertainer perfects his transformations while allowing the audience a glimpse of the artist beneath the mask.” – Rex Reed

Stage & screen actor, Michael McQuary was born and raised in Portland, Oregon in the 1960s. Michael tells us that he learned about the world “sideways,” and that as a child, “the movies took care of him.” Michael remembers, at the age of 6, pointing to the television, spellbound by Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula, he said to his mother, “Look how he holds his cape!” From then on Michael’s childhood was focused on his own creative world. Michael is a master impressionist, with a unique take on the legendary “Monsters of Filmland” and the brightest stars of Hollywood’s golden age. Michael is also a character actor and can be seen in multiple films and shorts. Michael was the creator of the award winning one-man shows in New York City including: Matinee Idol, Man of 1001 Faces, Crystal Allan Strikes Back, Back Then They Had Faces, My Own Space and most recently, for KC Fringe Festival “I’m Hollywood.” He is also a visual stylist and original “Party Monster – Club Kid” from downtown NYC. Along with performing, Michael McQuary works as a visual artist, making a name for himself at celebrated events where he wows spectators with #youressenceinseconds. Michael also designs very special works that are forged into art and jewelry based on a one-of-a-kind symbols he creates individually for clients through his company: http://www.YourPowerSign.com.

At 11:40 we talk with Sondra Freeman of Midwest Music Foundation about the 11th annual Apocalypse Meow benefit concert on Friday, Nov. 2 and Saturday, Nov. 3. The annual concert is MMF’s primary fundraiser for Abby’s Fund For Musicians’ Health Care. It kicks off with a free, all-ages concert at Mills Record Company (4045 Broadway Blvd) on Friday, Nov. 2, with Hot Suede and The Whiffs. Doors open at 7 p.m., and Barry Lee (KKFI 90.1 FM) will emcee. The main event is held on Saturday, Nov. 3, at recordBar (1520 Grand Blvd), with doors opening at 6 p.m. The Too Much Rock Main Stage will showcase performances by Bacon Shoe, The Almighty Trouble Brothers, Chris Meck and The Second Sons, and Chase The Horseman. Jen Harris, Kelly Hunt and Eems will perform on the acoustic stage. Jonathan Wier (The Jonathan Wier Show, KMBZ-FM 98.1) and Paul Chandler (X105.1KC and 105.9 KISS FM) will emcee. Tickets for Saturday are available for $10 at this link or $15 at the door. More information about Apocalypse Meow 11 and MMF can be found at midwestmusicfoundation.org.

Michael McQuary as Bette Davis by Paul Andrews Photography
Michael McQuary as Boris Karloff by M.R. King Images

On your local radio dial 90.1 FM or
STREAMING LIVE at: kkfi.org

Show #758